Menu

Put Safety First When Planning to Pack Food-to-Go

MONDAY, Oct. 14, 2019 — Whether you’re tailgating, cooking for a potluck or bringing in a treat for co-workers, keep safety in mind to avoid food-borne illnesses.

Safe handling is always important, but it’s an even bigger priority when you’re away from your kitchen, without the benefit of your fridge and oven to control food temperatures. The key is to plan ahead to keep food safe until eaten. The golden rule is to keep cold foods cold — below 40 degrees, and keep hot foods hot — above 140 degrees.

Keeping cold food cold means you’ll need to use a cooler with cold packs or lots of ice, and keep it in the shade. Foods that don’t need to be stored in the cooler include whole fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, and peanut butter and jelly.

If you’ll be cooking, such as grilling, at the venue, carry raw food in its own cooler, double wrapped in plastic to contain any juices. Bring disposable wipes for hand washing. If you’re taking food to a friend’s home for a BBQ, for instance, keep meat and poultry refrigerated until ready to put on the grill. Since food may brown before it’s cooked through, test with an instant-read thermometer for safety.

Best Internal Temperature for Cooked Meats

  • Red meat: 145 degrees
  • All ground meat: 160 degrees
  • Poultry: 165 degrees

If cooking in batches, place cooked meats off to the side of the grill rack or in a 200-degree oven until serving. And, of course, never use the same platter and utensils for raw and cooked meat and poultry.

One final note: Any leftover food is safe to take home only if it was kept in a cooler, and the cooler still had ice in it.

More information

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has more tips on food safety when you’re cooking on-the-go.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: October 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

New York State First to Ban Flavored E-Cigarettes

Sept. 18, 2019 — Using his executive powers, New York governor Andrew Cuomo is banning flavored e-cigarettes in the state.

The ban goes into effect immediately and makes New York the first state to institute such a regulation. Michigan will ban some these products, but how the ban is to be structured hasn’t been finalized, according to the Associated Press.

The Public Health and Health Planning Council voted to ban all flavored vaping products except menthol and tobacco flavors.

Stores have two weeks to clear their shelves of these products.

The ban is a reaction to the popularity of flavored e-cigarettes among teens. The state health department says the nearly 40% of high school seniors and 27% of high school students in the state use e-cigarettes, the AP reports.

The ban lasts 90 days and will have to be reinstated if the legislature hasn’t passed bill to permanently ban these products.

The New York legislation comes in the midst of an outbreak of vaping-linked lung illnesses across multiple states. This week, a California man became the seventh person reported to die from a virulent lung illness brought on by using e-cigarettes.

This 40-year-old is the second to die in California and is added to other fatalities from Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota and Oregon, CNN reported.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, so far 380 people in 36 states have come down with the vaping-related lung sickness. On Monday, the agency activated an Emergency Operations Center to investigate these illnes

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });
WebMD Health

FDA to Assess First Peanut Allergy Drug

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 — A panel of experts at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is set to weigh the pros and cons of what could be the first drug ever approved to prevent peanut allergy.

The medicine is called Palforzia, and its capsule contains a pharmaceutical-grade dose of the peanut protein. It’s called “exposure therapy,” aimed at safely desensitizing children to potentially life-threatening peanut allergy.

In one clinical trial, kids who took Palforzia for a year were eventually able to tolerate the equivalent of two peanuts, the Washington Post reported.

But the drug had a downside, too: An increase in allergic reactions plus the need for injections with an epinephrine “pen” to ease those reactions, the Post noted.

No one is calling Palforzia a cure for peanut allergy: Patients will still need to avoid peanuts and carry devices to treat an allergic reaction in an emergency. It’s hoped, though, that Palforzia might help ease concerns about inadvertent exposure to peanut in small amounts.

The drug’s maker, Aimmune, is seeking FDA approval for kids ages 4 to 17.

“For a family with high anxiety and a significant burden of anxiety and fear from living with peanut allergy, this might give that extra buffer of safety,” Marcus Shaker, a pediatric allergist at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine, told the Post.

