Menu

AHA News: Stroke Death Rate Increasing for Middle-Aged Americans

THURSDAY, Nov. 7, 2019 (American Heart Association News) — In more than half of all counties across the country, a growing percentage of middle-aged Americans are dying of strokes, according to a new study.

The study – which examined stroke mortality rates at the county level – reveals a statistical jump previously masked by national data showing a leveling off of stroke mortality rates following years of decline. The study was published Nov. 8 in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

“Everyone needs to pay attention to this,” said Eric Hall, lead author on the study and a Ph.D. student in the department of epidemiology at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta.

“At the national level, we know that stroke mortality had been steadily declining for a few decades and started to stagnate around 2010. We took a look at those mortality rates at the county level and saw they were increasing in many counties. That this was happening among middle-aged groups was particularly surprising.”

Nationally, stroke mortality rates – the number of stroke deaths per year divided by the number of people in a population – fell slightly, by 0.7%, each year from 2010 to 2016 for people ages 35-64. It fell 3.5% for those 65 and older.

But when researchers looked at the data on the county level, they found stroke death rates went up in 56.6% of counties during that time period for adults 35-64, with 1 in 4 counties actually experiencing a 10% or more increase. That was even as stroke mortality rates fell for adults 65 and older.

Overall, twice as many counties saw an increase in stroke deaths during that period for middle-aged people compared to older adults. Nearly half of middle-aged adults, or 60.2 million Americans, lived in counties for which stroke mortality rates went up.

The county-level increases don’t mean national data are wrong, said Hall.

“National or state-level data show an average,” he explained. “These data are important because they give high-level perspective on trends in disease. But they don’t reflect changes or disparities occurring at the local level.”

Another surprising finding, said Hall, was that increases in mortality rates occurred in counties across the country, including outside the traditional “stroke belt” of the Southeast, so named because of the prevalence of stroke and risk factors in the region.

Although the highest stroke mortality rates remain in the Southeast, most of the greatest increases for middle-aged adults were seen outside that area, the study shows.

The fact that stroke mortality is increasing in many counties outside the stroke belt suggests risk factors that have been typical to that region have broadened nationally, said Dr. Mitchell Elkind, head of the Division of Neurology Clinical Outcomes Research and Population Science at Columbia University in New York.

For example, the nationwide rise in obesity and type 2 diabetes over the past few decades could be having an impact now on the number of people dying from strokes across the country, he said.

“These conditions don’t lead to stroke immediately,” said Elkind, who was not involved in the new research. “What we are seeing now in terms of stroke may reflect what was going on 10 or 12 years ago.”

He and Hall hope the information can give community organizations and health professionals the data they need to help tailor prevention programs.

“This will help them tailor resources and policies to their individual community health needs,” Hall said.

High consumption of carbohydrates, processed foods and sugar-sweetened beverages combined with high levels of inactivity and “people addicted to their screens” contribute over time to greater obesity levels and the development of Type 2 diabetes, Elkind said.

“We need not just individual behavior changes but changes at the societal level,” he said, “such as better urban design and more physical activity for kids in school, so they grow up with a different attitude towards physical activity.”

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: November 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

One Death, 8 Hospitalized in Salmonella Outbreak Tied to Ground Beef

SATURDAY, Nov. 2, 2019 — Ground beef tainted with salmonella has led to 10 known infections across six states, including eight people so ill they had to be hospitalized, and one death.

“Illnesses in this outbreak are more severe than expected for salmonella,” the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a statement issued Friday.

So far, infections have been reported in Colorado (3 cases), California (2 cases), Kansas (2 cases), Iowa, Oklahoma and Texas, the agency noted.

“Interviews with ill people and laboratory evidence indicate that ground beef is a likely source of this outbreak,” the CDC added, but “a single, common supplier has not been identified.”

For now, the CDC isn’t advising that people stop eating ground beef, but beef should be cooked thoroughly to an internal temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit.

People should always also wash their hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds after touching any raw meat, the CDC said. All ground beef should be refrigerated or frozen within 2 hours of purchase.

Salmonella is a serious gastrointestinal illness that typically leads to diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps between 12 to 72 hours after exposure to the bacteria, the CDC said. Children under 5, seniors and people with weakened immune systems are most at risk.

“This investigation is ongoing, and CDC will provide updates when more information becomes available,” the agency said.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on salmonella.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: November 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

A 70-year-old biking grandmother conquers Bolivia’s ‘Death Road’

Mirtha Munoz a 70-year-old runner participates in the Sky Race, Bolivia’s toughest cycling competition – Bolivia Skyrace – Yolosa, La Paz, Bolivia – October 5, 2019 Mirtha Munoz in action during the Sky Race. The route known as “The way of death” to reach 4000 meters in the Andean mountains REUTERS/David Mercado

LA PAZ (Reuters) – Bolivia´s “Death Road” might seem an odd place for a septuagenarian grandmother on two wheels.

