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How to Keep Your Bones Strong and Prevent Fractures

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 — If you’re a young adult, start thinking about your bone health, an expert advises.

Most people reach peak bone mass — the strongest bones they’ll ever have — between 25 and 30 years of age, according to Dr. Philip Bosha, a physician with Penn State Sports Medicine in State College, Pa.

“To some extent, genetics determines the peak, but lifestyle influences, such as diet and exercise, are also factors,” Bosha said in a Penn State news release.

According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, bone mass starts to slowly decrease after age 40. Taking 1,000 milligrams of calcium and 1,000 International Units (IU) of vitamin D a day can help maintain your bones. You should also do weight-bearing exercises such as running and brisk walking, as well as resistance training to maintain bone and muscle strength.

After age 50, the daily recommended calcium intake for men remains 1,000 milligrams per day, but rises to 1,200 milligrams for women, including those who are entering or have gone through menopause.

Declining estrogen levels due to menopause can lead to rapid bone loss. All women 65 and older — and those between 60 and 64 who have an increased risk of fractures — should get a bone density study, according to Bosha.

“If the bone density study shows osteoporosis, it may be reasonable to start taking a medication called a bisphosphonate, which you can get in a variety of forms,” he said. “Some are pills taken on a weekly or monthly basis and other varieties can be taken intravenously.”

Other medications to improve bone density include calcitonin, which can be used as a nasal spray; parathyroid hormone, which is taken by injection; and medications called selective estrogen receptor modulators.

Bosha said men and women who are 70 and older should take 1,200 milligrams of calcium per day and 800 IU of vitamin D. At this age, men become far more likely to have lower bone density, increasing their risk of fractures. Some men should consider a bone density study, Bosha said.

“For people of this age, avoiding falls is crucial,” he said. “Maintaining balance and muscle strength through exercise and maintaining strong bones through adequate calcium and vitamin D intake can help decrease the risk of severe fractures from falls.”

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more on bone health.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: September 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Could Antibacterial Triclosan Weaken Women’s Bones?

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, June 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Triclosan, a chemical commonly added to a myriad of consumer products to kill bacteria, may be bad for women’s bones, a new study suggests.

“We found that higher triclosan levels in urine were associated with lower bone mineral density in the femur and lumbar spine and increased the risk for osteoporosis in U.S. women, especially postmenopausal women,” said lead researcher Yingjun Li, from Hangzhou Medical College School of Public Health in China.

Triclosan has been shown to affect bone mineral density in cells and in animals, Li added, but this is the first evidence in humans that it can have the same effect.

Triclosan is widely used in a variety of products including soaps, toothpaste and mouthwash. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned the chemical from hand sanitizers, it’s still used in other products.

Because the researchers looked at women who were exposed to triclosan, as well as many other chemicals, during their lives, this study cannot prove that triclosan caused osteoporosis.

According to the FDA, triclosan has been linked to reduced levels of some thyroid hormones and to an added risk of making some bacteria resistant to antibiotics.

Neither of these risks, however, have been conclusively proven, the agency says.

“The data that triclosan alters bone biochemistry seems reasonable,” said Bruce Hammock, a professor of entomology at the University of California, Davis.

But it is a stretch to say that the exposure most people get can cause this, he added.

Hammock said that people have to look at the benefits of triclosan to determine if the potential risks are worth taking. That’s the best way to judge any chemical, he said.

“If it offers no benefit, as it is in most cases with triclosan, any exposure gives you risk without benefit, so it should be avoided,” Hammock said.

For the study, Li and colleagues collected data on nearly 1,900 women who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2005 and 2010.

Continued

They found that women with high levels of triclosan in their urine were more likely to have weakening of their bones.

The Personal Care Products Council, an industry group, noted the study had several limitations, including not proving a cause-and-effect link, taking only a single sample of urine from the women, and reporting an effect that was just barely of statistical significance.

Not only that, “the authors acknowledge that ‘Future prospective studies are needed to validate the findings,'” Linda Loretz, chief toxicologist with the council, said in a statement.

