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Sticking to One Sport Could Up Injuries Among Teen Athletes

SUNDAY, Sept. 29, 2019 — Here’s a good reason to encourage your teenager to play more than one sport: New research finds kids who concentrate on only one sport may be at risk for stress fractures, tendinitis and knee injuries.

“It’s wonderful for a child to love a sport and to want to engage in it, but we must keep in mind the number of hours spent playing,” said study author Alison Field, a professor of epidemiology and pediatrics at Brown University. “They add up pretty quickly.”

The findings are a result of following more than 10,000 older children throughout the United States. The bottom line is that kids who do the most hours of intense activity per week, and that happens to be those focusing on a single sport, are the most likely to be injured.

Field hopes that coaches, parents and doctors urge children to engage in less intense, less specialized training.

The best advice is that kids should spend only a moderate amount of time in vigorous physical activity. If they have to specialize, they should replace some training with different types of exercise, such as yoga and conditioning, she suggested.

The risk for injury differed for girls and boys. For girls, no sport stood out as being extra risky. Specializing, however, increased girls’ risk of injury by about 30%.

Specialization did not significantly increase boys’ risk of injury, but baseball, gymnastics or cheerleading did increase the risk, the findings showed.

“There’s been a lot of concern about females having a higher risk of certain injuries,” Field said in a university news release. “The question is: Is that risk highest just as they’re going through their pubertal growth spurt, and then does it come back down a bit? And then we need to talk to coaches and trainers and say, ‘What can we do to mitigate that risk?'”

The report was published online recently in the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine.

More information

For more on children and sports, visit Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: September 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Marijuana Use Among College Students Rising Fast

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 — Marijuana use by U.S. college students in 2018 was the highest in 35 years, researchers report.

Their survey of about 1,400 respondents, ages 19 to 22, found that about 43% of full-time college students said they used some form of marijuana at least once in the past year, up from 38% in 2017, and previous month use rose to 25% from 21%, the Associated Press reported Thursday.

The 2018 rates are the highest found in the annual University of Michigan survey since 1983.

About 6% of college students said they used marijuana 20 or more times in the past month, compared with 11% of respondents the same age who weren’t in college, the AP reported.

“It’s the frequent use we’re most worried about” because it’s associated with poor school performance and can harm mental health, researcher John Schulenberg said.

In the United States, marijuana use is greater among college-age adults than any other age group, the AP reported.

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Pot Poisonings Among Kids, Teens Double After Medical Marijuana Law Passed

FRIDAY, Aug. 16, 2019 — Pot-related poisoning calls involving kids and teens more than doubled in Massachusetts after the state legalized medical marijuana, a new study reports.

Calls related to cannabis exposure increased 140% in the years after Massachusetts voted to legalize medical pot in 2012, according to data from the state’s regional poison control center.

This happened even though Massachusetts learned from the example of other states and placed tough packaging requirements to make pot products less enticing and harder to open for kids, said lead researcher Jennifer Whitehill. She’s an assistant professor with the University of Massachusetts Amherst School of Public Health and Health Sciences.

“It was not the same as it was in Colorado, circa 2013, when there were products labeled to look like candy wrappers,” Whitehill said. “Nonetheless, even despite opaque and tamper-proof and child-proof packaging requirements, we still saw little kids getting into the products and having some bad experiences.”

The new report echoes previous studies showing an increase in marijuana-related medical problems following legalization in Colorado and Washington, the researchers noted.

For example, a March 2019 study in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that marijuana-related visits to emergency rooms more than tripled at one Colorado hospital between 2012 and 2016.

Based on that example, Massachusetts lawmakers adopted strict mandates for childproof packaging and warning labels on marijuana products, Whitehill said.

To see if those tougher requirements made any difference, Whitehill and her colleagues analyzed poison control center data from 2009 through 2016, four years before and after a ballot initiative legalized medical marijuana in the state.

During the study period, poison control received 218 calls from Massachusetts involving pot exposure in children and teens. The calls represented only 0.15% of all calls to poison control during that period related to kids.

But the incidence of pot-related calls leapt to 1.1 calls per 100,000 population after legalization, up from just 0.4 calls per 100,000 population prior to legalization, the findings showed.