The world´s most dangerous road spirals skyward nearly 11,000 feet, from the country´s lowland jungles to the snow-capped peaks of the Andes. Fog, rain, rockslides and sheer cliffs are main attractions. The road has likely claimed thousands of lives.

But for 70-year old Bolivian Mirtha Munoz, the oldest ever competitor in Bolivia´s 60 km (37 mile) Skyrace, an extreme bike racing competition, it was a natural extension of a passion she picked up years ago.

Munoz took up biking on the advice of her family and a psychologist friend after her son died unexpectedly.

“He told me … the bike could help me get through my pain, and to rebuild,” she said.

Saturday´s race was a pinnacle achievement, no pun intended.

“It´s a vertical climb, you go up and up and there´s no rest,” she told Reuters upon finishing the race.

Munoz, one of the race´s founders, says she enjoys more low-key bike-riding with her six grandchildren, though admits she hopes the eldest, now approaching 18, will soon follow in her tracks.

Reporting by Daniel Ramos and Reuters TV, writing by Dave Sherwood, editing by Chris Reese

Reuters: Oddly Enough

Death Toll Rises as Vaping Cases Skyrocket

Sept. 6, 2019 — Five people have died from vaping-related lung disease as the number of total cases in the U.S. tops 450.

The latest victims are one from Indiana, a 65-year-old Minnesota resident who had lung disease and vaped THC products, and an older Los Angeles County resident who also vaped THC.

The other two were residents of Oregon and Illinois. The reports of illness have come from 33 states and one territory.

At a news briefing Friday, public health officials urged people to stop using e-cigarettes.

“The CDC has advised individuals not to use e-cigarettes because as of now, this is the primary means of preventing [the illness],” said Dana Meaney-Delman, MD, the incident manager for the CDC 2019 Lung Injury Response.

So far, the cases all involved the use of electronic or e-cigarettes to vape nicotine, THC, CBD, or a combination, Meaney-Delman said. Most cases reported are in teens or young adults, although the reports also include middle-age and older adults.

While some public health officials say buying bootleg cartridges with unregulated ingredients may be driving the problem, others are focusing on additives such as vitamin E acetate. But “at this time, no one device, substance, or product has been linked with all the cases,” Meaney-Delman said. More information is needed on many aspects of the investigation, she said, including whether a true relationship actually exists.

The CDC has said that vape cartridges with THC have been involved in many of the cases.

Tracking the Disease

The increase in cases appeared to start in May and June, said Jennifer Layden, MD, PhD, chief medical officer and state epidemiologist for the Illinois Department of Health, who also spoke at the briefing. “It does suggest a new phenomenon,” she said.

Layden, along with doctors from North Carolina and Wisconsin, reported on some of their cases, both at the briefing and in published medical studies.

Typical symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, and chest pain. Some doctors say they also observed diarrhea, fatigue, and weight loss, among other complaints.

Public health officials hope the details from individual cases and various states, as well as product sampling by the FDA, will offer patterns to help them better understand the condition and its link with the devices.

Doctors from North Carolina reported on five patients who vaped and were treated with the acute lung injury, finding a potential link between marijuana oils or concentrates in e-cigarettes and a rare form of pneumonia. “We found a certain type of pneumonia that was not infectious,” said Daniel Fox, MD, a pulmonologist at WakeMed Health, Raleigh. Known as lipoid pneumonia, it happens when lipid or fatty substances enter the lungs.

His team used imaging that can stain for oils, he said in a post-briefing interview. “All five had this in their lungs,” he said.

All the  North Carolina patients also had some other initial diagnosis, such as bronchitis, before returning to medical care when they did not get better, Fox said. Among his 5 patients, some were heavy users, but not all.

The link between vaping THC products and the severe lung disease was also found in most of the 53 cases reported by Illinois and Wisconsin health officials. Of the 53, 84% reported using THC in e-cigarette devices in the 90 days before they began having symptoms.

“The majority of people who have become ill are generally healthy and young with a median age of 19 years, and are generally men,” Layden said.

FDA Testing Continues

More than 120 samples of products have been submitted to the FDA for testing, said Mitch Zeller, JD, director of the FDA Center for Tobacco Products. “The FDA lab is analyzing these samples for a broad range of chemicals,” he said. Those include nicotine, additives, pesticides, opioids, toxins, and other substances.

So far, there is a mix of results, he said. “No one substance or compound, including vitamin E acetate, has been identified in all of the samples tested.”

He urged anyone with information about product safety to file a report through the federal Safety Reporting Portal.

While awareness about the lung condition is growing among the public and doctors, “it’s not something we are trained to look for,” Fox said. “I think it is probably under-recognized.”

So parents of teens, especially those reluctant to seek medical help or admit to vaping cannabis, may need to be aggressive in seeking medical help when they notice symptoms, he said.

