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Don’t Delay Very Early-Stage Breast Cancer Surgery

By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Oct. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Delaying surgery for a noninvasive breast cancer can have dire consequences, a new study shows.

Longer delays in surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) breast cancer lead to a higher risk of invasive ductal carcinoma and a slightly lower survival rate, researchers found.

“For each month of delay, there was well under a 1% difference in survival. But for each month of delay, there was an approximate 1% increase in the finding of invasive cancer,” said study author Dr. Richard Bleicher, a professor of surgical oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center, in Philadelphia.

“The survival difference with a delay is small,” Bleicher noted in a center news release. “While it’s not an emergency to get treated immediately, delays do have an effect and long delays should be avoided.”

DCIS occurs when abnormal cells form in the milk duct of the breast and is the earliest stage of breast cancer. When cancerous cells spread beyond the milk duct, it becomes invasive ductal carcinoma.

Standard treatment for DCIS is surgery and radiotherapy, along with endocrine therapy. But research suggests that some DCIS may never progress to invasive disease, and clinical trials are being conducted to determine whether DCIS can be observed, rather than surgically removed.

This study “suggests that delays in operative management of DCIS are associated with invasion and slightly worse short-term outcomes,” Bleicher said. “Since observation represents infinite delay, it suggests that observation should not yet be pursued outside of a clinical trial in patients who will tolerate excision.”

The study included more than 140,600 U.S. women (123,947 with DCIS, 16,668 with invasive ductal carcinoma). They were diagnosed between 2004 and 2014.

Survival was compared with five time intervals in delays to have surgery: less than 30 days, 31-60 days, 61-90 days, 91-120 days, or 121-365 days.

Overall survival was 95.8%, with a median time from diagnosis to surgery of 38 days. However, each increase in diagnosis-to-surgery interval was associated with a 7.4% increase in the risk of death.

The study was published Oct. 21 in the Annals of Surgical Oncology.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: Fox Chase Cancer Center, news release, Oct. 21, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

Don’t Delay Surgery for Very Early-Stage Breast Cancer, Study Suggests

THURSDAY, Oct. 24, 2019 — Delaying surgery for a noninvasive breast cancer can have dire consequences, a new study shows.

Longer delays in surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) breast cancer lead to a higher risk of invasive ductal carcinoma and a slightly lower survival rate, researchers found.

“For each month of delay, there was well under a 1% difference in survival. But for each month of delay, there was an approximate 1% increase in the finding of invasive cancer,” said study author Dr. Richard Bleicher, a professor of surgical oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center, in Philadelphia.

“The survival difference with a delay is small,” Bleicher noted in a center news release. “While it’s not an emergency to get treated immediately, delays do have an effect and long delays should be avoided.”

DCIS occurs when abnormal cells form in the milk duct of the breast and is the earliest stage of breast cancer. When cancerous cells spread beyond the milk duct, it becomes invasive ductal carcinoma.

Standard treatment for DCIS is surgery and radiotherapy, along with endocrine therapy. But research suggests that some DCIS may never progress to invasive disease, and clinical trials are being conducted to determine whether DCIS can be observed, rather than surgically removed.

This study “suggests that delays in operative management of DCIS are associated with invasion and slightly worse short-term outcomes,” Bleicher said. “Since observation represents infinite delay, it suggests that observation should not yet be pursued outside of a clinical trial in patients who will tolerate excision.”

The study included more than 140,600 U.S. women (123,947 with DCIS, 16,668 with invasive ductal carcinoma). They were diagnosed between 2004 and 2014.

Survival was compared with five time intervals in delays to have surgery: less than 30 days, 31-60 days, 61-90 days, 91-120 days, or 121-365 days.

Overall survival was 95.8%, with a median time from diagnosis to surgery of 38 days. However, each increase in diagnosis-to-surgery interval was associated with a 7.4% increase in the risk of death.

The study was published Oct. 21 in the Annals of Surgical Oncology.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more on treatment of DCIS.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: October 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Surgical Procedure Aims to Delay Menopause

Aug. 6, 2019 — Ten British women have undergone a first-of-a-kind surgery that could delay menopause by up to 20 years.

