Menu

Umbilical Cord ‘Milking’ Dangerous for Preemies

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Nov. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Squeezing the last drops of blood from the umbilical cord has been touted to help preterm babies get more of the nutrients they need, but it may be dangerous, a new study finds.

When umbilical cord blood is forced into the baby’s abdomen, the pressure can cause tiny blood vessels in the brain to rupture. This is especially dangerous for the most preterm infants, the researchers said.

The study, funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, was stopped due to the heightened risk of internal bleeding.

In the study, researchers wanted to see if so-called “cord milking” was a good alternative to delayed cord clamping. Delayed clamping lets cord blood flow into the infant at a natural pace.

“Most doctors try delayed cord clamping when they can, and they occasionally will do the cord milking,” said lead researcher Dr. Anup Katheria, a neonatologist at Sharp Mary Birch Hospital for Women and Newborns, in San Diego, Calif.

Babies who get cord blood aren’t just getting blood, he said.

“These babies are getting stem cells and other cells that might help them develop a little bit better than babies that don’t receive this extra blood,” Katheria said. “They also get iron, which is a potent nutrient for brain development, and there’s probably other things in the blood that might help these babies.”

But, given these findings, he that said cord milking should be avoided in extremely preterm babies, those born at 23 to 27 weeks of pregnancy.

For the study, Katheria’s team recruited women who were pregnant for less than 32 weeks and were at risk for preterm delivery. They were randomly assigned to umbilical cord milking or a 60-second delay in cord clamping.

The team had planned to enroll 1,500 infants (750 in each group). Because the study was cut short, only 474 babies were included, according to the report.

Among infants who had cord milking 12% died or developed severe brain bleeds, compared with 8% in the delayed-clamping group. The researchers said this difference wasn’t statistically significant.

Continued

Neither was the death rate at 7% in the cord-milking group and 6% in the delayed-clamping group.

But the rate of severe brain bleeding was significantly higher among babies who had cord milking (8%) versus those who had delayed clamping (3%), the findings showed.

The greatest risk for severe brain bleeding was among infants born in the 23rd to 27th weeks of pregnancy, the study found. All 20 babies in the cord-milking group who suffered brain bleeds were born at this stage of pregnancy.

Among infants born at 28 to 32 weeks, none in the cord-milking group had bleeding, compared with three in the delayed-clamping group, which was not a significant difference, the researchers said.

Because the risk of brain bleeding was seen only in extremely preterm infants, Katheria’s team is continuing to compare cord milking to delayed clamping in babies born at 30 to 32 weeks’ gestation to see if either procedure will affect development as they grow. The infants will be evaluated at 2 years of age.

An earlier study of preemies delivered by cesarean section suggested that cord milking benefited preemies’ brain development.

Dr. Saima Aftab is medical director of the Fetal Care Center at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital in Miami. She said, “The current recommendation is that for preterm infants, delayed cord clamping is safe and should be done.”

This study shows that cord milking isn’t safe and “people should abandon that practice,” Aftab added.

The report was published Nov. 19 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Anup Katheria, M.D., neonatologist, Sharp Mary Birch Hospital for Women and Newborns, San Diego, Calif.; Saima Aftab, M.D., medical director, Fetal Care Center, Nicklaus Children’s Hospital, Miami; Nov. 19, 2019,Journal of the American Medical Association

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

Pagination

WebMD Health

Lawn Mowers May Be Even More Dangerous for Rural Kids

FRIDAY, Oct. 25, 2019 — Lawn mowers are always a hazard around children, but a new study suggests that kids in rural areas are at the highest risk.

Each year, more than 9,000 children in the United States are treated in emergency departments for lawn mower-related injuries.

“Despite efforts within the health community to highlight how easily children can be injured by lawn mowers, we still see thousands of children in emergency departments each year for lawn mower-related injuries,” said researcher Ronit Shah, a medical student at the University of Toledo in Ohio.

In this study, researchers analyzed data on patients under the age of 18 with lawn mower-related injuries who were seen at 49 U.S. hospitals from 2005 to 2017.

Rural areas had much higher rates of such injuries, younger patients, and higher rates of amputations, surgical complications and infections.