Sources

CDC: “Update on Pulmonary Disease Associated with E-cigarettes,” Sept. 6, 2019.

Daniel Fox, MD, pulmonologist, WakeMed Health & Hospitals, Raleigh, NC.

Jennifer Layden, MD, PhD, chief medical officer and state epidemiologist, Illinois Department of Public Health.

Mitch Zeller, JD, director, FDA Center for Tobacco Products.

Dana Meaney-Delman, MD, incident manager, CDC 2019 Lung Injury Response.

CDC, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report: “Outbreak of Electronic-Cigarette-Associated Acute Lipoid Pneumonia — North Carolina, July-August 2019.”

New England Journal of Medicine: Sept. 6, 2019.

Minnesota Department of Health.

Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.

© 2019 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });
WebMD Health

Once Again Soda Tied to Higher Risk of Early Death

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Whether you call it soda, pop or a soft drink, a new study’s findings suggest it would be better for your health to drink water instead.

The large European study found that people who have more than two sodas a day — with or without sugar — had a higher risk of dying over about 16 years than people who sipped the fizzy beverages less than once a month.

“We found that higher soft drink intake was associated with a greater risk of death from any cause regardless of whether sugar-sweetened or artificially sweetened drinks were consumed,” said study senior author Neil Murphy. He’s a scientist with the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France.

“Our results for sugar-sweetened soft drinks provide further support to limit consumption and to replace them with healthier beverages, preferably water,” Murphy said.

How might sodas raise your risk of dying?

Sugar-sweetened beverages may lead to weight gain and obesity. They also may affect the way the hormone insulin is used in the body, which can lead to inflammation, Murphy noted. All of these things can lead to health conditions that may shorten life.

He said more research is needed to understand how artificially sweetened soda might increase the risk of early death.

While it found an association, the current study does not prove a cause-and-effect relationship between soda and a higher risk of early death. It’s possible that soda drinkers have other habits that could add to their odds, such as smoking or a less healthy diet.

This study isn’t the first to find a connection between soda and bad health outcomes. Two recent studies — one from BMJ and the other in Circulation — linked drinking soda to cancer and deaths from heart disease.

The current research included more than 451,000 people from 10 European countries. Their average age was 51. Researchers followed the participants’ health for an average of 16 years.

In addition to a higher risk of dying from all causes for those who drank more than two sodas a day, more sodas were also linked to some specific causes of death.

  • People who had more than one soda daily — sugar-sweetened or artificially sweetened — compared to fewer than one a month had a higher risk of dying from colon cancer and Parkinson’s disease.
  • People who had more than one sugar-sweetened soda a day compared to fewer than one a month had a higher risk of dying from digestive diseases.
  • People who had more than artificially sweetened soda a day compared to less than one a month had a higher risk of dying from circulatory diseases like heart disease.

Continued

Murphy said researchers tried to account for factors such as body mass index (an estimate of body fat based on height and weight) and smoking, and still found an association between drinking more soda and a higher risk of dying.

Representatives of the beverage and sweetener industries urged people not to overreact to the findings.

Low-calorie and no-calorie sweeteners are “an important tool for weight management and those managing diabetes,” said Robert Rankin, president of the Calorie Control Council.

The council’s medical adviser, Dr. Keri Peterson, added: “The safety of low- and no-calorie sweeteners has been reaffirmed time and time again by leading regulatory and governmental agencies around the world.”

William Dermody Jr., a spokesman for the American Beverage Association, offered a similar view. “Soft drinks are safe to consume as part of a balanced diet and the authors of this study acknowledge their research does not indicate otherwise.”

But Dr. Maria Anton, an endocrinologist at Northwell Health’s Long Island Jewish Forest Hills Hospital, said excess consumption of soft drinks and other high-sugar and artificially sweetened beverages has become the norm for many people.

“These can contribute to weight gain and poor blood sugar control, worsening existing conditions like diabetes,” she pointed out.

Anton added that the findings suggest sugar is probably not the only unhealthy ingredient in soft drinks. “Patients in this study who regularly consumed sugar-free, artificially sweetened drinks were also at an increased risk of death,” she pointed out.

Registered dietitian Samantha Heller, from NYU Langone Health in New York City, said many factors may contribute to the link between soda consumption and risk of death. The bottom line, she said, is that people don’t need to drink soda.

“The consumption of beverages that taste sweet is fueled by marketing and advertising. There really is no need to consume them,” Heller said, suggesting suggested water, seltzer or tea instead.

The study was published Sept. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Neil Murphy, Ph.D., scientist, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France; William Dermody Jr., vice president, media and public affairs, American Beverage Association; Samantha Heller, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.N., senior clinical nutritionist, NYU Langone Health, New York City; Maria Anton, M.D., endocrinologist, Northwell Health’s Long Island Jewish Forest Hills Hospital, New York City; Robert Rankin, president, Calorie Control Council; Keri Peterson, M.D., medical adviser, Calorie Control Council;JAMA Internal Medicine, Sept. 3, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

Pagination

WebMD Health

Long-Term ‘Couch Potatoes’ May Face Double the Odds for Early Death

SATURDAY, Aug. 31, 2019 — Decades spent on couches, chairs and otherwise not exercising could mean much shorter lives, new research shows.