“I had been hopeful that the stricter packaging laws that Massachusetts implemented would have prevented us from seeing some kind of increase,” Whitehill said.

Nearly four out of five calls came from health care facilities and involved exposures that resulted in moderate or minor health effects, the researchers said. There were only four cases with major effects, and no deaths were reported.

In one case, two teenage boys collapsed while playing sports hours after smoking what they thought was marijuana, the study says. The teens, 17 and 18, went into cardiac arrest but were successfully resuscitated.

About one-quarter of the cases were reported as unintentional ingestion, with nearly 20% of those involving children younger than 4.

The results provide parents a “good reminder to be thoughtful and cautious about where they store their cannabis, especially edible products,” Whitehill said.

Teens represented the largest number of cases reported to poison control, with ages 15 to 19 accounting for 82% of all calls related to marijuana.

Experimentation likely spurred most of those calls, Whitehill said.

“Teenagers are clever and crafty,” Whitehill said. “Parents for a long time have thought about where to store alcohol that isn’t easily accessible by their children. As the social norms around cannabis in people’s homes start to change, I think it’s well worth parents thinking about the safer storage of cannabis products.”

These results show that more can be done to keep legal pot out of the hands of children, said Linda Richter, director of policy research and analysis with the Center on Addiction, in New York City.

“Policymakers should ban marijuana edibles that look like regular food products — especially those that appeal to children, such as gummy bears, lollipops, other candy, chocolate or brownies,” Richter said. “In addition to child-resistant packaging, opaque and resealable packaging for marijuana edibles should be required to help prevent young children from being able to see or access the marijuana inside the package, even if it has already been opened.”

Manufacturers also should be required to package marijuana products in small doses so even if a child does get into a package, their exposure will be minimized, Richter said.

As far as teens are concerned, Richter urges parents to set a good example.

“What parents do is just as or more important than what they say to kids,” Richter said. “If they have a cavalier attitude about marijuana, extolling its benefits and conveying how much they need it to relax or have fun, that message comes across much more strongly to kids than any admonitions regarding its harms.”

The new study was published online Aug. 16 in JAMA Network Open.

More information

The Center on Addiction has more about discussing marijuana with your teen.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: August 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

FDA Reports More Seizures Among Vapers

By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Aug. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) — There have been 118 more reports of e-cigarette users suffering seizures since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration first warned the public about the danger in April.

That brings the total number of reported cases to 127 between 2010 and 2019, the agency said Wednesday.

However, the additional cases don’t necessarily indicate a rise in the rate or number of such incidents, according to the FDA.

The agency said it hasn’t pinpointed any specific brand of product or product problem associated with cases of seizures among e-cigarette users.

However, the FDA said it’s concerned about the possibility of a link between e-cigarette use and seizures or other similar medical conditions, and is asking e-cigarette users, medical professionals and others to provide as much information as possible when reporting health or safety problems stemming from tobacco products.

This can be done through the FDA’s online Safety Reporting Portal.

When providing care for patients who’ve suffered a seizure or other neurological event, health care providers should ask patients about e-cigarette use, the FDA advised.

In addition, health care providers should help patients report any e-cigarette-associated health problems, the agency said in a news release.

When reporting a problem, the FDA asks for as much information as possible to help identify trends, patterns or causes.

Those details include: the person’s name; the name of the manufacturer; the brand name, model and serial number of the e-cigarette or e-liquid; where the device or liquid was bought; if the device or liquid was modified in any way or if the device malfunctioned.

Other information sought by the FDA includes: any use or exposure to other tobacco products, medications, supplements, substances of abuse or toxins around the same time; any other symptoms or warning before the seizure, such as nausea, vomiting, change in the user’s behavior, alertness, vision or hearing; and past history of e-cigarette use.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, news release, Aug. 7, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

Exclusive: Jhonen Vasquez, Adam Elliot Among Guests at Pixelatl in Sept.

If you’re looking for an invigorating way to end the summer and jumpstart your animation career, look no further than the Pixelatl festival, which takes place Sept. 3-7 in the lush town of Cuernavaca, cradled by the Tepozteco mountains, south of Mexico City.