Injury rates were 7.3 injuries per 100,000 cases in rural areas, compared with 1.5 injuries per 100,000 cases in urban areas.

By region, the highest injury rate was in the South (2.7 injuries per 100,000 cases), followed by the Midwest (2.2 injuries per 100,000 cases) and the Northeast (1.3 injuries per 100,000 cases). The Western United States had the lowest rate at 0.6 injuries per 100,000 cases.

Lawn mower-related injuries in rural areas required longer hospital stays, had higher rates of surgical complications (5.5% vs 2.6%), and occurred in younger patients.

Amputation rates were 15.5% in rural areas and 9.6% in urban areas, with rural patients being 1.7 times more likely to have an amputation.

In rural areas, children younger than 10 had a higher rate of more severe injuries, longer hospital stays, and greater health care costs than children older than 10.

The findings will be presented by researchers on Sunday at the American Academy of Pediatrics annual meeting, in New Orleans. Such research is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

“Our research shows young children in rural areas are more likely to be severely hurt,” Shah said in an academy news release.

More public education about children and lawn mower safety is needed and “should be specifically targeted for rural communities, especially in the Southern and Midwestern United States,” he added.

More information

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has more on lawn mower safety.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: October 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Dangerous Sesame Allergy Affects Many Americans

FRIDAY, Aug. 2 , 2019 — More than 1.5 million children and adults in the United States have sesame allergy — more than previously believed, a new study finds.

And even though sesame allergy can cause severe reactions, sesame is often not declared on food product labels, the Northwestern University researchers said.

In the United States, sesame labeling is not required by law as it is with eight other allergens: peanut, milk, shellfish, tree nuts, egg, wheat, soy and finfish, along with proteins derived from them.

Also, sesame labeling is often confusing. For example, it may be labeled as tahini, a sesame seed paste. This increases the risk of accidental consumption.

“It is important to advocate for labeling sesame in packaged food. Sesame is in a lot of foods as hidden ingredients. It is very hard to avoid,” study lead author Dr. Ruchi Gupta said in a university news release. She is director of the Center for Food Allergy and Asthma Research at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

The study comes as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is weighing whether to add sesame to the list of food allergens requiring mandatory product labeling. This is something that’s done in the European Union and Australia.

The researchers conducted a telephone and online survey of more than 80,000 children and adults in 50,000 U.S. households. They asked about any suspected food allergies, including specific reaction symptoms and diagnosis of food allergies.

Based on the survey results, the researchers concluded that more than 1.5 million children and adults have a sesame allergy, and more than 1.1 million have either a physician-diagnosed sesame allergy or a history of sesame-allergic reaction symptoms.

The researchers also concluded that many people who report sesame allergies and have potentially severe allergic reactions do not have their allergy diagnosed.

“Clinical confirmation of suspected food allergies is essential to reduce the risk of unnecessary allergen avoidance as well as ensure patients receive essential counseling and prescription of emergency epinephrine,” said study first author Christopher Warren. He’s an investigator with the Center for Food Allergy and Asthma Research.

Sesame allergy affects children and adults at similar rates, unlike milk or egg allergies, which often appear early in life and are no longer present by the teens, the researchers noted.

Also, 4 in 5 people with sesame allergy have at least one other food allergy. More than half have a peanut allergy; a third have tree nut allergy; a quarter have egg allergy, and 1 in 5 have cow’s milk allergy, according to the researchers.

The study was published Aug. 2 in the journal JAMA Network Open.

More information

Food Allergy Research & Education has more on sesame allergy.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: August 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Some Meds and Driving a Dangerous Duo

SATURDAY, July 27, 2019 — Be careful about what medications you take before you get behind the wheel.

Most drugs won’t affect your ability to drive, but some prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines can cause side effects that make it unsafe to drive, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

Those side effects can include: sleepiness/drowsiness, blurred vision, dizziness, slowed movement, fainting, inability to focus or pay attention, nausea and excitability.

Some medicines can affect your driving ability for just a short time after you take them, but the effects of others can last for several hours, or even into the next day.