A Norwegian team who tracked health outcomes for more than 23,000 adults over 20 years found that those who were inactive over that time had twice the risk of a premature death, compared to those who were physically active.

The take-home message from the study: “To get the maximum health benefits of physical activity in terms of protection against premature all-cause and cardiovascular death, you need to continue being physically active,” said study author Dr. Trine Moholdt of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

And it’s never too late to get off the sofa. “You can also reduce your risk by taking up physical activity later in life, even if you have not been active before,” Moholdt stressed.

Her team was scheduled to present the findings Saturday at the annual meeting of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), in Paris.

The study involved Norwegians aged 20 and older who were grouped according to their activity levels, and assessed in two time periods (1984-1986 and 2006-2008).

People were placed into one of three categories: inactive; moderately active (less than two hours of physical activity a week); or highly active (two or more hours per week).

By the end of 2013, those who were inactive in both time periods were twice as likely to have died from any cause, and 2.7 times more likely to have died from heart disease, specifically, compared with those who were consistently highly active, Moholdt’s group reported.

Even a little exercise helped cut the risk. The study found that people who were “moderately” active at both time points had a 60% and 90% increased risk of death from any cause and death from heart disease, respectively, compared to the consistently highly active group.

Currently, the U.S. government’s Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans advises that adults get 150 minutes a week of moderate intensity exercise or 75 minutes a week of vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity.

But, speaking in an ESC news release, Moholdt added that “physical activity levels even below the advised levels will give health benefits. Physical fitness is more important than the amount of exercise.”

Having trouble getting motivated? “Do activities you like and get more movement into your everyday life,” she advised. “For example, walk to the shops instead of driving, get off the metro a stop early, and use stairs instead of the [elevator]. I recommend everyone to get out of breath at least a couple of times each week.”

The findings were presented at a medical meeting and, as such, should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute offers a guide to physical activity.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: August 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

First Death Reported as Cases Linked to Vaping Rise

CDC telebriefing, Aug. 23, 2019.

Louella Amos, MD, pediatric pulmonologist, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

Alessandra Caporale, PhD, post-doctoral researcher, Laboratory for Structural, Physiologic, and Functional Imaging, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

Emily Chapman, MD, chief medical officer, Children’s Minnesota, Minneapolis.

Sven E. Jordt, PhD, associate professor of anesthesiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC.

Albert Rizzo, MD, chief medical officer, American Lung Association, Chicago.

Karen Wilson, MD, chief, Division of General Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Mount Sinai Kravis Children’s Hospital, New York City; chair, American Academy of Pediatrics’ Tobacco Consortium.

Caporale, A. Radiology, Aug. 20, 2019.

CDC: “CDC, FDA, States Continue to Investigate Severe Pulmonary Disease Among People Who Use E-cigarettes.”

CDC: “Notes from the Field: Use of Electronic Cigarettes and Any Tobacco Product Among Middle and High School Students — United States, 2011-2018.”

Erythropel, H. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, July 26, 2019.

WebMD Health

First Death Tied to Lung Injury From Vaping Reported in Illinois

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 — An Illinois resident who was hospitalized after suffering severe respiratory illness related to vaping has died, state health officials reported Friday.

In addition, the number of reported cases of people who have used e-cigarettes or vaped and have been hospitalized with respiratory symptoms has doubled in Illinois this past week, state health officials said in a release. Details were not available on the person who died.

“Yesterday we received a report of a death of an adult who had been hospitalized with severe unexplained respiratory illness after reported vaping or e-cigarette use,” Dr. Jennifer Layden, chief medical officer for the Illinois Department of Public Health, said during a media briefing Friday afternoon with federal health officials.

“Illinois is working with the CDC, FDA, our local health departments and other state health departments to investigate products and devices that individuals have reportedly used,” Layden said.

A total of 22 people in Illinois, ranging in age from 17 to 38, have experienced respiratory illness after using e-cigarettes or vaping. The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) is working with local health departments to investigate another 12 suspected cases, the agency said.

“The severity of illness people are experiencing is alarming and we must get the word out that using e-cigarettes and vaping can be dangerous,” Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the IDPH said in a statement Friday. “We requested a team from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help us investigate these cases and they arrived in Illinois on Tuesday.”

On Friday, CDC officials updated its tally of such cases to 193, spread across 22 states. These cases have emerged in a relatively short timeframe — from June 28 through Aug. 20, agency officials said during a media briefing.

No age group is immune: E-cigarette users ranging from teenagers to middle-aged adults are falling ill with respiratory symptoms that include coughing, shortness of breath and fatigue.