According to the festival’s ebullient director Jose Iñesta, this year’s edition promises to be quite memorable, with a special focus on celebrating artists’ “roots and tomorrow.” “The way I see it, we need to acknowledge our roots and where we come from to project ourselves to the future,” he explains. “For us, the most basic root that we share with all human beings is storytelling: It’s what makes us human and helps us to connect with one another and form a community. I also want to highlight our creative partner this year, Kraneo Animation Studio. They have gone beyond the challenge of creating a promo for the festival to create the whole experience of the event. You can see roots, masks, and beautiful craftsmanship that stop-motion brings to the media in all our promotional material.”

One of the year’s big highlights is a celebration of animation, games and comic-books of Spain. “Spain is our country of honor, and there will be a track of Spanish activities, conferences, screenings, workshops, etc.,” notes Iñesta. “We also have a track of videogames that includes a 20-hour workshop for game level design. All of these, in addition to our animators, illustrators, and producers track, make the festival rich in content. I should mention that other activities that excite me the most are the VR workshop with Goro Fujita and the strong stop-motion directors participating like Adam Elliot and Cesar Díaz.”

Most attendees agree with Iñesta that the Pixelatl is quite different from events of its kind, in part because of its beautiful environment and relaxed ambience. After all, there are not too many places where animators and artists can hang out with peacocks in a beautiful garden. Among the top animation luminaries attending this year are Jhonen Vasquez (Invader Zim), Adam Elliot (Mary and Max), Susie Lewis (Sea Rescue), Kaitlin Tremblay (Ubisoft), Andrea Fernandez (The Cuphead Show), Joan Loft (Peppa Pig), Donna Lewis (Disney), Stu Livingston (Hey Arnold! The Jungle Movie), Javi Recio (The Lady and the Reaper), Ollie Green (Adult Swim) and Dave B. Levy (Disney+).

As Iñesta puts it, “At Pixelatl, we are all humble, open to new experiences, and generous to each other. I wish we could live like this every day of the year. We want every person participating in the event to feel that they matter. When we are building something from scratch, every point of view matters. We have built this industry with great examples from all over the world, and we’ve listened to our young creators and artists and try to address their needs. We try to create a space where everybody feels comfortable so that sharing of ideas and projects occur. I think that’s the magic of Pixelatl.”

Since Iñesta travels the world and is in contact with animation movers and shakers everywhere, we had to ask him about his take on the state of the art form globally. “There’s so much going on,” he responds. “The broadcasters and SVODs need content for their new platforms and are commissioning shows left and right. The Mexican animation industry is also growing. Thanks to the Pixelatl Festival, there are six series in production, six option deals in development, and over 60 service agreements with Mexican studios. Over the past eight years, our major achievement is that we have a creative community that is helping everyone grow.”

Iñesta is also quite pleased to see the growth of the Center for Stop Motion Animation in Guadalajara, which is supported by Guillermo del Toro, which will help continue strengthening and growing the art form in the region. “Stop-motion animation is something that occurs naturally in Mexico,” he says. “We have the artistry and theatrical approach to storytelling and when you mix the two, stop-motion is the best tool to tell stories. We are very pleased that our previous festival award-winners Cinema Fantasma studio (founded by brothers Roy and Arturo Ambriz) is now developing a feature film (The Ballad of the Phoenix) in stop-motion now.”

The director says the best way to make the most of Pixelatl is to prepare ahead of time. “There are so many activities that you might feel you are missing an important talk or workshop,” he points out. “My suggestion is pick the one that you feel is the best for you, and then play it by ear. You never know who you’ll meet in the garden or networking area, so perhaps it’s better to stay there than to enter an activity.”

He leaves us with these final words of wisdom. “If you are happy and relaxed, knowledge will come your way anyway. So don’t panic, don’t enter activities obsessively. Just enjoy meeting new people, draw, share your portfolios with other people (you never know who you are pitching to), and have a good time.” ¡Muy buen consejo!

Watch the festival’s beautiful promo, created by Kraneo studio here:

“At Pixelatl, we are all humble, open to new experiences, and generous to each other. I wish we could live like this every day of the year.”