Some medicine labels warn to not operate heavy machinery when taking them, and this includes driving a car, the FDA said in a news release.

There are a number of types of medications — or any combination of them — that can make it dangerous to drive or operate any type of vehicle whether a car, bus, train, plane or boat.

These drugs include: opioid pain relievers; prescription drugs for anxiety (for example, benzodiazepines); antiseizure drugs (antiepileptic drugs); antipsychotic drugs; some antidepressants; products that contain codeine; some cold remedies and allergy products such as antihistamines (both prescription and OTC); sleeping pills; muscle relaxants; medicines to treat or control symptoms of diarrhea or motion sickness; diet pills; “stay awake” drugs, and other medications with stimulants (such as caffeine, ephedrine, pseudoephedrine).

Also, never drive when you’ve combined medication and alcohol, the FDA stressed.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist about medication side effects, including those that interfere with driving, and/or ask for printed information about the side effects of any new medicine.

To manage or minimize medication side effects that can affect driving, your health care provider may be able to adjust your dose, adjust the timing of when you take the medicine, or change the medicine to one that causes fewer side effects, the FDA said.

Always follow a medication’s directions for use and read warnings on the packaging or on handouts provided by the pharmacy.

Tell your health care provider about all health products you are taking, including prescription, non-prescription and herbal products, and also about any reactions you experience.

Don’t stop using a medicine unless told to do so by your doctor, the FDA said.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more on medications and driving.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: July 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Chinese Scientists Cut Local Numbers of Dangerous Mosquito by 94%

WEDNESDAY, July 17, 2019 — Some mosquitoes spread diseases to humans through their bite, passing along harmful pathogens like Zika, dengue fever, West Nile virus and chikungunya.

Now humans are turning the tables, infecting these dangerous mosquitoes with bacteria that sabotage their ability to spawn.

Chinese researchers were able to reduce these mosquito populations by as much as 94% using a bacteria-based strategy that interferes with the insects’ reproductive cycle.

“In principle, all the mosquito-borne diseases, including dengue, malaria, West Nile, chikungunya and filariasis, can be controlled using this technology,” said senior researcher Zhiyong Xi. He is director of the Sun Yat-sen University/Michigan State University Joint Center of Vector Control for Tropical Diseases. “There will be none of those diseases without transmission by mosquitoes.”

The mosquito control strategy hinges on bacteria called Wolbachia, which can affect the reproductive biology of mosquitoes, said Peter Armbruster, a professor of biology at Georgetown University, in Washington, D.C.

Essentially, a male mosquito carrying a specific strain of Wolbachia cannot successfully reproduce if the female is infected with a different strain of Wolbachia, explained Armbruster, who wrote an editorial accompanying the report in the July 17 issue of the journal Nature.

The Chinese research team created a lab-based colony of mosquitoes that all carry a newly developed combination of three Wolbachia strains. This hybrid strain doesn’t occur in the wild. The colony produced around 10 million male mosquitoes a week, Xi said.

The male mosquitoes were then released into the wild, in areas designated for pest control.

“They mate with wild females and then the wild females produce inviable eggs,” Armbruster said. “It’s a way of letting the males do the work by finding the females and preventing them from reproducing.”

The researchers also treated the mosquitoes with a low dose of radiation, enough to sterilize any accidentally released females carrying the triple bacteria strain but not enough to impair the male mosquitoes’ reproductive drive. This helped speed up laboratory production of the mosquitoes, Armbruster explained.

Field trials focused on Aedes albopictus mosquitoes were able to drive populations down by around 83% to 94%, with no wild mosquitoes detected for up to six weeks after release, the researchers reported.

Dr. Amesh Adalja is a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security in Baltimore. “Mosquitoes have long been a scourge of mankind and their effective control is one of the most daunting tasks in infectious diseases,” he said.

“Exploiting the phenomenon of mating incompatibility through male mosquito Wolbachia infections, combined with irradiation, is an elegant solution that this study demonstrates is feasible,” Adalja said.

At least one American company, MosquitoMate, is already using a similar bacteria-based approach to control mosquitoes, Armbruster noted. The innovation in the study was the combination of three different Wolbachia strains and the use of radiation to make sorting and releasing mosquitoes an easier process.

