How to Grow Mass Scale Hemp in a Light Deprivation Greenhouse

The mainstream cannabis cultivation has taken over the hemp industry by storm, especially after many countries legalized weed. Hundreds of hemp cultivators now have greenhouses in their garden where they grow high-quality cannabis that they sell in local markets. But, when it comes to mass-scale production, one of the techniques that work wonders is the light deprivation method. Wondering how the flowers will grow without light? Here’s how the system works.

Hemp Cultivation Using Light Deprivation Technique

One of the advantages of the light deprivation method is it allows the farmer to alter the lighting schedules of the plant. This helps to force the plants into making buds as soon as possible. With the growing demand for hemp in various countries, the light deprivation method comes as a boon to meet such high requirements.

Multiple Harvests In One Year

Imagine yielding four to five harvests in a greenhouse within one year. That’s only possible if you follow the light deprivation method. You should also use a high-quality greenhouse, like the ones manufactured by Full Bloom Light Dep. These come with auto-light facilities so that you can change the lighting conditions and improve the speed at which the plants grow.

If you start sowing seeds in early May, your first harvest will be ready by the end of July. That’s the spring to mid-summer harvest that many farmers consider the best time to grow cannabis. However, you can sneak in another harvest between mid-summer and autumn. Sow seeds immediately after the first harvest and collect the yield by the end of October. This period is also known as natural harvest time.

Better Bud Quality

Compared to commercial hemp farmers growing cannabis outdoors, the bud quality of the hemp growing inside a light deprived greenhouse is far better. If you have multiple light dep. greenhouses, you can increase the yield significantly. This will help to produce better quality buds than the ones you find outdoors. Farmers who grow hemp outdoors can only get one harvest. But, you can manage to get up to five using the light dep. method. It not only increases the overall production but also ensure high-quality bud.

Reduces Catastrophic Failures

Every farmer has a fear at the back of their mind that maybe their crops will experience a catastrophic failure due to bug infestation or heatwave. While this is not impossible, you still have another harvest that can make up for a considerable loss. That is why multiple harvests are better than one. And, that is another reason why the light dep method in a greenhouse is the ideal way to grow mass-scale hemp. When you spread your harvest outdoors, you can’t control catastrophes like heatwaves and extreme rainfall.

So, if you are planning to expand your hemp production, don’t fiddle around with other techniques. Follow the light dep. method religiously, and you should see a satisfactory yield at the end of July and October. But, make sure you grow inside a high-quality greenhouse that supports light dep. technique.

Shane Dwyer
Author: Shane Dwyer
Shane Dwyer is a cannabis advocate who isn’t afraid to tell the world about it! You can find his views, rants, and tips published regularly at The 420 Times.

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Oxygen Deprivation in the Womb May Raise ADHD Risk

MONDAY Dec. 10, 2012 — Children who were deprived of oxygen in the womb or during birth are more likely to develop attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a new study says.

Kaiser Permanente researchers found oxygen deprivation may play a greater role in the prevalence of ADHD than other genetic or familial risk factors for the condition. They noted their findings could help doctors identify and treat children at greater risk for ADHD.

“Previous studies have found that hypoxic injury during fetal development leads to significant structural and functional brain injuries in the offspring. However, this study suggests that the adverse effect of hypoxia and ischemia on prenatal brain development may lead to functional problems, including ADHD,” study author Dr. Darios Getahun, of the Kaiser Permanente Southern California department of research and evaluation, said in a news release. “Our findings could have important clinical implications. They could help physicians identify newborns at risk that could benefit from surveillance and early diagnosis, when treatment is more effective.”

The researchers analyzed the electronic health records of almost 82,000 children ranging in age from 5 to 11. They found that those who were oxygen deprived before birth had a 16 percent greater risk for developing ADHD, while oxygen deprivation during birth was associated with a 26 percent greater risk for the disorder.

The researchers added that neonatal respiratory distress syndrome was associated with a 47 percent greater risk, and children with exposure to preeclampsia (high blood pressure during pregnancy) had a 34 percent higher risk for the condition.

The link between ADHD and oxygen deprivation was strongest in premature births. After taking gestational age and other risk factors into account, the study also revealed children whose deliveries were breech, transverse (shoulder-first) or involved cord complications had a 13 percent higher risk for ADHD.

The researchers noted the link between ADHD and oxygen deprivation applied to children of all races and ethnicities.

While the study showed an association between oxygen deprivation in the womb and ADHD, it did not prove cause-and-effect.

“We suggest future research to focus on pre- and post-natal conditions and the associations with adverse outcomes, such as ADHD,” Getahun added.

In 2005, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated the annual cost of ADHD-related illness in children could be as high as $ 52.4 billion. In 2010, 8.4 percent of children between the ages of 3 and 17 were diagnosed with ADHD.

The study was published online Dec. 10 in the journal Pediatrics.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides more information on ADHD.

Posted: December 2012

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