– Festival director Jose Iñesta

For more info about this year’s events, visit www.elfestival.mx/prensa

Pixelatl

Pixelatl 2019 promo created by Puebla City-based stop-motion studio Kraneo 

Mary and Max

Mary and Max, award-winning 2009 feature by Adam Elliot

Jhonen Vasquez

Jhonen Vasquez, creator of Invader Zim

Jose Inesta

Jose Iñesta, talented director of Pixelatl Festival

Adam Elliot

Adam Elliot

Animation Magazine

Sexting May Be Less Common Among Teens Than You Think

FRIDAY, July 26, 2019 — Parents of budding teens can breathe a little easier: A new study says adolescent “sexting” is not an epidemic.

On the other hand, it’s not disappearing, either, despite campaigns to curb it.

“Sexting is perceived as an epidemic because the news highlights extreme cases that involve tragic outcomes, and because it goes against standards of morality and decency that are historically entrenched,” said study author Sameer Hinduja, a professor of criminology at Florida Atlantic University.

But most teens have never sent or received a sex text, the new study found. It focused on about 5,600 students in American middle and high schools, ages 12 to 17.

Of those, about 14% had ever sent a sexually or explicit image or had received one.

For this study, researchers defined sexting as the exchange of nude or semi-nude photos or videos via text or private messaging on social media.

Other researchers have included sexually suggestive or explicit texts. Hinduja said his team didn’t include those, because they can’t lead to sextortion, child pornography charges or related fallout.

About 11% of the students said they had sent a sext to a boyfriend or girlfriend — and about 64% did so when asked to, the study found. But only 43% complied with a request from someone who was not a current romantic partner.

Boys were much more likely to have sent and received a sext from a current partner, but boys and girls were equally likely to receive them from others.

About 4% said they had shared an explicit image sent to them with someone else, without permission — and about as many suspected this had happened to them.

Hinduja said though dishonest responses were removed from the findings, “it is possible that the frequency of sexting among middle schoolers and high schoolers across the United States may be underrepresented in our research.”

While teen sexting is not rampant, the numbers have remained steady over the years, prompting many to question the effectiveness of campaigns to prevent it.

“Teens sext for a variety of reasons — the most popular are sexual exploration, fun, flirtation and to communicate sexual intent,” said Michelle Drouin, a psychology professor at Purdue University-Fort Wayne in Indianapolis. “In some ways it is part of sexual exploration in a digital age. Many teens do it — it’s not a ‘bad kid’ issue.”

Nonetheless, sexting has been linked to psychological trauma among adolescents.

“The young adults I survey sometimes feel distress about the nude or nearly nude photos they have sent,” said Drouin, who wasn’t involved with the study. “I think the only way to curb teen sexting is through targeted education. Sexting should definitely be a standard component of sex education.”

Hinduja said efforts to discourage sexting should not aim to stifle sexual development. Instead, they should focus on the seriousness of potential consequences — legal, financial, reputational, social or otherwise, he said.

For future research, his team is interested in exploring the best ways to deter teens from sexting.

“Are there any messages that resonate more powerfully so that they second-guess taking and sending a nude?” Hinduja said. “Do the consequences they hear about concern them at all? Do they have an invincibility complex about these sorts of things?”

In the meantime, letting teens know that a relatively small proportion of their peers engage in sexting may be a deterrent, he said.

“It underscores that it is not as normal, commonplace, or widespread as they might believe,” Hinduja said in a Florida Atlantic University news release.

The study was published recently in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior. It was co-authored by Justin Patchin, a professor of criminal justice at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.

Patchin and Hinduja are co-directors of the Cyberbullying Research Center.

More information

KidsHealth from Nemours has more advice for parents about teens and sexting.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: July 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Suicides Up Among U.S. Kids; Girls’ Deaths Highest

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Suicide rates are on the rise among American children, but the increase is greatest among girls, a new study finds.

“Overall, we found a disproportionate increase in female youth suicide rates compared to males, resulting in a narrowing of the gap between male and female suicide rates,” said study author Donna Ruch. She is a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Suicide Prevention and Research at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Ohio.

Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among Americans aged 10 to 19, with rates historically higher in boys than girls. However, recent reports from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show a greater increase in suicide rates among girls than boys.