You don’t want to release both male and female mosquitoes with the triple strain, because they’ll be able to successfully mate. Until now, lab technicians have had to run the mosquito swarms through a machine that separated males from females, and then do a second hand-sort to make sure all the females had been removed, Armbruster said.

Because the approach targets specific disease-carrying species of mosquitoes, it will not wipe out other benign mosquito populations that co-exist in the same area, Xi added.

“As mating happens only within the same species, this is a species-specific control tool, without any impact on non-target species,” Xi said. “The majority of mosquito species in nature are not disease vectors, and thus will not be targeted by our technique.”

These field tests released the lab-infected male mosquitoes on two small islands located on rivers that run through Guangzhou, the city with the highest dengue transmission rate in China, the study authors said.

The goal was to reach a 5-to-1 ratio of infected males versus wild males, to effectively suppress the mosquito populations, Xi said.

Further research will be needed to see if the same laboratory production techniques could be used to battle mosquitoes in large U.S. cities, Armbruster said.

“It’s still an open question whether this is scalable to a major metropolitan area,” Armbruster said.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about mosquito control.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: July 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

When Healthy Eating Becomes a Dangerous Obsession

By Cara Roberts Murez

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) — When eating healthy becomes an around-the-clock obsession, it could be a sign of trouble.

An extreme preoccupation with clean eating is an eating order called orthorexia nervosa. Though less well-known than anorexia nervosa or bulimia — and not as well-documented — a new study review says orthorexia can also have serious emotional and physical consequences.

“Orthorexia is really more than just healthy eating,” said review co-author Jennifer Mills, an associate professor of health at York University in Toronto. “It’s healthy eating taken to the extreme, where it’s starting to cause problems for people in their lives and starting to feel quite out of control.”

The review of published research from around the world on the disorder was recently published in the journal Appetite.

Mills and her colleague Sarah McComb looked at risk factors and links between orthorexia and other mental disorders. Orthorexia, unlike some other eating disorders, is not yet recognized in the standard psychiatric manuals.

Healthy eating to the extreme

No clear line divides healthy eating from orthorexia’s extreme eating.

The foods someone with orthorexia might avoid are the same as those someone with healthy habits might avoid — such as preservatives, anything artificial, salt, sugar, fat, dairy, other animal products, genetically modified foods or those that aren’t organic.

It boils down to whether avoiding foods leads to obsession — excessive time and energy thinking and fretting about what to eat. Some people may eliminate numerous categories of food and eat only a very small number of things. People with orthorexia are typically less concerned about cutting calories than with the perceived quality of their food.

“They often are taking more and more time thinking about the foods they’re needing to purchase, particular foods, that makes it really difficult for them to just live their lives,” said Lauren Smolar, who wasn’t involved with the review. She is director of programs for the nonprofit National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA). “It can result in malnutrition or weight loss in a really difficult and potentially dangerous way.”

Continued

A person with orthorexia might be so focused on types of food and how that food is prepared that it becomes impossible to eat anything not made at home.

“It can lead to all kinds of related problems, like isolation, or not being able to eat at other people’s houses or not being able to eat in a restaurant for fear that the food won’t have been prepared in a very pure, clean way,” Mills said. “Those are the kinds of things that might lead someone to feel that it’s taking over their life.”

Cultural trends could be fueling those fears, Mills said. With the internet and social media, people have unlimited access to information — some of it good and some not based on scientific evidence.

Eating trends that restrict certain foods are concerning, said Smolar, who added that dieting is one of the biggest triggers for eating disorders. All foods are good in moderation, she said, and a diverse diet is best.

Though many think of eating disorders as a problem affecting young women, orthorexia appears to be experienced equally by men and women, the study found.

People who follow a vegan or vegetarian diet or who have a poor body image are at a higher risk.

For some, the underlying cause is another eating disorder, and clean eating is seen as a socially acceptable way to restrict calories, Mills said. For others, obsessive-compulsive or anxiety disorder may manifest in the need to eat in this very rigid way.