Some patients have had so much trouble breathing that they wound up on a ventilator in their hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU), said Dr. Albert Rizzo, chief medical officer for the American Lung Association.

“We do have to be careful [to say] that this has not been linked to any specific device, or any specific chemical that might exist in a device,” Rizzo said. “The commonality is it’s mainly young people who’ve supposedly been vaping who ended up having respiratory symptoms.”

The respiratory symptoms appear to be caused by inflammation that causes the lungs to fill with fluid, said Dr. Karen Wilson, vice chair of clinical and translational research for the Jack and Lucy Clark Department of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City.

Testing shows that the inflammation is not caused by an infection, leading doctors to seek another explanation for lung irritation, Wilson and Rizzo said.

Wilson first became aware of these cases a month ago, when the teenage son of a family friend wound up in the ICU with lung injuries possibly linked to vaping.

The 17-year-old is improving, and his prognosis is good, Wilson said.

“In general, I think kids are recovering from this, but it’s hard to say if there’s going to be any long-term risk of lung injury or asthma or other illness,” Wilson said.

E-cigarette vapor contains many ingredients that could cause lung irritation, such as ultrafine particles, oil, and heavy metals like nickel, tin and lead, Rizzo said.

Flavored vapor also can contain diacetyl, a chemical linked to a condition called “popcorn lung,” Rizzo noted. The condition is so named because more than a decade ago workers in a microwave popcorn factory developed lung ailments after breathing in butter-flavored diacetyl.

In popcorn lung, the tiny air sacs in the lungs become scarred, resulting in the thickening and narrowing of the airways, the American Lung Association explained.

There’s also the possibility that heavy levels of nicotine are affecting the lungs, Rizzo added.

“One of the more common e-cigarettes contains as much nicotine in a pod as in a whole pack of cigarettes,” Rizzo said. “It’s very hard to smoke a pack of cigarettes in 15 minutes. You can ingest a whole pod by vaping in 15 minutes.”

The CDC has also noted that recent marijuana use could be a factor.

“In many cases, patients have acknowledged recent use of tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]-containing products while speaking to health care personnel or in follow-up interviews by health department staff,” the agency said. THC is the chemical in pot that gives users a high.

Wilson believes that parents should make sure their teenagers aren’t vaping, and also refrain from vaping in the presence of kids, to prevent secondhand exposure.

“Particularly for adolescents and young adults, they should not have access to these products and they should not use them,” Wilson said. “This is more evidence they’re not a safe product for teenagers and young adults.”

More information

The American Lung Association has more about e-cigarettes and popcorn lung.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: August 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

First Death Tied to Lung Injury From Vaping Reported in Illinois

By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) — An Illinois resident who was hospitalized after suffering severe respiratory illness related to vaping has died, state health officials reported Friday.

In addition, the number of reported cases of people who have used e-cigarettes or vaped and have been hospitalized with respiratory symptoms has doubled in Illinois this past week, state health officials said in a release. Details were not available on the person who died.

“Yesterday we received a report of a death of an adult who had been hospitalized with severe unexplained respiratory illness after reported vaping or e-cigarette use,” Dr. Jennifer Layden, chief medical officer for the Illinois Department of Public Health, said during a media briefing Friday afternoon with federal health officials.

“Illinois is working with the CDC, FDA, our local health departments and other state health departments to investigate products and devices that individuals have reportedly used,” Layden said.

A total of 22 people in Illinois, ranging in age from 17 to 38, have experienced respiratory illness after using e-cigarettes or vaping. The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) is working with local health departments to investigate another 12 suspected cases, the agency said.

“The severity of illness people are experiencing is alarming and we must get the word out that using e-cigarettes and vaping can be dangerous,” Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the IDPH said in a statement Friday. “We requested a team from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help us investigate these cases and they arrived in Illinois on Tuesday.”

On Friday, CDC officials updated its tally of such cases to 193, spread across 22 states. These cases have emerged in a relatively short timeframe — from June 28 through Aug. 20, agency officials said during a media briefing.

No age group is immune: E-cigarette users ranging from teenagers to middle-aged adults are falling ill with respiratory symptoms that include coughing, shortness of breath and fatigue.

Some patients have had so much trouble breathing that they wound up on a ventilator in their hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU), said Dr. Albert Rizzo, chief medical officer for the American Lung Association.

Continued

“We do have to be careful [to say] that this has not been linked to any specific device, or any specific chemical that might exist in a device,” Rizzo said. “The commonality is it’s mainly young people who’ve supposedly been vaping who ended up having respiratory symptoms.”

The respiratory symptoms appear to be caused by inflammation that causes the lungs to fill with fluid, said Dr. Karen Wilson, vice chair of clinical and translational research for the Jack and Lucy Clark Department of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City.

Testing shows that the inflammation is not caused by an infection, leading doctors to seek another explanation for lung irritation, Wilson and Rizzo said.