In this study, the researchers examined data on youth suicides from 1975 through 2016.

The findings showed that youth suicide rates for both sexes fell in the early 1990s. But they have increased for both sexes since 2007, with larger increases among girls than boys, particularly among girls aged 10 to 14.

Rates of female suicides by hanging or suffocation are approaching those of males, which is troubling considering the “gender paradox” in suicidal behavior, according to study co-author Jeff Bridge, director of the Center for Suicide Prevention and Research.

Females have higher rates of nonfatal suicidal behavior, such as thinking about and attempting suicide, but more males die by suicide than females, Bridge said.

“One of the potential contributors to this gender paradox is that males tend to use more violent means, such as guns or hanging,” Bridge noted in a Nationwide news release. “That makes the narrowing of the gender gap in suicide by hanging or suffocation that we found especially concerning from a public health perspective.”

The study was published online May 17 in JAMA Network Open.

Future research should look at whether gender-specific suicide risk factors have changed in recent years and how that information could improve suicide prevention efforts, the study authors said.

Asking children directly about suicide will not trigger suicidal thinking or behavior, Bridge said.

“Parents need to be aware of the warning signs of suicide, which include a child making suicidal statements, being unhappy for an extended period, withdrawing from friends or school activities or being increasingly aggressive or irritable,” he explained.

“If parents observe these warning signs in their child, they should consider taking the child to see a mental health professional,” Bridge advised.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: Nationwide Children’s Hospital, news release, May 17, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

Gun Deaths Up Sharply Among America’s Schoolkids

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, March 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Gun-related deaths among school-age children in the United States are increasing at alarming rates, researchers report.

In 2017, gun violence claimed more 5- to 18-year-olds than police officers or active-duty members of the U.S. military, according to a chilling new study led by investigators from Florida Atlantic University.

“It is sobering that in 2017, there were 144 police officers who died in the line of duty and about 1,000 active duty military throughout the world who died, whereas 2,462 school-age children were killed by firearms,” study senior author Dr. Charles Hennekens said in a FAU news release. He’s a professor of medicine at the university’s Schmidt College of Medicine.

The nationwide study found nearly 39,000 gun-related deaths among 5-to-18-year-olds between 1999 and 2017. That included almost 6,500 deaths among kids between 5 and 14 years of age, and more than 32,400 among older teens.

Significant increases began in 2009, with a wave of shootings among 5- to 14-year-olds, followed by a similar wave among teens starting in 2014. Both waves — which researchers described as epidemics — continued through 2017, the most recent year for which data are available.

Gun-related deaths over the period accounted for 5.6 percent of deaths in the younger group and nearly 20 percent among older kids.

Researchers also found statistically significant increases in gun-related deaths among black children aged 5-14, starting in 2013.

Hennekens likened attempts to halt the epidemic without gun control to trying to curb lung cancer deaths due to cigarettes without reducing tobacco use.

The analysis of data from the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics also looked at causes of death among school-age children. It said 61 percent were the result of assault; 32 percent were from suicide; 5 percent were accidental; and 2 percent undetermined.

Blacks accounted for 41 percent of all deaths, and 86 percent were in boys.

The authors said the findings, published March 21 in the American Journal of Medicine, reveal significant public health and policy challenges.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: Florida Atlantic University, news release, March 21, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

Gun Deaths Up Sharply Among America’s Schoolkids

FRIDAY, March 22, 2019 — Gun-related deaths among school-age children in the United States are increasing at alarming rates, researchers report.

In 2017, gun violence claimed more 5- to 18-year-olds than police officers or active-duty members of the U.S. military, according to a chilling new study led by investigators from Florida Atlantic University.

“It is sobering that in 2017, there were 144 police officers who died in the line of duty and about 1,000 active duty military throughout the world who died, whereas 2,462 school-age children were killed by firearms,” study senior author Dr. Charles Hennekens said in a FAU news release. He’s a professor of medicine at the university’s Schmidt College of Medicine.

The nationwide study found nearly 39,000 gun-related deaths among 5-to-18-year-olds between 1999 and 2017. That included almost 6,500 deaths among kids between 5 and 14 years of age, and more than 32,400 among older teens.

Significant increases began in 2009, with a wave of shootings among 5- to 14-year-olds, followed by a similar wave among teens starting in 2014. Both waves — which researchers described as epidemics — continued through 2017, the most recent year for which data are available.

Gun-related deaths over the period accounted for 5.6 percent of deaths in the younger group and nearly 20 percent among older kids.

Researchers also found statistically significant increases in gun-related deaths among black children aged 5-14, starting in 2013.

Hennekens likened attempts to halt the epidemic without gun control to trying to curb lung cancer deaths due to cigarettes without reducing tobacco use.

The analysis of data from the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics also looked at causes of death among school-age children. It said 61 percent were the result of assault; 32 percent were from suicide; 5 percent were accidental; and 2 percent undetermined.

Blacks accounted for 41 percent of all deaths, and 86 percent were in boys.

The authors said the findings, published March 21 in the American Journal of Medicine, reveal significant public health and policy challenges.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on gun safety.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: March 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Heart Attacks Fall One-Third Among Older Americans

BySteven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) — A groundbreaking new study holds heartening news for older Americans.

Since the mid-1990s, the number of seniors who suffered a heart attack or died from one dropped dramatically — evidence that campaigns to prevent heart attacks and improve patient care are paying off, Yale University researchers said.

The study of more than 4 million Medicare patients found that hospitalizations for heart attacks dropped 38 percent between 1995 and 2014. At the same time, deaths within 30 days of a heart attack reached an all-time low of 12 percent, down more than one-third since 1995.

“This is really amazing progress,” said lead researcher Dr. Harlan Krumholz, a professor of cardiology.

The study looked at Medicare patients because people 65 and older have the highest risk for heart attack, and account for as many as two-thirds of them, he said.

The turnaround stems from major efforts to change people’s lifestyles to reduce heart attacks, and also to improve care so more patients survive one, Krumholz said.

Since the 1990s, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, the American Heart Association (AHA), the American College of Cardiology and other organizations have emphasized prevention.

The efforts have focused on lifestyle changes, including adoption of healthy eating habits and getting more exercise. They have also helped patients reduce their blood pressure and cholesterol, two key contributors to heart attack.

In-hospital care is also better now than it was in the 1990s, Krumholz said. Patients who arrive at the hospital with a heart attack are now treated within minutes, using procedures to open blocked arteries, rather than the hours it used to take, he noted.

And more patients are leaving the hospital with prescriptions for blood pressure drugs, aspirin and statins, which help prevent a repeat heart attack.

Though costs associated with heart attacks have increased, preventing them and improving survival ends up saving money on other health care costs, Krumholz added.

But the picture isn’t entirely rosy.

Some places have seen little or no change in heart attacks since the 1990s. These areas need special attention to improve care, Krumholz said.

Continued

In addition, the obesity epidemic, along with its associated increase in type 2 diabetes, threatens to undermine the reported gains, he added. That’s because obesity and diabetes are prime risk factors for heart attacks, raising blood pressure and damaging blood vessels.

“It’s not a time to rest on our laurels or become complacent,” Krumholz said. “We believe there are still improvements possible. We’d like to see heart attacks relegated to the history of medicine.”

Dr. John Osborne, a volunteer expert with the American Heart Association, agreed.

“It is wonderful to celebrate these advances, but still one person in the U.S. dies of cardiovascular disease every 38 seconds, and it continues to be the greatest killer of Americans,” he said. “[These are] wonderful advances in the war against heart disease, but our war is still not finished.”

AHA spokesman Dr. Gregg Fonarow said much more remains to be done.

“The majority of the myocardial infarctions [heart attacks] still occurring could be prevented with better implementation of evidence-based primary and secondary prevention strategies,” Fonarow said.

The report was published online March 15 in JAMA Network Open.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Harlan Krumholz, M.D., professor of cardiology, Yale University, New Haven, Conn.; Gregg Fonarow, M.D., spokesman, American Heart Association and director, Ahmanson-UCLA Cardiomyopathy Center, Los Angeles; John Osborne, M.D., volunteer expert, American Heart Association; March 15, 2019, JAMA Network Open, online

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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