Why This Decades-Old Skincare Line is Now Farming Hemp

“My whole life lately seems to be about hemp,” says Lily Morgan. And for good reason: The founder of Colorado-based skin care company Lily Farm Fresh Skin Care has owned and operated eighty acres of farmland to supply her own production in Keenesburg, Colorado, for over thirty years, Now nearly 90 percent of it is devoted to hemp.

Morgan, who also owns an additional 170-plus acres spread throughout the state, has been making cleansers, moisturizers, toners, lip balms and other products for her certified organic skin care line since 1986. But she’s recently shifted, jumping on the CBD bandwagon and growing hemp for her new CBD-infused line of therapeutic lotions.

A relatively new addition to the skin care industry, CBD lotions, balms and patches are used to alleviate muscle, joint and nerve pain, as well as inflammation; Morgan thinks those products can also treat redness, puffiness and irritation. The Lily Farm team is currently finalizing the formula for a CBD cream that targets joint and muscle pain, and plans to eventually sell an expanded line of CBD-infused skin care — hopefully in Natural Grocers, which already carries Lily Farm non-CBD products.

“Why not?,” she asks. “I mean, we already have the lab, and I’m going to have all the hemp I could want.”

Marijuana Deals Near You

Morgan didn’t dive into the hemp trend immediately. After visiting a hemp symposium and offering her farm as a cultivation site for experienced hemp farmers, Morgan partnered with a hemp grower who had the equipment and expertise to cover that much ground. Without her partner, whom she declines to name, she would not have been able to grow more than a few acres of hemp for personal use, she says. But with her partner’s equipment, originally made to harvest tobacco but retrofitted to tackle hemp, Morgan was able to mass-produce hemp for CBD products that she had already been concocting for personal use.

Despite being a seventh-generation farmer and having a grandfather who also grew hemp, Morgan never thought she’d be participating in the CBD craze. She once tried incorporating store-bought hemp oil in her products, but found that it quickly made them go rancid. In the past, friends had suggested that she start growing marijuana or hemp\, but because both were still federally illegal, she felt it wasn’t worth the trouble.

A snippet of Morgan's extensive Keenesburg property.

A snippet of Morgan’s extensive Keenesburg property.

Cleo Mirza

But after the 2018 Farm Bill legalized hemp farming on the federal level, Morgan rented out one of her other farm properties to hemp growers. Upon mentioning that she had trouble sleeping to her new tenants, they offered her a sample of CBD tincture. Initially, she was hesitant, insisting she didn’t want to take anything that would make her feel high. After the growers explained that CBD isn’t intoxicating but might improve her sleeping, she decided to try it.

“I hadn’t slept that well in, like, 45 years. So I took it, and I put it in some of my creams, just for me. And I started using it for neck stress and shoulder pain, and I saw a big change,” Morgan says. “And then I started reading everything, testing formulations and making them for myself.”

Now Morgan is using her story to convince others to give CBD a chance. She’s even planning a hemp festival this fall on her Keenesburg farm to promote industry networking and hemp education.

Morgan sees the negative stigma around the cannabis plant as the greatest obstacle to normalizing hemp and CBD use. “A lot of people my age don’t want to go to dispensaries. I don’t,” she explains. “So I think a lot of people my age will be really slow to try it. I was pretty darn slow. I was not enthusiastic about [CBD] until I tried it.”

Now she’s changed her tune, and believes others will follow.

“People are saying that it is going to boom and then bust, but I don’t think so. The hemp farming is going to be exponential, but so is the demand — because everybody is talking about it, people that you wouldn’t suspect,” Morgan says. “But it still does have that affiliation with its cousin, and a lot of people just don’t want anything to do with that. But it’s not marijuana; you can’t get high off of it. That’s fundamental to me.” 


Toke of the Town

Canada’s top court finally ends decades-old contamination case

An industrial contamination lawsuit brought a quarter century ago has been dismissed by the Supreme Court of Canada, bringing an end to a case dating as far back as 1924 that involved black tar so sticky that horses caught in its grip had to be shot.

The Supreme Court of Canada this week refused to hear a case filed by Canadian National Railway Co. in 1989, relating to the contamination.

It pointed to lower court decisions that questioned how a fair trial could be held about a tar spill that CN said traced back to between 1924 and 1958.

“By the time the litigation commenced in June 1989, the issues were already 30 to 65 years old,” court documents said.

“While the first 14 years of delay were excusable, the delay between the years 2003 and 2014 was inordinate and inexcusable,” the Ontario Superior Court of Justice said in 2014.

Court documents said that CN never responded to requests in 1997 by the Ontario town of Kitchener to examine five elderly witnesses, some of whom were ill.

Montreal-based CN said that tar produced as a by-product of a coal gasification plant operated by the town migrated on to its property between 1924 and 1958, according to court records.

CN alleged that the city was dumping the coal tar on neighboring lands owned by the defendant, Hogg Fuel & Supply Ltd.

The tar, a black to brown liquid, was once described in trial records as a “gooey substance” so sticky some horses were caught in it and had to be shot.

CN was seeking between C$ 1 million to C$ 2 million from Hogg Fuel and Kitchener to clean up its land, plus other costs, court documents said.

The case was filed in 1989, just after Ontario’s environment ministry told CN it was preparing to order the “owners of polluted sites and the former gas plant operators to clean-up the contaminated lands,” superior court documents show.

CN declined to comment on Friday.