“In that sense it is very similar to what we see in other kinds of obsessive-compulsive disorder, where somebody might be afraid that they’re going to get sick or they’re going to be getting exposed to germs if they don’t wash their hands enough or if they don’t do something in a very particular way,” Mills said.

Getting help

Orthorexia should be taken seriously, Mills said. Talk to your primary care doctor about any concerns. Meeting with a psychologist who specializes in anxiety disorders, eating disorders or body image also can be helpful, she said.

Continued

NEDA offers an online screening tool that assesses risk and a helpline where you can talk through concerns and learn about resources.

“As awareness grows, more people are recognizing symptoms and seeking opportunities for help,” Smolar said. “It’s something that I think we still have a lot to learn about.”

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Jennifer Mills, Ph.D., associate professor, health, York University, Toronto, Canada; Lauren Smolar, M.A., director, programs, National Eating Disorders Association;Appetite, online, May 3, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

Pagination

WebMD Health

Violent Video Games, Unlocked Guns a Dangerous Combo

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Shoot ’em up video games might be making your children far too comfortable with how they approach and handle real-life firearms, a new study argues.

Kids who played a version of Minecraft featuring guns were much more likely to handle a happened-upon but unloaded firearm than kids whose Minecraft game featured swords or no weapons at all, researchers found.

Worse, those kids were also more likely to point the gun at themselves or a playmate and pull the trigger, said lead researcher Brad Bushman, chair of mass communication at Ohio State University.

“This is not a game that is bloody or gory,” Bushman said of Minecraft, “so you have to wonder how more realistic shooting games would affect children’s perceptions regarding the safety of firearms.”

For the study, 250 kids aged 8 to 12 spent 20 minutes playing specially designed versions of Minecraft, a game known for its distinctively blocky, pixelated graphics.

Kids were paired with another playmate and randomly assigned to play one of three versions of Minecraft — one in which guns were used to kill monsters, another where swords were used, and a third that was utterly nonviolent and featured neither weapons nor monsters.

After 20 minutes of play, the children were sent to another room stocked with toys. The room also included a cabinet containing two disabled 9 mm handguns.

There were 220 children in the study who came across the handguns while playing, and what they did after finding the firearms is telling.

About 62% of kids who played Minecraft featuring guns touched the handgun, compared with 57% of the kids who had swords in their video game and 44% of those who played a nonviolent video game, researchers report.

What’s more, twice as many kids who played with crude video game guns wound up aiming the real-life firearm and pulling the trigger at either themselves or their playmate.

About 3% of kids exposed to gun violence in Minecraft pulled the trigger of the real handgun, compared with 1.4% of kids who had video game swords and only 0.14% who played the nonviolent game.

Continued

Roughly 1 in every 5 children notified an adult about the firearm, the study discovered. About 6% told an adult without touching the gun, as kids are told to do, and another 16% told an adult but also touched the gun.

The results show how important it is for parents to monitor their children’s video game playing, Bushman said.

“You don’t let your kids eat junk food. The same should be true for media,” Bushman said. “You shouldn’t let them consume junky media.”

The new results jibe with a 2017 study of his, which found that kids who watched movies featuring gun violence were more likely to handle and use guns, Bushman added.

Nearly 1,300 children younger than 18 die every year from shootings, and about 5,800 are treated for gunshot wounds, according to a 2017 study in Pediatrics.

Although it’s important to monitor kids’ media diet, it’s even more crucial to safely store firearms out of the hands of children, said Cassandra Crifasi, an assistant professor with the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research.

Even before video games existed, kids played with toy firearms — water guns or cap guns or finger guns or guns imagined from bits of fallen wood, said Crifasi, who wasn’t involved with the study.

“Kids are innately curious and they’re going to play with these things, so I think it’s important we separate kids from firearms when they aren’t supervised,” Crifasi said. “We know from some national survey data we’ve done that only 55% of homes with children store their guns safely.”

The best way to keep children safe is to remove all guns from the home, according to Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

Guns kept in the house should always be unloaded and locked, stored out of reach and sight of children. Ammunition should always be stored separately.