The procedure involves removing a portion of a woman’s ovaries and then cryogenically freezing it. When the woman gets closer to the age of menopause, the tissue is thawed and re-implanted to restore her younger, natural hormones, CBS News reported.

The women, ages 22-36, had the procedure performed by doctors at ProFam in Birmingham, England.

While a remarkable development, it also raises a number of questions, according to CBS News medical contributor Dr. David Agus.

“A hundred years ago, the average life expectancy was in the 50s,” he told CBS This Morning. “So now really we’re living, or women are living, with four or five decades of having menopause. So menopause, osteoporosis, increased heart disease, obviously hot flashes, potentially memory problems, and others, you can delay that with this procedure.”

However, the effects the procedure will have on women won’t be known for several decades.

“For all we know it could change cancer risk,” Agus said. “It could change cognitive function later as you get older. We just don’t know the answer.”

He noted that similar procedures have been available for decades for women with cancer, but not healthy women, CBS News reported.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

News Bytes: ‘Sonic’ Redesign Causes Delay, ‘Shrek’ vs. ‘Thrones,’ Sony Launches PlayStation Productions & More

Mattel & Warner Bros. CP Extend DC Global Toy Partnership
Mattel will continue to be the toy licensee for DC Universe characters and brands in the girls, preschool, vehicles, games and novelty categories, supporting and growing both existing franchises as well as new content from the DC Super Hero Girls brand.

“Mattel has been our partner on DC for over 15 years and really knows our characters and understands the special connection they have with our fans. Their leadership in the preschool, vehicle and girls categories will help us bring great toys and experiences to DC fans of all ages.” — Stephen Teglas, SVP for North America, WBCP

CALL FOR ENTRIES: animago 2019
The 23rd competition for 3D animation, vfx and design will be held Nov. 2-5 in Munich. Submissions are invited to enter for a shot at 10 competition categories, including the new Best In-Game Graphics award, Best Visual Effects, Best Game Cinematic, Best Short Film, Best Advertising Production, Best Character, Best Young Production, Jury’s Prize, Best Motion Design, and Best Still (public vote). Deadline: June 30, 2019.

Sony Interactive Launches Unit to Adapt Games for Film, TV
The new banner headed by Asad Qizilbash and overseen by Sony Interactive chairman of worldwide studios Shawn Layden will mine the PlayStation games property library for filmed entertainment hits. Titles like Tomb Raider and Ratchet & Clank have previously received live-action and animated movie adaptations.

“We looked at what Marvel has done in taking the world of comic books and making it into the biggest thing in the film world. It would be a lofty goal to say we’re following in their footsteps, but certainly we’re taking inspiration from that … We want to create an opportunity for fans of our games to have more touch points with our franchises. When fans beat a 40-50 hour game and have to wait three-four years for a sequel, we want to give them places they can go and still have more of that experience and see the characters they love evolve in different ways.” — Shawn Layden, SIE Chairman – Worldwide Studios.

Let Us Not Overlook ‘Shrek’s Contributions to ‘Game of Thrones’
One seemingly absurdTwitter thread has outshone every long-gestated fan theory about the show, tbh.

’Game of Thrones’ Alum Bryan Cogman Joins ‘Lord of the Rings’ Amazon Series
Speaking of fantasy epics! Cogman joined GoT as an assistant to creators David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, and went on to write many key episodes (including season 8 tearjerker “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms”) and wrap the show as a co-executive producer. The move to LotR is part of his overall deal with Amazon Studios. The new series will further explore Middle-earth outside the familiar book trilogy tale.

Jeff Fowler: ‘Sonic’ Date Pushed Back for Redesign
After the debut trailer for live-action/CG event feature Sonic the Hedgehog gave the entire collective internet a conniption and caused director Fowler to announce a redesign of the lead character, the helmer posted to Twitter Friday that the release is being delayed to accommodate the makeover. “Taking a little more time to make Sonic just right. #novfxartistswereharmedinthemakingofthismovie,” Fowler tweeted, with a sketch of Sonic’s gloved hand (are they turning his furry white hands back into gloves?!) holding a sign with the date February 14, 2020. The new date means Sonic debuts the same day as comic-book movie Kingsman 3 and a week after hybrid family flick Peter Rabbit 2.