Wilson first became aware of these cases a month ago, when the teenage son of a family friend wound up in the ICU with lung injuries possibly linked to vaping.

The 17-year-old is improving, and his prognosis is good, Wilson said.

“In general, I think kids are recovering from this, but it’s hard to say if there’s going to be any long-term risk of lung injury or asthma or other illness,” Wilson said.

E-cigarette vapor contains many ingredients that could cause lung irritation, such as ultrafine particles, oil, and heavy metals like nickel, tin and lead, Rizzo said.

Flavored vapor also can contain diacetyl, a chemical linked to a condition called “popcorn lung,” Rizzo noted. The condition is so named because more than a decade ago workers in a microwave popcorn factory developed lung ailments after breathing in butter-flavored diacetyl.

In popcorn lung, the tiny air sacs in the lungs become scarred, resulting in the thickening and narrowing of the airways, the American Lung Association explained.

There’s also the possibility that heavy levels of nicotine are affecting the lungs, Rizzo added.

“One of the more common e-cigarettes contains as much nicotine in a pod as in a whole pack of cigarettes,” Rizzo said. “It’s very hard to smoke a pack of cigarettes in 15 minutes. You can ingest a whole pod by vaping in 15 minutes.”

Continued

The CDC has also noted that recent marijuana use could be a factor.

“In many cases, patients have acknowledged recent use of tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]-containing products while speaking to health care personnel or in follow-up interviews by health department staff,” the agency said. THC is the chemical in pot that gives users a high.

Wilson believes that parents should make sure their teenagers aren’t vaping, and also refrain from vaping in the presence of kids, to prevent secondhand exposure.

“Particularly for adolescents and young adults, they should not have access to these products and they should not use them,” Wilson said. “This is more evidence they’re not a safe product for teenagers and young adults.”

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Aug. 23, 2019, media briefing, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;  Aug. 23, 2019, statement, Illinois Department of Public Health; Albert Rizzo, M.D., chief medical officer,  American Lung Association; Karen Wilson, M.D., MPH, vice chair, clinical and translational research, Jack and Lucy Clark Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City;CBS News, CNN

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

Pagination

WebMD Health

Juried Emmy Winners: ‘Love, Death & Robots,’ ‘Age of Sail’ & ‘Carmen Sandiego’ Animators Honored

The Television Academy announced today the juried award winners for the 71st Emmy Awards in categories from Animation, Choreography, Interactive Programming and Motion Design. The juried awards for these categories will be presented at the 2019 Creative Arts Awards ceremonies on Saturday, Sept. 14, and Sunday, Sept. 15.

In Outstanding Individual Achievement In Animation, there were seven first-time winners and one second-time winner from programs across two platforms, YouTube and Netflix. Adult animation anthology Love, Death & Robots earned four awards, followed by VR short Age of Sail with three and kids’ adventure Carmen Sandiego with one.

A full list of winners is available online. A two-part presentation ceremony for the Creative Arts Emmy Awards will be held September 14 and 15 at Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles, broadcast Sept. 21 at 8 p.m. on FXX.

Outstanding Individual Achievement in Animation
Age of Sail • YouTube • Google Spotlight Stories and Boathouse Studios • Céline Desrumaux, Production Designer
Age of Sail • YouTube • Google Spotlight Stories and Boathouse Studios • Bruno Mangyoku, Character Designer
Age of Sail • YouTube • Google Spotlight Stories and Boathouse Studios • Jasmin Lai, Color
Carmen Sandiego “The Chasing Paper Caper” • Netflix • Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing and DHX Media • Elaine Lee, Background Painter
Love, Death & Robots “The Witness” • Netflix • Blur Studio • Alberto Mielgo, Production Designer
Love, Death & Robots ”Good Hunting” • Netflix • Blur Studio • Jun-ho Kim, Background Designer
Love, Death & Robots “The Witness” • Netflix • Blur Studio • David Pate, Character Animator
Love, Death & Robots “Sucker of Souls” • Netflix • Blur Studio • Owen Sullivan, Storyboard Artist

Outstanding Innovation in Interactive Media
Artificial • Twitch • 96 Next • Bernie Su, Executive Producer; Evan Mandery, Executive Producer; Michael Y. Chow, Executive Producer; Bonnie Buckner, Executive Producer; Ken Kalopsis, Executive Producer

Wolves in the Walls: It’s All Over • Oculus Store • Fable Studio, Facebook, Story Studio, Third Rail Projects • Pete Billington, Director and Creator; Jessica Yaffa Shamash, Creative Producer and Creator; Edward Saatchi, Executive Producer

Outstanding Motion Design
Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj • Netflix • A Netflix Original Production • Michelle Higa Fox, Creative Director; Jorge L. Peschiera, Creative Director; Yussef Cole, Head of Animation; Brandon Sugiyama, Lead Animator; Paris London Glickman, Lead Animator