The new study was published May 31 in the journal JAMA Network Open.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Brad Bushman, Ph.D., chair, mass communication, Ohio State University; Cassandra Crifasi, Ph.D., assistant professor, Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research, Baltimore; May 31, 2019,JAMA Network Open

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

Pagination

WebMD Health

Are DIY Sunscreens Dangerous?

By Alan Mozes

HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Interest in homemade sunscreens is hot, but many of these do-it-yourself brews lack effective sun protection, a new study warns.

Researchers found that only about one-third of homemade sunscreens on the popular information-sharing website Pinterest specified how much sun protection factor (SPF) each “natural” sunblock contained. In some cases, SPF content dipped as low as 2 — far below recommended guidelines for preventing premature aging and skin cancer.

Overall, about seven out of 10 sunscreen recipes failed to adequately protect skin from dangerous ultraviolet (UV) rays, the study authors found.

“It is a great sign that consumers are paying attention to what is in their products,” said study author Julie Merten. She is an associate professor with the University of North Florida’s Brooks College of Health.

But she and her colleagues are cautioning do-it-yourselfers to be mindful that if “they do use Pinterest to make their own sunscreen, to be sure it is a formula that offers true broadband protection.”

Unlike commercial sunscreens, the Pinterest recipes aren’t tested or regulated, and could cause harm, Merten and others said.

Merten acknowledged there are “legitimate concerns” about some commercial sunscreens, including reef habitat destruction and hormone-disrupting chemicals. These “align with a societal shift toward more natural and organic products,” she noted.

Recently, a study from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), raised concerns regarding four common commercial-sunscreen chemicals: oxybenzone, avobenzone, octocrylene and ecamsule.

All four chemicals were found to have entered the users’ bloodstreams at levels far exceeding U.S. Food and Drug Administration safety thresholds.

Still, the UCSF study team did not conclude that anyone’s health was at risk. And some experts believe any concerns that might be raised are outweighed by the anti-cancer and anti-aging benefits of FDA-approved sunscreens.

One of those experts is Dr. Steven Wang, director of dermatology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, in Basking Ridge, N.J.

“There’s tons of scientific data that sunscreen with SPF of at least 15 reduces the risk for both melanomas and squamous cell cancer, and prevents wrinkles and pigmentation. That’s the benefit,” said Wang.

Continued

“But in terms of why people would even think about making a sunscreen at home, I think that is probably based less on science than on fear,” he said.

These are not easy products to make, according to Wang, who is also chair of the Skin Cancer Foundation’s photobiology committee. “Some of the filters they contain are water-soluble, while others are oil-soluble. So molecules can separate, and the end result won’t deliver the protection you’re after. You can’t just whip it together,” he explained.

Using a do-it-yourself sunscreen that doesn’t work could be more dangerous than using nothing at all, he warned. That’s because “when you put oil on your skin without any blockers, you actually allow the UV rays to penetrate deeply into your skin,” Wang said.

Merten said that could make users vulnerable to sunburn.

The bottom-line? People should be “very thorough in their research if they decide to use homemade sunscreens, and to use ingredients such as zinc and titanium oxide with proven UV blocking ability,” Merten said.

The FDA recommends sunscreens with an SPF of 15 or more, while the American Academy of Dermatology’s recommended minimum is SPF 30.

Most experts advise applying sunscreen a half hour before heading outdoors. Reapply at least every two hours, more often if you’re swimming or sweating.

The report was published in the May 20 issue of Health Communication.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Julie Williams Merten, Ph.D., associate professor, public health, department of public health, University of North Florida, Brooks College of Health, Jacksonville; Steven Wang, M.D., director, dermatologic surgery and dermatology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Basking Ridge, N.J., and chair, photobiology committee, Skin Cancer Foundation; May 20, 2019,Health Communication

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

Pagination

WebMD Health

Could Your Apple Watch Spot Dangerous A-Fib?

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Dec. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — That shiny new Apple Watch you got this holiday could potentially alert you to heart trouble you didn’t know you had.

The watch contains a simple electrocardiogram (ECG) that tracks your heart rhythm and can detect the presence of atrial fibrillation (“A-fib”), an irregular heartbeat that increases your risk for stroke and heart failure.