Animago

Animago

DC Universe toys

DC Universe toys

Animation Magazine

Drug May Delay MS Disability for Some

By Serena Gordon

HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) — An immune system drug may help prevent or slow complications in a type of multiple sclerosis known as secondary progressive MS, a new study finds.

The medication is called rituximab (Rituxan). It’s used to treat a number of conditions, including certain blood cell cancers and the autoimmune condition rheumatoid arthritis.

The new Swiss study found that MS patients taking the drug reported less disabling symptoms over a 10-year period than those who didn’t. People taking rituximab also had a slower progression of MS symptoms.

It’s important to note that the study was small, with 88 people, of whom only 44 received the medication, said Nicholas LaRocca, vice president of health care delivery and policy research for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

“This is a potentially valuable treatment, but there are still a lot of questions. Other studies are underway looking at the value of rituximab,” LaRocca said.

With multiple sclerosis, the immune system turns against the central nervous system. Inflammation caused by the immune system damages a fatty substance called myelin that surrounds nerve cells, according to the National MS Society.

Symptoms of the disease vary from person to person, but may include fatigue, dizziness, problems walking, numbness or tingling, vision problems, pain, depression, bowel and bladder problems, muscle spasms and trouble with thinking and memory, according to the society.

MS usually begins as a relapsing-remitting disease. Sometimes it’s active, and sometimes it’s not. Most people with this form of MS will eventually transition to secondary progressive MS, which leads to more neurological problems and disability.

LaRocca said rituximab appears to work by affecting B-cells in the immune system. These cells have been implicated in the development of MS in other research, according to background information in the latest report.

In the study, researchers led by Dr. Yvonne Naegelin, from the University of Basel, Switzerland, compared 44 people with MS treated with rituximab to 44 people with MS who weren’t given rituximab.

The volunteers who received rituximab were an average age of 50 and had been diagnosed with MS for about 18 years. The average age of the group that didn’t receive rituximab was 51 and they had MS for an average of 19 years. The group that didn’t receive rituximab was slightly less disabled, according to a disability scale.

Continued

Dr. Asaff Harel is a neurologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. He said, “This is an interesting, but limited, study that suggests that rituximab, a B-cell therapy, may be beneficial in the treatment of secondary progressive MS.”

While those who got the drug tended to have lower progression of disabling symptoms, Harel said that “baseline differences in the two populations, such as age and the presence of relapses or new lesions, could cloud the results.”

LaRocca said there was also a difference in the types of treatments the two groups had been exposed to prior to this study, which could have affected the results.

Rituximab isn’t approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating MS. Because of this, LaRocca said it wasn’t clear if all insurance companies would cover its cost.

But, he said that it’s reasonable for people to ask their physicians what they think of the drug and whether or not it might be an option for them.

Both experts said that more study is definitely needed to see if the drug is truly effective, along with answering other important questions, such as what’s the optimal dose and how long can someone go between drug infusions?

The report was published online Jan. 7 in JAMA Neurology.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Nicholas LaRocca, Ph.D., vice president, health care delivery and policy research, National Multiple Sclerosis Society; Asaff Harel, M.D., neurologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Jan. 7, 2019,JAMA Neurology, online

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Pagination

WebMD Health

Many With Polyps Delay Follow-Up Colonoscopy

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Many people found to have colon polyps (adenomas) that can lead to cancer don’t have follow-up colonoscopies at recommended times, a new study finds.

Patients who have certain types of adenomas, or large or numerous ones, are at increased risk for colorectal cancer, the study authors reported in the Nov. 20 issue of the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

“When a patient is found to have some of these higher-risk findings, guidelines recommend that they come back for another colonoscopy in three years. This is called surveillance colonoscopy, and it improves our chances of preventing colorectal cancer or detecting it at an early stage,” study author Jessica Chubak said in a journal news release.

Chubak is a senior scientific investigator at Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute.