However, even though the health risks tied to triclosan haven’t been proven, another expert still believes you should avoid it when possible.

“This study provides cautionary data on yet another potential adverse health outcome from exposure to the overused antimicrobial triclosan,” said Rolf Halden, director of the Biodesign Center for Environmental Health Engineering at Arizona State University.

Consumers can limit their exposure to triclosan by not using toothpaste containing triclosan and by avoiding antimicrobial consumer products laced with triclosan, including clothes, kitchenware, office and school supplies, carpets and workstation surfaces, he said.

“Even after the recent ban of triclosan from most personal care products by the FDA, opportunities for unwanted human exposure abound from a large spectrum of consumer products containing significant quantities of this risky antimicrobial compound,” Halden said.

The report was published online June 25 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Yingjun Li, Ph.D., Hangzhou Medical College School of Public Health, Hangzhou, China; Rolf Halden, Ph.D., professor and director, BiodesignCenter for Environmental Health Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe; Bruce Hammock, Ph.D., professor, entomology, University of California, Davis; June 24, 2019, statement, Personal Care Products Council; June 25, 2019,Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, online

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Pagination

WebMD Health

Bones Help Black People Keep Facial Aging at Bay

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Why do so many black adults continue to look youthful as they age?

A new study says it’s in their bones.

Researchers found that the facial bones of black adults retain a higher mineral content than those other races, which makes their faces less likely to reflect their advancing years.

The new study is the first to document how facial bones change as black adults age, and may help guide plastic surgeons’ work.

“It is important for plastic surgeons to understand how the facial aging process differs among racial and ethnic groups to provide the best treatment,” said study author Dr. Boris Paskhover. He is an assistant professor at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, in Newark.

For the study, his team looked at medical records of 20 black adults from 1973 and 2017. The study patients had at least two face scans taken 10 years apart.

Although all of the faces changed over time, they showed only minor changes, compared to similar studies on the aging white population.

“This finding reflects other studies that show black adults have higher bone mineral density, decreased rates of bone loss and lower rates of osteoporosis as compared to the general population,” Paskhover said in a university news release.

Facial aging results from a combination of changes to the skin, muscle, fat and bones.

As people age, the loss of mineral density causes bone loss. Bone loss can affect the shape of the nose, lower jowl area, cheekbones, and middle and lower areas of the eye sockets, the researchers explained.

“As bones change, they affect the soft tissue around them, resulting in perceived decreases in facial volume,” Paskhover said. “Treatment should consider the underlying bone structure.”

The report was published online recently in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: Rutgers University, news release, June 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

Bones Help Black People Keep Facial Aging at Bay

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 — Why do so many black adults continue to look youthful as they age?

A new study says it’s in their bones.

Researchers found that the facial bones of black adults retain a higher mineral content than those other races, which makes their faces less likely to reflect their advancing years.

The new study is the first to document how facial bones change as black adults age, and may help guide plastic surgeons’ work.

“It is important for plastic surgeons to understand how the facial aging process differs among racial and ethnic groups to provide the best treatment,” said study author Dr. Boris Paskhover. He is an assistant professor at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, in Newark.

For the study, his team looked at medical records of 20 black adults from 1973 and 2017. The study patients had at least two face scans taken 10 years apart.

Although all of the faces changed over time, they showed only minor changes, compared to similar studies on the aging white population.

“This finding reflects other studies that show black adults have higher bone mineral density, decreased rates of bone loss and lower rates of osteoporosis as compared to the general population,” Paskhover said in a university news release.

Facial aging results from a combination of changes to the skin, muscle, fat and bones.

As people age, the loss of mineral density causes bone loss. Bone loss can affect the shape of the nose, lower jowl area, cheekbones, and middle and lower areas of the eye sockets, the researchers explained.

“As bones change, they affect the soft tissue around them, resulting in perceived decreases in facial volume,” Paskhover said. “Treatment should consider the underlying bone structure.”

The report was published online recently in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

More information

Harvard Medical School has more about facial aging.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: June 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Pooch Peril: More Elderly Are Fracturing Bones While Dog Walking