More than 400,000 Apple Watch wearers have enrolled in a Stanford University-led study to determine how accurately the wearable technology detects the condition.

“It’s a unique study that is driven by consumers,” said Dr. Matthew Martinez, chair of the American College of Cardiology’s Sports and Exercise Cardiology Council. “I think it’s going to give us a lot of great information.”

At least one person says the Apple Watch already has alerted him to the potentially dangerous irregular heartbeat.

Ed Dentel, a 46-year-old man from Richmond, Va., updated the software on his Apple Watch earlier this month and was shocked when its ECG app immediately pinged him, he told ABC News.

“The application on the launch sounded off right away with atrial fibrillation — not something I’ve ever heard of, but since I’m in pretty decent health and never had a problem before, I didn’t give it much thought,” Dentel said. “I figured something was glitchy, so I set everything down and turned in for the night.”

The watch pinged again when Dentel put it on over breakfast the next morning. He drove to a nearby urgent care center, where doctors confirmed the watch’s report.

“I was dealing with a case of atrial fibrillation that I never knew I had and probably wouldn’t have known anytime soon,” Dentel said.

A-fib occurs when abnormal electrical impulses causes the top chambers of the heart, the atria, to quiver and spasm.

Blood can pool in heart chambers affected by a-fib, increasing the risk of stroke-causing blood clots. People with a-fib often are prescribed blood thinners.

Apple says its watch contains optical sensors and built-in electrodes that measure your blood flow and the electrical signals from your heart. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration in September announced that it had cleared two medical apps created by Apple to work on the watch.

Continued

But the device is not sophisticated enough to detect more complex heart problems, said Dr. John Rumsfeld, the American College of Cardiology’s chief innovation officer.

“It’s not going to tell you whether or not you’re having a heart attack or stroke. It’s not going to predict whether or not you’re going to get heart disease later in life,” Rumsfeld said. “It’s not meant to go beyond your heart rhythm.”

Further, anyone who gets a troubling reading from the watch needs to see their doctor for further assessment, he added.

“We are going to have to confirm it,” Rumsfeld said. “This is not a medical device. This is a consumer health device. It could give you a signal, but that won’t mean you have a problem. You will have to get it checked out.”

However, both Martinez and Rumsfeld believe that the Apple Watch is a harbinger of things to come, in terms of wearable technology that helps track your health. The watch costs anywhere from $ 400 to $ 500.

“If you have Apple go into the digital health marketplace, that’s a huge splash,” Rumsfeld said. “I think this is a major moment in consumer digital health history. We’ll look back and say this was just the beginning.”

Patients already are bringing in readings from their Apple Watch for interpretation by a doctor, said Martinez, associate chief of cardiology for the Lehigh Valley Heart Institute in Allentown, Pa.

“I see a lot of athletes in their middle ages who are bringing in the data and saying what does this beat mean, the alarm sounded, what does this mean,” Martinez said. “How we handle that volume of phone calls is overwhelming sometimes.”

Those queries highlight one of the potential downsides of wearing a portable ECG, Martinez said.

“The flip side of this is I think there’s going to be some anxiety that comes with this,” Martinez said. “The constant feedback you will get can provide some anxiety to folks.”

On the other hand, such devices could provide valuable information to doctors, Rumsfeld said.

For example, the watch could be used to track how often a person is being affected by a-fib.

Continued

“That could be very helpful for us, because we don’t otherwise have a sense how often they’re going in and out of rhythm,” Rumsfeld said. “This could be a tool for the management of patients with atrial fibrillation.”

Martinez will soon be able to tell you himself what it’s like to get these readings — Santa brought him an Apple Watch of his own for Christmas.

“I’m going to try it out and get a sense for what the alarms and feedback are,” Martinez said. “I think it also will make me a better deliverer of the message — no better expert than someone who’s doing it, right?”

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Matthew Martinez, M.D., chair, American College of Cardiology’s Sports and Exercise Cardiology Council; John Rumsfeld, M.D., Ph.D., chief innovation officer, American College of Cardiology

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

Pagination

WebMD Health

What Are This Year’s Most Dangerous Toys?