Her team analyzed data from more than 6,900 U.S. patients, aged 50 to 89, with high-risk adenomas. The patients had their initial colonoscopies done at one of three Kaiser Permanente systems, or at the Parkland Health & Hospital System, which treats patients regardless of their insurance status or ability to pay.

Between 47 percent and 59.5 percent of the Kaiser Permanente patients had a follow-up colonoscopy within 3 1/2 years, compared with 18.3 percent of Parkland patients.

The significantly lower rate at Parkland was most likely due to differences in patient populations and resources, according to Chubak.

The study found that patients with more adenomas or with higher-risk adenomas were more likely to get the follow-up colonoscopy at the recommended time.

Age was another factor. Patients between the ages of 60 and 74 were more likely than those between the ages of 50 and 54 to get timely colonoscopies, while those in their 80s were less likely to do so.

“We encourage patients and health care providers to talk about how and when to test for colorectal cancer, and we encourage health care systems to find ways to support patients and providers in following the guidelines,” she said. “In the future, it will be important to understand what types of reminders work best for different patient populations and in different health care settings.”

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE:Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, news release, Nov. 20, 2018

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


WebMD Health

Exercise May Delay Rare Form of Alzheimer’s

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 — Regular exercise might delay a rare form of early onset Alzheimer’s disease, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that 2.5 hours of walking or other physical activity a week thwarted mental decline tied to autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease (ADAD). This is an inherited form of disease that leads to dementia at an early age.

“The results of this study are encouraging, and not only for individuals with rare genetically caused Alzheimer’s disease,” said Maria Carrillo, chief science officer for the Alzheimer’s Association.

“If further research confirms this relationship between physical activity and later onset of dementia symptoms in ADAD, then we need to expand the scope of this work to see if it also is true in the millions of people with more common, late-onset Alzheimer’s,” Carrillo said in an association news release. She wasn’t involved in the study.

A team led by Dr. Christoph Laske at the University Hospital of Tubingen in Germany examined data on 275 people who carry a genetic mutation for ADAD. The participants’ average age was 38.

The investigators wanted to see if at least 150 minutes per week of walking, running, swimming or other exercise could help delay or slow disease progression.

It may. Those participants who got more physical activity scored higher on brain function assessments, the study found.

They also had lower levels of key biological markers of Alzheimer’s disease in their cerebrospinal fluid, including tau — a protein that builds up in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s.

“A physically active lifestyle is achievable and may play an important role in delaying the development and progression of ADAD,” Laske and his team wrote. “Individuals at genetic risk for dementia should therefore be counseled to pursue a physically active lifestyle.”

The World Health Organization and the American College of Sports Medicine recommend the exercise target of 150 minutes a week.

The study was published online Sept. 25 in Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about Alzheimer’s disease.

© 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: September 2018

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Court Rules Delay for German Medical Cannabis Production

As predicted in December, the cultivation of medical cannabis in Germany will be delayed. On Wednesday, the Düsseldorf Higher Regional Court issued a ruling on a 2017 lawsuit, VII-Verg 40/17, that challenged the process of issuing cultivation licenses for medical cannabis, saying the licensing process was too short for cultivators to be able to prove […]
Marijuana

Many With Depression Delay, Avoid Treatment

THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 — Only one-third of people newly diagnosed with depression start treatment quickly, and seniors and minorities are the least likely to get help in a timely fashion, a new study finds.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 240,000 people in the United States who received a new diagnosis of depression from a primary care provider between 2010 and 2013.

Overall, about 36 percent of those patients got antidepressants or counseling within 90 days of their diagnosis. About half of patients with more severe depression started treatment within that time frame.

Race and age seemed to play a part in the findings.

Asians, blacks and Hispanics were at least 30 percent less likely to begin treatment than whites. And patients aged 60 and older were half as likely to begin treatment as those younger than 44, according to the study.

Among patients who began treatment, more than 80 percent received antidepressants rather than counseling. The investigators found that older patients were far less likely to choose counseling — with rates of 7 percent among patients aged 75 and older, versus 25 percent among patients aged 18 to 29.

All racial and ethnic minorities were more likely than whites to start counseling rather than medication — a finding that highlights the need for health care providers to consider the preferences of patients when considering treatment.