Wolves in the Walls: It's All Over

Wolves in the Walls: It’s All Over

Carmen Sandiego "The Chasing Paper Caper"

Carmen Sandiego “The Chasing Paper Caper”

Age of Sail

Age of Sail

Animation Magazine

KyoAni Fire: Death Toll Rises, Server Data Survives, CEO Vows “We Will Not Vanish”

The death toll of the Kyoto Animation fire continued to rise Saturday when another man succumbed to his injuries in hospital, the 35th life claimed by the blaze caused by suspected arsonist Shinji Aoba. The names of the victims have still not been revealed, though police announced last week that identification of the deceased had been completed. Investigators began searching Aoba’s home in Saitama on Friday, confiscating evidence that appears to link the suspect to KyoAni. He has been unconscious in hospital since the attack.

As the studio looks forward to recovering from this tragedy, Japanese media reports that data has been recovered from the server housed on the first floor of the building. The server was surrounded by concrete walls, preventing direct fire or water damage. An unnamed specialist recovered the data, which includes digitized key animation drawings — computer workstations and paper drawings were all destroyed by the fire. The studio’s much anticipated feature film Violet Evergarden: Eternity and the Auto Memories Doll is due for release in Japan this fall.

On Tuesday, a source told media that donations to the studio in support of fire victims, survivors and their families have surpassed 1 billion yen ($ 9.2 million USD). Contributions have poured in from individuals and companies around the world, including a crowdfunding campaign by U.S.-based Sentai Filmworks which has raised over $ 2.3 million.

An official statement from Kyoto Animation CEO Hideaki Hatta was posted to the studio’s website in Japanese, Chinese, Korean and German. The English version reads:

“An unprecedented atrocity has robbed many of our friends and colleagues of their bright futures and has left many deeply injured. News from all over the world tells us that amazingly many number of people has sent us their hearts and prayers, which are like candles in the darkness, for those of us trapped in the darkness of deepest grief.

There are many friends and colleagues who are hospitalized and suffering, fighting for their lives. Please give us some time.

We promise that Kyoto Animation will continue to create animation that help people have dreams, hope and impress them. Kyoto animation will continue to make its employees and staff lead happy lives, and contribute to society and local community. I assure you that Kyoto Animation will not give up, we will not go quietly into the night…we will not vanish without a fight!”

Animation Magazine

FDA: Infections, 1 Death After Fecal Transplants

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Fecal transplants — transferring fecal matter from a healthy person into an ill person with a compromised “microbiome” — is an increasingly used new treatment for a variety of ills.

But on Thursday federal health officials announced that a patient died after such a procedure, highlighting the potential for severe infections linked to fecal transplants.

“While we support this area of scientific discovery, it’s important to note that fecal microbiota for transplantation does not come without risk,” said Dr. Peter Marks, director the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

After reports of serious, antibiotic-resistant infections linked to the procedures, the FDA wants “to alert all health care professionals who administer FMT [fecal microbiota transplant] about this potential serious risk so they can inform their patients,” Marks said in an agency news release.

Fecal microbiota transplant is a still-experimental procedure, as yet unapproved by the FDA. It’s been primarily used to treat serious infections of antibiotic-resistant forms of the Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) bacterium.

The transplant involves taking stool from a healthy donor and placing it in the ill patient’s colon. The aim is to help replace an unhealthy “microbiome” — the trillions of bacteria that reside in the human gut — with a more robust, disease-fighting microbiome from the donor.

Once delivered via the fecal transplant, this new microbiome repopulates the patient’s microbiome with healthier microorganisms, which effectively crowd out dangerous C. difficile.

Researchers are also looking into the use of fecal transplants to treat chronic gastrointestinal illnesses such as ulcerative colitis or irritable bowel syndrome.

But every therapy comes with risks, and the FDA said that two patients who received fecal microbiota transplants as part of a clinical trial developed life-threatening infections from multidrug-resistant bacteria delivered in the transplants. One of the patients has died.

Both patients had weakened immune systems, making them more vulnerable to germs that are resistant to multiple antibiotics. So, the FDA is now mandating that special screening and testing of the stool used in these procedures be done, to ensure that no drug-resistant bacteria are in the donated material.

Continued

Also, when fecal microbiota transplants are used, doctors need to have adequate informed consent from the patient, the FDA said. Patients need to be warned of any potential risks associated with the treatment and be told that the treatment is still considered experimental.

Marks stressed that the FDA still supports research into fecal transplant therapy.

“The medical community is actively engaged in exploring the potential uses of fecal microbiota for transplantation,” he said. Although the therapy isn’t approved by the FDA, the agency supports the use of this treatment and is looking to “strike a balance between assuring patient safety and facilitating access to unapproved treatments for unmet medical needs,” Marks said.