(Reporting By Allison Lampert)


Reuters: Oddly Enough

In Decades-Old Program, Uncle Sam Provides Pot

Sometime after midnight on a moonlit rural Oregon highway, a state trooper checking a car he had just pulled over found less than an ounce of pot on one passenger: A chatty 72-year-old woman blind in one eye. She insisted the weed was legal and was approved by the U.S. government.

The trooper and his supervisor were doubtful. But after a series of calls to the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the Drug Enforcement Agency and her physician, the troopers handed her back the card — and her pot.

For the past three decades, Uncle Sam has been providing a handful of patients with some of the highest grade marijuana around. The program grew out of a 1976 court settlement that created the country’s first legal pot smoker.

Advocates for legalizing marijuana or treating it as a medicine say the program is a glaring contradiction in the nation’s 40-year war on drugs — maintaining the federal ban on pot while at the same time supplying it.

Government officials say there is no contradiction. The program is no longer accepting new patients, and public health authorities have concluded that there was no scientific value to it, Steven Gust of the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse told The Associated Press.

At one point, 14 people were getting government pot. Now, there are four left.

The government has only continued to supply the marijuana “for compassionate reasons,” Gust said.

‘I Have No Pain’

One of the recipients is Elvy Musikka, the chatty Oregon woman. A vocal marijuana advocate, Musikka relies on the pot to keep her glaucoma under control. She entered the program in 1988, and said that her experience with marijuana is proof that it works as a medicine.

They “won’t acknowledge the fact that I do not have even one aspirin in this house,” she said, leaning back on her couch, glass bong cradled in her hand. “I have no pain.”

Marijuana is getting a look from states around the country considering calls to repeal decades-old marijuana prohibition laws. There are 16 states that have medical marijuana programs. In the three West Coast states, advocates are readying tax-and-sell or other legalization programs.

Marijuana was legal for much of U.S. history and was recognized as a medicine in 1850. Opposition to it began to gather and, by 1936, 48 states had passed laws regulating pot, fearing it could lead to addiction.

Anti-marijuana literature and films, like the infamous “Reefer Madness,” helped fan those fears. Eventually, pot was classified among the most harmful of drugs, meaning it had no usefulness and a high potential for addiction.

In 1976, a federal judge ruled that the Food and Drug Administration must provide Robert Randall of Washington, D.C. with marijuana because of his glaucoma — no other drug could effectively combat his condition. Randall became the nation’s first legal pot smoker since the drug’s prohibition.

Others Join Federal Program

Eventually, the government created its program as part of a compromise over Randall’s care in 1978, long before a single state passed a medical marijuana law. What followed were a series of petitions from people like Musikka to join the program.

President George H.W. Bush’s administration, getting tough on crime and drugs, stopped accepting new patients in 1992. Many of the patients who had qualified had AIDS, and they were dying.

The AP asked the agency that administers the program, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, for documents showing how much marijuana has been sent to patients since the first patient in 1976.

The agency supplied full data for 2005-2011, which showed that during that period the federal government distributed more than 100 pounds of high-grade marijuana to patients.

Agency officials said records related to the program before 2005 had been destroyed, but were able to provide scattered records for a couple of years in the early 2000s.

The four patients remaining in the program estimate they have received a total of 584 pounds from the federal government over the years. On the street, that would be worth more than $ 500,000.

All of the marijuana comes from the University of Mississippi, where it is grown, harvested and stored.

Government Pot Production

Dr. Mahmoud ElSohly, who directs the operation, said the marijuana was a small part of the crop the university has been growing since 1968 for all cannabis research in the U.S. Among the studies are the pharmaceutical uses for synthetic mimics of pot’s psychoactive ingredient, THC.

ElSohly said the four patients are getting pot with about 3 percent THC. He said 3 percent is about the range patients have preferred in blind tests.

The marijuana is then sent from Mississippi to a tightly controlled North Carolina lab, where they are rolled into cigarettes. And every month, steel tins with white labels are sent to Florida and Iowa. Packed inside each is a half-pound of marijuana rolled into 300 perfectly-wrapped joints.

With Musikka living in Oregon, she is entitled to more legal pot than anyone in the nation because she’s also enrolled in the state’s medical marijuana program. Neither Iowa nor Florida has approved marijuana as a medicine, so the federal pot is the only legal access to the drug for the other three patients.

The three other people in the program range in ages and doses of marijuana provided to them, but all consider themselves an endangered species that, once extinct, can be brushed aside by a federal government that pretends they don’t exist.

All four have become crusaders for the marijuana-legalization movement. They’re rock stars at pro-marijuana conferences, sought-after speakers and recognizable celebrities in the movement.

Irv Rosenfeld, a financial adviser in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, has been in the program since November 1982. His condition produces painful bone tumors, but he said marijuana has replaced prescription painkillers.

Rosenfeld likes to tell this story: In the mid-1980s, the federal government asked his doctor for an update on how Rosenfeld was doing. It was an update the doctor didn’t believe the government was truly interested in. He had earlier tried to get a copy of the previous update, and was told the government couldn’t find it, Rosenfeld said.

So instead of filling out the form, the doctor responded with a simple sentence written in large, red letters: “It’s working.”

Source: Associated Press (Wire)
Author: Nigel Duara, The Associated Press
Published: September 28, 2011
Copyright: 2011 The Associated Press

Other Posts of Interest:

  1. NM Proposing Changes in Medical Marijuana Program
  2. New Mexico Proposes Fees To Fund Cannabis Program
  3. Marijuana Activist Gets Her Supply From Unusual Source:
  4. Marijuana Activist Gets Supply From Uncle Sam

Cannabis News – Medical Marijuana, Marijuana News, Hemp, Cannabis