“There was some older, more limited evidence that many people who are diagnosed with depression do not begin treatment, for reasons ranging from stigma to challenges accessing behavioral health services,” said study author Beth Waitzfelder. She is an investigator with the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Honolulu.

Previous research has also shown that some groups of patients are much less likely to receive treatment for depression, she added.

“Our study, which was much larger than previous studies, provides important new evidence about the current scope of the problem among leading health care systems across the country that are striving to improve depression care in primary care settings,” Waitzfelder said in a Kaiser Permanente news release.

“Screening for depression in primary care is a positive step toward improving detection, treatment and outcome for depression, but disparities persist,” she said. “We need a better understanding of the patient and other factors that influence treatment initiation.”

Each year, more than 16 million U.S. adults experience major depression.

“Over the last decade, there has been a growing effort to raise awareness about mental health and to integrate mental health care into primary care,” Waitzfelder said.

“This is a positive development, since most people receive care from primary care providers,” she added. “However, our study shows there is a lot more work to do to understand why many depressed patients do not begin treatment.”

The findings were published Feb. 8 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more on depression.

© 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: February 2018

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Don’t Delay Hip Fracture Surgery. Here’s Why

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Nov. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Seniors with a fractured hip need surgery as soon as possible or they could suffer life-threatening complications, a new Canadian study concludes.

Having surgery within 24 hours decreases the risk of hip fracture-related death. It also lowers odds of problems such as pneumonia, heart attack and blocked arteries, the researchers found.

“We found that there appears to be a safe window, within the first 24 hours,” said lead researcher Daniel Pincus, a doctoral student with the University of Toronto.

“After 24 hours, risk began to clearly increase,” Pincus said.

U.S. and Canadian guidelines recommend hip fracture surgery within 48 hours of injury, but it’s likely that many people don’t receive care that quickly, he noted.

In the United Kingdom, guidelines call for surgery within 36 hours, but hospitals often fail to get patients promptly into the operating room, Pincus added. Rates range from 15 percent to 95 percent among U.K. hospitals, according to the report.

Oftentimes, there’s no operating room or surgeon available, or other patients are awaiting surgery, Pincus explained.

“There’s a triage system and these patients historically were not prioritized,” he said. “Sometimes there’s medical reason for the delay, but that’s very rare. We’re starting to realize there’s almost no reason why a patient should be delayed.”

Delay also likely occurs because doctors approach these elderly patients with a good deal of caution, said Dr. Harry Sax. He is executive vice chair of surgery for Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

“The perception is that if you’re old and you’ve broken your hip, that you’re going to have a lot of other [health problems],” said Sax, co-author of an editorial accompanying the new study. “Therefore, I need to spend several days running tests on you to try to make sure I can get you through the hip fracture surgery. “

To see how this delay affects the health of patients, Pincus and his colleagues evaluated data on over 42,000 people treated for hip fracture at 72 hospitals in Ontario between April 2009 and March 2014. The patients’ average age was 80.

Continued

The investigators compared patients based on whether they had surgery before or after 24 hours.

Overall, about 12 percent of hip fracture patients died within the month following their surgery.

However, patients who got surgery within 24 hours were 21 percent less likely to die during the following month, compared with those who had a delay in surgery, the findings showed.

Those patients also had lower complication rates. They were 82 percent less likely to develop a blood clot in the leg veins (deep vein thrombosis); 61 percent less likely to have a heart attack; and 49 percent less likely to suffer a blood clot in the lung (pulmonary embolism). They were also 5 percent less likely to develop pneumonia during the month following surgery.

“The problem is the longer you sit in bed, the more likely you are to get pneumonia and blood clots. The unfixed bone is continuing to flick off little bits of fat, which can go to the lungs,” Sax said. “The delay doesn’t necessarily make things better. It could make things worse.”

People with an elderly relative facing hip fracture surgery should ask the health care team to get their loved one into surgery as soon as possible, with as little additional testing as possible, Pincus and Sax said.

“A prompt evaluation to make sure there’s nothing quickly correctable should be done, but otherwise the patient should move to the operating room as quickly as possible,” Sax said.