To that end, “we will continue to aggressively monitor clinical trials to ensure patients are protected when safety concerns arise,” Marks said.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, June 13, 2019, press release

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

Pagination

WebMD Health

Polish activists try to save cows condemned to death

WARSAW (Reuters) – A herd of about 180 free-roaming cows in Poland must be slaughtered, authorities have ruled, to the dismay of activists fighting to save them as a cause celebre for animal rights.

Left to wander fields in the western municipality of Deszczno for years, the cows are a threat to public safety and the health of other animals because they have not had proper checks, Poland’s chief veterinary officer has ruled.

The owners of the cows, who are twin brothers, left them to roam and breed unsupervised, comparing them in one interview to revered holy cows in India.

“I have instructed the veterinary services that they have to clean up these cows,” Minister of Agriculture Jan Krzysztof Ardanowski said earlier this month. The slaughter would cost about 350,000 zlotys ($ 91,000), local media reported.

Animal rights campaigners have been staging protests and kicking up a fuss on social media.

“There will be a terrible roar of great pain … It’s very cruel,” said Anna Dryglas, from the Society for the Care of Animals, imagining the animals’ suffering at being loaded up for the slaughterhouse.

($ 1 = 3.8398 zlotys)

Writing by Alan Charlish; Editing by Andrew Cawthorne

Reuters: Oddly Enough

AHA News: Drummer’s Death Inspires Grief-Stricken Bandmates to Rethink Rock ‘n’ Roll Lifestyle

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (American Heart Association News) — When the members of the hard rock band Hellyeah walked onstage for their first show in more than a year, everything looked different.

The most glaring change was the absence of famed drummer Vinnie Paul Abbott, who died suddenly in June 2018 at age 54 from severe coronary artery disease and a disease of the heart muscle called dilated cardiomyopathy.

A more subtle difference was happening where fans couldn’t see it, inside the musicians’ heads. Once famous for their hard drinking and hellraising, the members of Hellyeah had gained a new perspective on the rock ‘n’ roll lifestyle.

“Vinnie’s passing was a wake-up call for us all,” said Hellyeah guitarist Tom Maxwell. “I really sat back and looked at my mortality and said, ‘You know what? I’ve got to quit smoking and exercise more and stop eating garbage.’ I have a little boy who needs his dad. I have a wife who needs her husband.”

Titled “A Celebration of the Life of Vinnie Paul,” the concert took place at the House of Blues in Las Vegas, Abbott’s adopted hometown, which officially declared May 11 “Vinnie Paul Day.” A portion of the concert’s ticket sales that day benefited the American Heart Association (AHA).

Hellyeah bassist Kyle Sanders said Abbott’s sudden death made him “reassess everything.”

“Everyone can make some kind of change for the better,” he said. “It’s never too late.”

Abbott came to fame in the early ’90s as the lightning-fast drummer of Pantera, the Dallas-based metal quartet that earned four Grammy nominations, sold millions of albums and packed arenas worldwide.

When Pantera broke up in 2003, Abbott and his guitar-playing brother, Dimebag Darrell, promptly formed a new band, Damageplan. But tragedy struck a year later when “Dime” was shot and killed onstage by an audience member during a concert in Columbus, Ohio.

Maxwell said he believes the shooting caused Abbott to develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which studies have shown to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

“He had night terrors about what happened,” Maxwell said. “For a while, he went inside his shell and drank heavily and put on weight. When Hellyeah came along, it really helped him, but he still suffered greatly. He couldn’t get over the loss of his brother.”

Maxwell said Abbott took blood pressure medicine and checked his heart rate, but rarely visited a doctor’s office.

“He was fearful of dying, but he wasn’t diligent about going to the doctor,” Maxwell said. “If he would’ve just gone in and got checked out thoroughly, it could have made all the difference. He could still be with us right now.”

Hellyeah has recruited a new drummer, Roy Mayorga, and will launch a tour later this year, with a portion of the proceeds going to the AHA. But Maxwell said Abbott is irreplaceable — both as a drummer and a friend.

“Vinnie pioneered the sound of hard rock metal drumming,” he said. “He’s up there with John Bonham, Keith Moon and all of the greats.

“He was so generous and positive and giving. He was like Santa Claus. It wasn’t about him. … He wanted everybody around him to have a good time.”

Before his death, Abbott recorded the drum parts for songs that now make up Welcome Home, a new Hellyeah album coming out in September. The band pays tribute to Abbott in “Skyy & Water” with the words, “Choking back my tears again today, I can hear your voice / I can hear you say, ‘Don’t sweat the small stuff and just keep on keeping on.'”

Sadly, those lyrics carry a double meaning.

While Abbott didn’t worry about little things, he also didn’t take one small step — scheduling a checkup that possibly could have kept him alive, Maxwell said.

“I’d love to go back a couple of years and motivate him to get his heart checked out and motivate him to cut back a bit on his eating and drinking,” he said. “We miss him greatly. Our lives are never going to be the same without him.”

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: May 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews