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Black Leaf Bongs Review

When you look for high quality glass pieces, smoking accessories, and even vaporizers, you have to take a long, hard look at Black Leaf.  Based in Germany, their product offering is massive and offers a range of products from basic hand pipes to exotic styles that are one of a kind.  To me, the Black Leaf Bongs are the cornerstone of their company, and in today’s review, I’ll try to talk about why I feel this way and perhaps make you want to try a Black Leaf bong in your near future.

The Black Leaf Background

This company was founded by Ernst Meerbeck, who wanted to get his own take on glass production and artistic design into the smoking industry.  The Black Leaf Label is comprised of a growing line of smoking products that are all well represented in their uber popular retail head shop in Hennef, near Cologne, Germany.  Not ironically, the shop looks over the Hanfback River, which translates to “Hemp River.”  The store is very popular with passionate smokers of all ages.

The line of vaporizers, water pipes, hand pipes, and accessories is constantly growing and fans of the brand are always influential on what types of products the brand puts out next.  (I seriously love when brands listen to their consumers, it makes the experience so interactive rather than one way.)

Black Leaf review
You can purchase these bongs at Grass City. Click the image to view more.

You can find these bongs for sale at Grass City.  

(It’s one of my favorite places to shop for stuff like this.  Read about other online head shops here.)

Products sold by Black Leaf are affordable in addition to being high quality.

Anyone who knows Sham Wow pitch man Vince Offer knows that the Germans make good stuff!  

Vince Offer

Shane Dwyer
Author: Shane Dwyer
Shane Dwyer is a cannabis advocate who isn’t afraid to tell the world about it! You can find his views, rants, and tips published regularly at The 420 Times.

Marijuana & Cannabis News – The 420 Times

CPR Less Likely for Poor Black Kids Study Finds

By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, July 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Cardiac arrest is rare in children. But a new study finds that if it does happen, kids are less likely to get life-saving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if they’re black and living in a poor neighborhood.

In fact, these kids were much less likely to receive CPR from a bystander than white children living in any type of neighborhood, the research showed.

Children in other racial groups were also less likely to receive bystander CPR than white children, the study authors said.

Although cardiac arrest in children is far less common than in adults, each year about 7,000 children in the United States experience an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to the American Heart Association. Cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops beating properly.

Often, bystanders who know CPR techniques can rise to the rescue. Prior studies have tracked bystander CPR rates in adults, but the researchers said they believe this is the first study to focus on how race and class might affect CPR rates among children.

The team from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia analyzed data on nearly 7,100 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests that occurred in children between 2013 and 2017. Of those, 61% involved infants, 60% were boys, 31% were white kids, 31% were black kids, 10.5% were Hispanic kids and 3% were other races/ethnicities. Ethnicity was unknown in about one-quarter of the cases.

Overall, 48% of the children did receive bystander CPR. However, compared to whites, bystander CPR was 41% less likely for black kids; 22% less likely for Hispanic kids and 6% less likely among other ethnic groups.

And compared to white children, black children in majority black neighborhoods with high unemployment, low education and low median income were nearly half as likely to receive bystander CPR (nearly 60% versus 32%, respectively), the investigators found.

The study was published online July 10 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

The findings suggest there’s a crucial need for CPR training programs in poor, non-white, lower-education neighborhoods, said study lead researcher Dr. Maryam Naim. She is a pediatric cardiac intensive care physician at the hospital.

“As most bystander CPR is provided by family members, lower response rates are likely due to a lack of CPR training and recognition of cardiac arrests,” she said in a journal news release.

Teaching CPR to parents before a newborn is released from the hospital, or during pediatrician visits, would be good opportunities for such training, Naim suggested.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE:Journal of the American Heart Association, news release, July 10, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Bones Help Black People Keep Facial Aging at Bay

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Why do so many black adults continue to look youthful as they age?

A new study says it’s in their bones.

Researchers found that the facial bones of black adults retain a higher mineral content than those other races, which makes their faces less likely to reflect their advancing years.

The new study is the first to document how facial bones change as black adults age, and may help guide plastic surgeons’ work.

“It is important for plastic surgeons to understand how the facial aging process differs among racial and ethnic groups to provide the best treatment,” said study author Dr. Boris Paskhover. He is an assistant professor at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, in Newark.

For the study, his team looked at medical records of 20 black adults from 1973 and 2017. The study patients had at least two face scans taken 10 years apart.

Although all of the faces changed over time, they showed only minor changes, compared to similar studies on the aging white population.

“This finding reflects other studies that show black adults have higher bone mineral density, decreased rates of bone loss and lower rates of osteoporosis as compared to the general population,” Paskhover said in a university news release.

Facial aging results from a combination of changes to the skin, muscle, fat and bones.

As people age, the loss of mineral density causes bone loss. Bone loss can affect the shape of the nose, lower jowl area, cheekbones, and middle and lower areas of the eye sockets, the researchers explained.

“As bones change, they affect the soft tissue around them, resulting in perceived decreases in facial volume,” Paskhover said. “Treatment should consider the underlying bone structure.”

The report was published online recently in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: Rutgers University, news release, June 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

Bones Help Black People Keep Facial Aging at Bay

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 — Why do so many black adults continue to look youthful as they age?

A new study says it’s in their bones.

Researchers found that the facial bones of black adults retain a higher mineral content than those other races, which makes their faces less likely to reflect their advancing years.

The new study is the first to document how facial bones change as black adults age, and may help guide plastic surgeons’ work.

“It is important for plastic surgeons to understand how the facial aging process differs among racial and ethnic groups to provide the best treatment,” said study author Dr. Boris Paskhover. He is an assistant professor at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, in Newark.

For the study, his team looked at medical records of 20 black adults from 1973 and 2017. The study patients had at least two face scans taken 10 years apart.

Although all of the faces changed over time, they showed only minor changes, compared to similar studies on the aging white population.

“This finding reflects other studies that show black adults have higher bone mineral density, decreased rates of bone loss and lower rates of osteoporosis as compared to the general population,” Paskhover said in a university news release.

Facial aging results from a combination of changes to the skin, muscle, fat and bones.

As people age, the loss of mineral density causes bone loss. Bone loss can affect the shape of the nose, lower jowl area, cheekbones, and middle and lower areas of the eye sockets, the researchers explained.

“As bones change, they affect the soft tissue around them, resulting in perceived decreases in facial volume,” Paskhover said. “Treatment should consider the underlying bone structure.”

The report was published online recently in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

More information

Harvard Medical School has more about facial aging.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: June 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

AHA News: Director John Singleton’s Fatal Stroke Spotlights Black Americans’ Hypertension Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 1, 2019 (American Heart Association News) — Filmmaker John Singleton was hailed for his ability to portray black Americans’ lives on screen. His death drew attention to one of the biggest threats posed to those lives.

Singleton, who was nominated for an Oscar for directing “Boyz N the Hood,” suffered a stroke April 17 and died Monday after being taken off life support. He was 51. In a statement, his family said he had “quietly struggled with hypertension.”

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is often called the “silent killer” because it has no obvious symptoms. It’s the top risk factor for stroke — the No. 5 cause of death in the U.S. and an especially dangerous problem for black people.

Black men are twice as likely to have a stroke as their white adult counterparts and are nearly 60 percent more likely to die from a stroke than their white peers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Beyond being a leading cause of death, stroke is a leading cause of adult disability.

“And the part that is not mentioned as much is that it’s a leading cause of cognitive dysfunction as well. And depression,” said Dr. Bruce Ovbiagele, professor of neurology and associate dean at the University of California, San Francisco.

Although stroke mortality has fallen by 80 percent over the past 60 years, there has been no significant decrease in the disparity between white and black people.

High blood pressure might help explain some of that gap. The prevalence of high blood pressure among African Americans is among the highest in the world. More than half of black adults in the U.S. have high blood pressure.

Other risk factors for stroke include diabetes and obesity, which affect African Americans at higher rates, as well as smoking, which researchers say doubles the risk of stroke in African Americans. Sickle cell anemia is also a factor; it’s the most common genetic disorder among African Americans.

A 2017 report in the journal Circulation spelled out many additional possible influences, ranging from cultural attitudes toward exercise; the unhealthy parts of the traditional Southern diet, which is high in added fats, sugars and sodium; and the health issues that come from stress and perceived discrimination.

Black Americans are also more likely to live in poverty, statistics show. And that’s another factor, said Dr. Clyde Yancy, a professor of medicine and chief of cardiology at Northwestern University.

“In the diet that people eat, which is all they can afford — one especially represented by fast foods and high sodium intake — the risk of high blood pressure is exaggerated and the onset is much earlier in life,” Yancy said.

But scientists do not fully understand the risk gap, Ovbiagele said. Up to 30 percent of the reasons behind the increased risk for black Americans is a mystery, he estimated.

“Is it genetic? Is it an interaction between the genes and the environment?” Some research suggests lingering psychosocial effects from slavery could be factors, he said.

“There’s perceived discrimination, there’s the salt hypothesis, there’s genetics, there’s so many things,” he said, adding that many of them have not been explored thoroughly.

But that should not deter people from focusing on the many things they can control, Ovbiagele said.

“We know that stroke is eminently preventable,” he said. “So while we don’t have the entire truth, we have some of the truth, and we know that truth can be addressed.”

Yancy echoed that point emphatically.

“I want this message to be explicitly clear: Check your blood pressure. That’s a hard stop. That’s the takeaway; and especially if you’re an African American man, check it today.”

It’s urgent because high blood pressure is so pervasive and so deadly, Yancy said.

“Don’t think that these events aren’t happening every day, in every city and every state across the country,” he said. “Except it’s happening quietly — with families losing fathers and grandfathers and uncles and brothers and husbands on a daily basis.”

Yancy knows this all too well.

“I lost all nine of my uncles, aunts and father to heart disease,” he said. “And not a single one had any condition other than high blood pressure to drive their early demise.

“It’s just unacceptable. We can live life a different way.”

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: May 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Many Black Americans Live in Trauma Care ‘Deserts’

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, March 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Black neighborhoods in America’s three largest cities are much more likely to be located in a “trauma desert,” an area without immediate access to a designated trauma center, a new study finds.

Census data for neighborhoods in New York City, Chicago and Los Angeles revealed that neighborhoods made up of mostly black residents are more often 5 miles or more away from a trauma center, compared with white or Hispanic neighborhoods, researchers said.

“We found that black neighborhoods were the only neighborhoods that were consistently in trauma deserts,” said lead researcher Dr. Elizabeth Tung, an internal medicine and primary care instructor with University of Chicago Medicine.

This means that medical care for stabbings, shootings and beatings is lacking in the urban areas most affected by violent crime, the researchers said.

Tung’s team noted that the rate of violent crime in rural Thurmont, Md., is five victims for every 10,000 people. The rate just 60 miles away, in urban Baltimore, is more than 25 times higher.

“When you think about who needs access to these services, it’s really the poor inner-city neighborhoods, and those are the neighborhoods least likely to have access,” Tung said.

Previous studies have associated urban trauma care deserts — or regions located more than 5 miles from a trauma center — with higher transport times and an increased risk of death, according to background notes in the study published online March 8 in JAMA Network Open.

For the new study, the investigators analyzed data from the 2015 American Community Survey, an annual research effort by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The researchers used the survey to assess the racial makeup of specific neighborhoods in the three largest U.S. cities. They found large proportions of majority-black neighborhoods in Chicago (35 percent) and New York City (21 percent), but not in Los Angeles (3 percent).

The investigators then compared the location of those neighborhoods to the sites of adult level I and level II trauma centers within the three cities.

Continued

The findings showed that black-majority neighborhoods were eight times more likely to be located in a trauma care desert in Chicago and five times more likely in Los Angeles. They also were nearly twice as likely in New York City to be in a trauma care desert, in models adjusting for poverty and race.

Interestingly, Hispanic-majority neighborhoods did not consistently have the same problem. They were actually less likely to be located in a trauma care desert in New York City and Los Angeles, and slightly more likely in Chicago, according to the report.

Many “safety net” trauma hospitals in poorer urban areas have shut down or scaled back operations over the years, as welfare and Medicaid funding have tightened, Tung said. This makes emergency care less available to people in those neighborhoods.

Examples include Michael Reese Hospital on the south side of Chicago, which closed in 1991 due to economic hardship, and Martin Luther King Jr. Hospital in Los Angeles, which lost its trauma center designation in 2004, the researchers noted.

On the other hand, activists in New York City rallied around Harlem Hospital and headed off its closure twice, which could explain why the Big Apple’s black communities are not as likely to be in a trauma care desert, Tung said.

It’s not cheap to operate a trauma center, said Dr. Lisa Marie Knowlton, an assistant professor of surgery at Stanford University Medical Center.

“The process of accreditation and maintenance of certification for level I trauma hospitals is a rigorous and costly process, and although many safety-net hospitals in urban settings provide level I care, they are already at financial risk,” said Knowlton, who wrote an editorial accompanying the new study.

“The tremendous cost to the hospital and system for providing care to vulnerable uninsured patients who lack adequate post-discharge resources places any hospital in these urban environments at risk,” Knowlton explained.

Physical proximity isn’t the only measure used to assess an area’s access to emergency care, said Dr. Rade Vukmir, a critical care specialist in Traverse City, Mich., who is also a fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians.

Continued

“The question of how long does it take to get to emergency care is really the underpinning of what we do. In a rural environment, it’s a distance problem,” Vukmir said. “In a suburban and sometimes urban environment, it’s a congestion problem,” as ambulances battle traffic to deliver patients to a hospital.

Tung and Knowlton pointed out that providing better emergency care to neighborhoods in trauma care deserts will involve large-scale policy changes and programs.

“Additional state and federal funds should be allocated toward the provision of emergency services, including trauma care, regardless of patients’ ability to pay,” Knowlton said. “Further subsidization of safety-net hospitals providing critical services to high-risk patients in urban settings is warranted.”

Medicaid expansion could prove crucial in expanding funding to struggling urban hospitals, Knowlton added.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Elizabeth Tung, M.D., internal medicine and primary care instructor, University of Chicago Medicine; Lisa Marie Knowlton, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, Calif.; Rade Vukmir, M.D., critical care specialist, Traverse City, Mich., and fellow, American College of Emergency Physicians; March 8, 2019,JAMA Network Open,  online

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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AHA News: Post-Stroke Depression Common Among Black, Hispanic Survivors