Families should ask doctors about every test, scan or screen that delays the surgery, Sax said.

“The question needs to be, what is the information that you’re going to gain and how would that change your management of this patient,” Sax said. “There are very few things you find with all this expensive testing that you can do anything about.”

The patient would be best off in a hospital that has a specific program to manage elderly people with hip fractures, Sax added. These programs have a team of surgeons, geriatricians, anesthesiologists and other professionals well-versed in the procedure.

Continued

“If you can find a hospital that does that, the chances are your outcomes are going to be better,” Sax said.

The study was published Nov. 28 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Daniel Pincus, doctoral student, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada;  Harry Sax, M.D., executive vice chair, surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles; Nov. 28, 2017,Journal of the American Medical Association

Copyright © 2013-2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

WebMD Health

Florida’s Dept. of Health to Delay Medical Marijuana Treatment Center Licensing

The Florida Senate Health Committee convened this morning and received an update from Christian Bax, Director of the Office of Medical Marijuana Use, on the implementation of regulations in Senate Bill 8A, which was passed by the legislature this summer.

The discussion focused on the application structure for adding additional medical marijuana treatment centers (MMTCs). Last month, a lawsuit was filed challenging the constitutionality of part of the state law that requires a medical marijuana license to go to a black farmer, and today the Office of Medical Marijuana Use said it will not issue any new licenses until the lawsuit is resolved.

When further questioned by the committee, Director Bax said, “We want to move the process as quickly as possible forward,” but cited concerns of legislative process that might invalidate the Department of Health’s licensing. If you’d like to watch Christian Bax’s testimony, the Florida Senate’s Health Policy meeting can be found on its website.

Amendment 2 established a deadline of October 3, 2017 for the Department of Health to issue additional MMTC licenses. If you are a Florida resident, please contact the Office of Medical Marijuana Use, and ask Director Bax to end the delay in medical marijuana licensing so that patients can have more access to treatment.

The post Florida’s Dept. of Health to Delay Medical Marijuana Treatment Center Licensing appeared first on MPP Blog.


MPP Blog

Canadian Premiers Want To Delay Cannabis Legalization

For the cannabis community across Canada, legalization day in July 2018 cannot come soon enough. But for the provinces, the deadline is coming faster than a freight train. At the annual Premier’s Conference this week, the leaders of each province chimed in and shared their progress while airing their grievances over the legalization process. The […]
Marijuana

Vermont House Votes to Delay Legalization Bill

Yesterday, the Vermont Senate amended and passed H. 511, a bill that would make marijuana legal in Vermont. Unfortunately, the House rejected an effort to bring the bill up for consideration, and the veto session ended without further action. H. 511 will have to wait until the Legislature reconvenes — either later this year or in January — before it can pass the House and advance to the desk of Gov. Phil Scott.

A group of representatives led by Rep. Don Turner (R-Milton) delayed passage of H. 511 by opposing a vote to suspend rules and consider the bill. The vote to suspend rules — which required three-quarters of members to vote in favor — was 78-63, considerably short of the 107 votes that would have been needed to consider the bill.

If you are a Vermont resident, you can see how your representatives voted and send them a follow-up message.

The House voted to pass a similar bill earlier this year, so there is little question that H. 511 will pass when it is brought to a vote. Unfortunately, this may not be possible until the Legislature reconvenes in January. It’s also possible that the Legislature will hold a special session later this year, and the bill could be considered then.

On the bright side, H, 511 was not scheduled to take effect until July 1, 2018, so this delay may have no impact on the effective date of legalization.

The post Vermont House Votes to Delay Legalization Bill appeared first on MPP Blog.


MPP Blog

Maine’s Gov. LePage Snubs Bill to Delay Recreational Marijuana?

Loaded with weighty consequences, Maine’s obstinate Gov. LePage made it abundantly clear he has no intention of signing the current moratorium bill state lawmakers hurried through the legislative process on Thursday. As a direct result, Maine’s recently passed ‘Question 1’ could fire up next Monday as scheduled. Despite passing with unanimous approval in Maine’s House […]
Marijuana