After Months of Delays, Los Angeles Begins Licensing for Marijuana sales

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Los Angeles began accepting license applications from marijuana growers, manufacturers and testing companies Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2018, after months of delays that left many businesses in the state’s largest legal marketplace struggling to survive. The start of the process arrived with a mix of relief and anxiety from businesses that have […]
Marijuana

Too Few Kids Screened For Developmental Delays

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, July 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Doctors are supposed to screen young children to see if they’re learning basic skills. But only 17 percent of kids get this critical testing in some places in the United States, a new study finds.

Overall, fewer than one-third of U.S. children under 3 years old receive recommended screening for developmental problems, said researchers at John Hopkins University in Baltimore.

And they found significant differences between states, with Oregon at the top and Mississippi at the bottom.

“Even in the best states, only about half of children are receiving screening and surveillance. We still have a long way to go,” said study co-author Christina Bethell. She directs the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative at Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends screening to identify developmental delays in areas such as small motor skills (“can she hold a crayon?”) and large motor skills (“is he walking?”).

Social and behavioral skills, such as talking, should also be assessed at an early age.

For the study, the researchers analyzed 2016 data and found that only 30 percent of children ages 9 months to 35 months had received a developmental screening in the past year. And only 37 percent had received developmental surveillance.

Fewer than 1 in 5 had received both screening and surveillance, while just over half had received neither, the researchers said.

Screening was defined as asking a parent to complete a questionnaire about developmental observations or concerns. Surveillance was defined as asking parents about developmental concerns.

State differences in rates of screening and surveillance were as high as 40 or more percentage points. For example, screening rates were 59 percent in Oregon and 17 percent in Mississippi. Surveillance rates were 61 percent in Oregon and 19 percent in Mississippi.

Identifying developmental delays at an early age is crucial in providing help before school age, when such problems can affect learning and grades and have lifelong consequences, according to Bethell.

“We need to create comprehensive systems to optimize early child development in the first 1,000 days of life, which we know is dramatically important for child and population health,” Bethell said in a school news release.

The study was published online July 9 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, news release, July 10, 2018

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

WebMD Health

Many Young Kids Not Screened for Developmental Delays

FRIDAY, July 13, 2018 — Doctors are supposed to screen young children to see if they’re learning basic skills. But only 17 percent of kids get this critical testing in some places in the United States, a new study finds.

Overall, fewer than one-third of U.S. children under 3 years old receive recommended screening for developmental problems, said researchers at John Hopkins University in Baltimore.

And they found significant differences between states, with Oregon at the top and Mississippi at the bottom.

“Even in the best states, only about half of children are receiving screening and surveillance. We still have a long way to go,” said study co-author Christina Bethell. She directs the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative at Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends screening to identify developmental delays in areas such as small motor skills (“can she hold a crayon?”) and large motor skills (“is he walking?”).

Social and behavioral skills, such as talking, should also be assessed at an early age.

For the study, the researchers analyzed 2016 data and found that only 30 percent of children ages 9 months to 35 months had received a developmental screening in the past year. And only 37 percent had received developmental surveillance.

Fewer than 1 in 5 had received both screening and surveillance, while just over half had received neither, the researchers said.

Screening was defined as asking a parent to complete a questionnaire about developmental observations or concerns. Surveillance was defined as asking parents about developmental concerns.

State differences in rates of screening and surveillance were as high as 40 or more percentage points. For example, screening rates were 59 percent in Oregon and 17 percent in Mississippi. Surveillance rates were 61 percent in Oregon and 19 percent in Mississippi.

Identifying developmental delays at an early age is crucial in providing help before school age, when such problems can affect learning and grades and have lifelong consequences, according to Bethell.

“We need to create comprehensive systems to optimize early child development in the first 1,000 days of life, which we know is dramatically important for child and population health,” Bethell said in a school news release.

The study was published online July 9 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on developmental delays.

© 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: July 2018

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

FDA Delays New Food Nutrition Labeling Rules

Food makers have received an extension on meeting requirements for updated nutrition and serving size information on product labels, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

The compliance dates have been extended from July 26, 2018 to Jan. 1, 2020 for manufacturers with $ 10 million or more in annual food sales, and from July 26, 2019 to Jan. 1, 2021 for manufacturers with less than $ 10 million in annual food sales.

The final rules for the new labeling requirements were published on May 27, 2016.

“This extension on the Nutrition Facts label regulation will help ensure that we provide the food industry with guidance to help them modernize their Nutrition Facts labels and that industry has sufficient time to complete and print updated Nutrition Facts labels,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said in an agency news release.

“It’s crucial that we provide clear expectations so that industry can meet them. It’s just as important for consumers to be able to effectively use the updated food labels, and we’re launching a major educational campaign for consumers to help them better understand the new nutrition information that they’ll be seeing in the marketplace,” Gottlieb said.

The new nutrition information is meant to reflect current scientific knowledge, including the link between diet and chronic diseases such as obesity and heart disease, according to the FDA.

It’s also meant to make it easier for consumers to be better-informed when choosing foods. For example, the new rule requires that “added sugars” be declared and updates the list of important vitamins and minerals.

The serving size final rule will more accurately reflect what people actually eat and drink and include new labeling requirements for certain size packages, according to the FDA.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

WebMD Health

Canada Experiencing Delays in Recreational Marijuana Rollout

OTTAWA, Ontario (AP) — Canadians will have to wait until at least early August or later to legally purchase recreational marijuana. As recently as last week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government was insisting it was on track for legalization in July. But given a new Senate timetable to pass the legislation, Health Minister Ginette Petitpas […]
Marijuana

Lawsuit Delays the Cultivation of Medical Cannabis in Germany

German company Lexamed has successfully filed a lawsuit against the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices’ (BfArM) selection process for medical cannabis cultivation in Germany, delaying selection and implementation of the country’s medical cannabis cultivation program. Lexamed produces wheelchairs, rollators, and electric drives and wanted to invest in the cultivation of medical cannabis as […]
Marijuana

Delays in Spotting Dementia Can Bring Dangers

THURSDAY June 2, 2016, 2016 — A delay in diagnosing dementia can put people at risk, a new study suggests.

People who have signs of probable dementia but haven’t yet been formally diagnosed are nearly twice as likely as those who’ve been diagnosed to be performing potentially unsafe activities such as cooking, driving, and managing their medications and finances.

The study included information from more than 7,600 Americans. All were 65 or older.

The findings showed:

  • About 17 percent of people diagnosed with dementia and 28 percent of undiagnosed people were still driving.
  • Twelve percent of diagnosed people and 29 percent of undiagnosed people kept handling their finances.
  • Seventeen percent of diagnosed people and 42 percent of undiagnosed people continued to cook meals for themselves.
  • Nearly 22 percent of diagnosed people and 50 percent of undiagnosed people were still handling their own medications.

However, the study did find that people with dementia symptoms — whether undiagnosed or diagnosed with dementia — were less likely to engage in such activities overall.

“That in itself is good news, though the numbers are still important from a public health and safety standpoint. Either the patients themselves or their family members are self-regulating and doing these activities less frequently as their disease is progressing,” said study leader Dr. Halima Amjad.

Amjad is a fellow at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine’s Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, in Baltimore.

Patients and their families need to be aware of dementia so doctors and loved ones can take measures to protect patients, the researchers said.

“When patients receive a formal dementia diagnosis, their families are typically aware that, at some point, their loved ones will not be able to drive or will need more help with their medicine,” Amjad said in a university news release.

“But when people are undiagnosed, families and friends may ignore or be unaware of functional problems that already exist,” she added.

About 5 million people in the United States have some form of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. That number is expected to nearly triple by 2050, the researchers said.

The study findings were published online June 2 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on dementia.

Posted: June 2016

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Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Doll confusion delays Israel-bound flight from Cyprus

Brief panic over a label on a toy box caused a short delay on a flight from Cyprus to Israel on Tuesday when an aircraft cleaner thought it was a warning of a bomb.

The Aegean Airlines flight bound for Tel Aviv via Larnaca, was searched by police at the Cypriot airport on Tuesday after a cleaner found a label with the word “Booba” on it in the Latin alphabet.

“Booba”, which means doll in Hebrew, looks alarmingly like “bomba”, or ‘bomb’ in Greek.

“Cyprus’s civil aviation authority checked it and there was no problem. There was a small delay, but the alarm was lifted immediately,” an Aegean Airlines spokeswoman said in Athens.

(Reporting by Lefteris Karagiannopoulos; Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky)


Reuters: Oddly Enough

Maryland Medical Marijuana Program Facing Delays

Maryland’s comprehensive medical marijuana law took effect on June 1, 2014. Over 23 months later, no patients have been registered, no ID cards have been issued, and dispensary licensees are not expected to be announced until this fall.

The Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission (MMCC), the state agency in charge of establishing Maryland’s medical marijuana program, announced another delay Tuesday in implementation of the medical marijuana law enacted over two years ago.1280px-Flag_of_Maryland.svg While this delay is only a few additional months, it is the latest in a series of delays that will result in medical marijuana not being available until 41 months after the law’s enactment, giving Maryland among the slowest rollouts of a medical marijuana program in the nation.

While we appreciate that the commission is regulating an industry that is new to Maryland, this delay is unreasonable and unnecessary, and every day it continues is another day patients must suffer. Nine states were able to issue patient ID cards in less than one year, with the average being less than seven months.

Although Maryland law requires patients to obtain medical marijuana from a medical dispensary, an ID card would help patients use the existing affirmative defense, protecting them if they are arrested with their medicine. Please ask the commission to issue ID cards NOW and to make sure there are no more delays in getting patients the medicine they need.

The post Maryland Medical Marijuana Program Facing Delays appeared first on MPP Blog.


MPP Blog

Delays in Illinois’ Medical Marijuana Program Leaves Patients Feeling Forgotten

How foolish of those Illinoisans that thought just because former governor Pat Quinn signed legislation permitting the implementation (or serious lack thereof at this point) of a four-year medical marijuana pilot program into law that they were actually going to get access to the plant before the four year’s were up, right?

The law was passed in August of 2013. And for those Illinois residents that feel medical marijuana may be their only hope for reprieve, the clock is quickly winding down on the small, four-year window of permitted use.

Former governor Pat Quinn finished his period in office without having issued the licenses necessary to commence the cultivation and dispensing of medical marijuana via state-authorized distributors.

illinois letterNow, the potential patients that finally received notification from the Illinois Department of Health that they were indeed approved for the program after a ridiculously-long wait can’t even access marijuana. (Legally anyway.)

These delays in fully implementing the Illinois Medical Cannabis Pilot Program has left qualified patients feeling as if the government of Illinois has forgotten about them. And why shouldn’t they feel that way? The law was enacted almost two years ago and not one patient has been able to take full advantage of the program’s objective all because state officials apparently can’t remember how they were voted into office in the first place.

Kelly Sindowski, mother of 3-year-old son Harrison who suffers from a severe form of epilepsy that causes 10-15 seizures a day, was hoping marijuana would ease her son’s pain. But the delays in completing the program’s implementation have left her among the many patients that are feeling frustrated.

“We felt we had a win,” Sindowski declared. “It’s kind of like saying, you won’t get your trophy for another year. It’s rough we are running out of time.”

Patients recently spent time demanding answers in regards to what’s taking so damn long via numerous phone calls to the state’s new head honcho Governor Bruce Rauner’s office only to receive the reply that the matter is “under review”.

What a crock of bureaucratic-bullcrap.

Good luck, qualified medical marijuana program patients of Illinois! You’re really going to need it!

The 420 Times

Illinois’ Medical Marijuana Program Delays Continue into 2015

The voters in Illinois may have approved legislation that legalizes the use of marijuana for medicinal dedications, but state officials are still dragging their feet in respect to making it accessible to the newly accepted roster of patients.

Illinois’ four-year medical marijuana pilot program is diminishing by the day while the powers that be are taking their own sweet time mulling over which applicants will be awarded business licenses.

As we previously reported, it took the Illinois Department of Public Health approximately two years just to decide who would be granted permission to use the program, and now they’ve missed their own slated deadline for approving the licenses for marijuana cultivation centers and dispensaries.

So, what’s the freagin’ hold up here, Governor Quinn? Are you merely toying with those that could truly benefit from using marijuana as a medicine?

Well, according to a statement he made to the Chicago-Sun Times, Illinois’ governor claims that “it is a complicated law and we’re working on it as best we can.” Governor Quinn says “there’s a lot of research to be done, and it has to be done right.”

A total of 159 hopefuls submitted applications to the Illinois Department of Agriculture in hopes of landing one of the 21 allotted licenses to operate a marijuana cultivation center, while 214 contenders have turned in applications with hopes of running one of the 60 state-permitted dispensaries.

So much for getting four years out of that program. Right, Illinoisans?

At this rate, patients that were finally approved may have a couple of weeks that they can actually access marijuana from a state-authorized source.

Wow. How disappointing for those that could’ve benefitted from the program if only the mounds of bureaucratic-bullcrap hadn’t jammed up the whole damn program.

As I’ve said before, good luck with all that nonsense you’re referring to as a medical marijuana program, Illinois. You’re going to need it.

The 420 Times