“They’re still going to need to strictly avoid peanuts, but [this will help] to let go of some of the fear they may have,” said Shaker, who wasn’t involved in the clinical trial.

That trial involved 551 people, 496 of them children. About a tenth of people in the trial dropped out due to side effects such as allergic reactions, abdominal pain or vomiting, the Post said. Fourteen percent of people who did have an allergic reaction needed to use an epinephrine pen to ease that reaction, twice as many as in the arm of the trial where patients got a “dummy” placebo pill.

All of that has patients and researchers uncertain as to which way the FDA panel will decide.

“I think we need more data on what it’s going to mean to patients and how it’s going to change their level of risk perception and change their quality of life,” Shaker said. He believes Palforzia is “a little bittersweet for everybody. Everyone’s happy to see something happening, and yet it’s not what we asked for from Santa Claus.”

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });
WebMD Health

‘First Responders’ on 9/11 Face Lingering Heart Woes, Study Finds

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 — The firefighters who flooded into Ground Zero on 9/11 put their lives on the line to help others. Now, a new study shows they are still paying the price for their selflessness.

Those who were first on the scene or worked for months among the ruins of the World Trade Center disaster in 2001 have an increased risk of heart disease, stroke and heart attack that persists to this day, researchers report.

Their exposure to the airborne dust and fine particles created by the collapse of New York City’s Twin Towers is wreaking long-term havoc on the health of their blood vessels and heart, experts said.

Firefighters first on the scene have a 44% increased risk of heart attack, stroke, heart disease, sudden heart death, cardiac surgery or other life-threatening heart problems, when compared against those who arrived later in the day, researchers found.

Further, those who worked at Ground Zero for six months or more have a 30% higher risk of a heart health emergency than those who worked fewer months on the scene.

The risk from exposure to the World Trade Center disaster was about the same as that associated with chronic high blood pressure, said Dr. Jacqueline Moline, vice president of occupational medicine, epidemiology and prevention for Northwell Health in Manhasset, N.Y.

“The concern is the dust was pro-inflammatory,” said Moline, who treats World Trade Center survivors. “It makes it more likely for particles and platelets and other substances to aggregate in the coronary arteries, and that can lead to more deposits, more plaque, more build-up, more blockage.”

Prior studies have linked World Trade Center exposure with respiratory problems, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and several types of cancer, researchers said in background notes. However, studies of the site’s effect on heart health up to now have produced inconsistent results.

For this study, researchers led by Rachel Zeig-Owens and Hillel Cohen, from the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, tracked 16 years of health records for nearly 9,800 New York City firefighters who worked at Ground Zero.

They divided the firefighters into four groups:

  • Those first on the scene the morning of 9/11, who are believed to have been exposed to the most dust.
  • Those who arrived that afternoon.
  • Those who arrived the day after the attack.
  • Those who arrived 3 to 14 days following the attack.

These firefighters all were very healthy people who had to undergo regular stress tests, breathing tests and physical examinations as part of their job, said Dr. Mary Ann McLaughlin, a cardiologist at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

Three-fourths of the firefighters had never smoked, and were generally in great physical shape prior to 9/11, researchers said.

“These were all healthy workers at the onset of the study,” McLaughlin said. “They excluded anyone from the study who had prior heart disease.”

The results show that exposure to air pollution from the World Trade Center is a heart risk factor all on its own, after accounting for other risk factors like high cholesterol, smoking, excess weight, elevated blood pressure, diabetes and smoking.

“The typical risk factors were present, but the World Trade Center added an additional risk,” Moline said, though the study could not prove that exposure actually caused heart risks to rise.

The greatest heart health problems were faced by those first on the scene, but working a long time at Ground Zero also created an increased risk, researchers found.

“They didn’t have that acute high exposure on that first day, but they had continued lower levels of exposure,” Moline said of people who worked six months or more at the site.

It’s very likely that the heart risk posed by exposure at Ground Zero is even greater than observed in this study, McLaughlin said.

“They may even be underestimating the results of the exposure, because the people they compared to did have some exposure, just less exposure,” McLaughlin said. “The absolute risk of heart disease may even be more if you compared them to a control group that was never exposed.”

Fine particles that are inhaled can make their way into a person’s bloodstream, contributing to inflammation and stiffening of the arteries much in the same way as cigarette smoking, McLaughlin and Moline said. Previous environmental studies have linked particle air pollution to heart health problems.

This study didn’t consider obstructive sleep apnea as a possible risk factor, but that sleep disorder could also contribute to the firefighters’ heart health problems, McLaughlin speculated.

“We know obstructive sleep apnea is considered a World Trade Center condition in those who have chronic sinusitis and snoring,” McLaughlin said. “Sleep apnea is an important risk factor for heart disease as well.”

These results show that people who volunteered at Ground Zero need to pay particular attention to their heart health, Moline said.

In the years to come, it will be crucial that they eat right, exercise, control their blood pressure and cholesterol, and avoid smoking, she said.

“We know you can control all those other risk factors that are still going to be there, so it’s really important for anyone who had World Trade Center exposure that they take care of their heart and achieve good heart health,” Moline said.

The findings were published Sept. 6 in the journal JAMA Network Open.

More information

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has more about the heart health effects of particle pollution.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: September 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

First Death Reported as Cases Linked to Vaping Rise

CDC telebriefing, Aug. 23, 2019.

Louella Amos, MD, pediatric pulmonologist, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

Alessandra Caporale, PhD, post-doctoral researcher, Laboratory for Structural, Physiologic, and Functional Imaging, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

Emily Chapman, MD, chief medical officer, Children’s Minnesota, Minneapolis.

Sven E. Jordt, PhD, associate professor of anesthesiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC.

Albert Rizzo, MD, chief medical officer, American Lung Association, Chicago.

Karen Wilson, MD, chief, Division of General Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Mount Sinai Kravis Children’s Hospital, New York City; chair, American Academy of Pediatrics’ Tobacco Consortium.

Caporale, A. Radiology, Aug. 20, 2019.

CDC: “CDC, FDA, States Continue to Investigate Severe Pulmonary Disease Among People Who Use E-cigarettes.”

CDC: “Notes from the Field: Use of Electronic Cigarettes and Any Tobacco Product Among Middle and High School Students — United States, 2011-2018.”

Erythropel, H. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, July 26, 2019.

WebMD Health

First Death Tied to Lung Injury From Vaping Reported in Illinois

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 — An Illinois resident who was hospitalized after suffering severe respiratory illness related to vaping has died, state health officials reported Friday.

In addition, the number of reported cases of people who have used e-cigarettes or vaped and have been hospitalized with respiratory symptoms has doubled in Illinois this past week, state health officials said in a release. Details were not available on the person who died.

“Yesterday we received a report of a death of an adult who had been hospitalized with severe unexplained respiratory illness after reported vaping or e-cigarette use,” Dr. Jennifer Layden, chief medical officer for the Illinois Department of Public Health, said during a media briefing Friday afternoon with federal health officials.

“Illinois is working with the CDC, FDA, our local health departments and other state health departments to investigate products and devices that individuals have reportedly used,” Layden said.

A total of 22 people in Illinois, ranging in age from 17 to 38, have experienced respiratory illness after using e-cigarettes or vaping. The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) is working with local health departments to investigate another 12 suspected cases, the agency said.

“The severity of illness people are experiencing is alarming and we must get the word out that using e-cigarettes and vaping can be dangerous,” Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the IDPH said in a statement Friday. “We requested a team from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help us investigate these cases and they arrived in Illinois on Tuesday.”

On Friday, CDC officials updated its tally of such cases to 193, spread across 22 states. These cases have emerged in a relatively short timeframe — from June 28 through Aug. 20, agency officials said during a media briefing.

No age group is immune: E-cigarette users ranging from teenagers to middle-aged adults are falling ill with respiratory symptoms that include coughing, shortness of breath and fatigue.

Some patients have had so much trouble breathing that they wound up on a ventilator in their hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU), said Dr. Albert Rizzo, chief medical officer for the American Lung Association.

“We do have to be careful [to say] that this has not been linked to any specific device, or any specific chemical that might exist in a device,” Rizzo said. “The commonality is it’s mainly young people who’ve supposedly been vaping who ended up having respiratory symptoms.”

The respiratory symptoms appear to be caused by inflammation that causes the lungs to fill with fluid, said Dr. Karen Wilson, vice chair of clinical and translational research for the Jack and Lucy Clark Department of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City.

Testing shows that the inflammation is not caused by an infection, leading doctors to seek another explanation for lung irritation, Wilson and Rizzo said.

Wilson first became aware of these cases a month ago, when the teenage son of a family friend wound up in the ICU with lung injuries possibly linked to vaping.

The 17-year-old is improving, and his prognosis is good, Wilson said.

“In general, I think kids are recovering from this, but it’s hard to say if there’s going to be any long-term risk of lung injury or asthma or other illness,” Wilson said.

E-cigarette vapor contains many ingredients that could cause lung irritation, such as ultrafine particles, oil, and heavy metals like nickel, tin and lead, Rizzo said.

Flavored vapor also can contain diacetyl, a chemical linked to a condition called “popcorn lung,” Rizzo noted. The condition is so named because more than a decade ago workers in a microwave popcorn factory developed lung ailments after breathing in butter-flavored diacetyl.

In popcorn lung, the tiny air sacs in the lungs become scarred, resulting in the thickening and narrowing of the airways, the American Lung Association explained.

There’s also the possibility that heavy levels of nicotine are affecting the lungs, Rizzo added.

“One of the more common e-cigarettes contains as much nicotine in a pod as in a whole pack of cigarettes,” Rizzo said. “It’s very hard to smoke a pack of cigarettes in 15 minutes. You can ingest a whole pod by vaping in 15 minutes.”

The CDC has also noted that recent marijuana use could be a factor.

“In many cases, patients have acknowledged recent use of tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]-containing products while speaking to health care personnel or in follow-up interviews by health department staff,” the agency said. THC is the chemical in pot that gives users a high.

Wilson believes that parents should make sure their teenagers aren’t vaping, and also refrain from vaping in the presence of kids, to prevent secondhand exposure.

“Particularly for adolescents and young adults, they should not have access to these products and they should not use them,” Wilson said. “This is more evidence they’re not a safe product for teenagers and young adults.”

More information

The American Lung Association has more about e-cigarettes and popcorn lung.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: August 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

First Death Tied to Lung Injury From Vaping Reported in Illinois

By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) — An Illinois resident who was hospitalized after suffering severe respiratory illness related to vaping has died, state health officials reported Friday.

In addition, the number of reported cases of people who have used e-cigarettes or vaped and have been hospitalized with respiratory symptoms has doubled in Illinois this past week, state health officials said in a release. Details were not available on the person who died.

“Yesterday we received a report of a death of an adult who had been hospitalized with severe unexplained respiratory illness after reported vaping or e-cigarette use,” Dr. Jennifer Layden, chief medical officer for the Illinois Department of Public Health, said during a media briefing Friday afternoon with federal health officials.

“Illinois is working with the CDC, FDA, our local health departments and other state health departments to investigate products and devices that individuals have reportedly used,” Layden said.

A total of 22 people in Illinois, ranging in age from 17 to 38, have experienced respiratory illness after using e-cigarettes or vaping. The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) is working with local health departments to investigate another 12 suspected cases, the agency said.

“The severity of illness people are experiencing is alarming and we must get the word out that using e-cigarettes and vaping can be dangerous,” Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the IDPH said in a statement Friday. “We requested a team from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help us investigate these cases and they arrived in Illinois on Tuesday.”

On Friday, CDC officials updated its tally of such cases to 193, spread across 22 states. These cases have emerged in a relatively short timeframe — from June 28 through Aug. 20, agency officials said during a media briefing.

No age group is immune: E-cigarette users ranging from teenagers to middle-aged adults are falling ill with respiratory symptoms that include coughing, shortness of breath and fatigue.

Some patients have had so much trouble breathing that they wound up on a ventilator in their hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU), said Dr. Albert Rizzo, chief medical officer for the American Lung Association.

Continued

“We do have to be careful [to say] that this has not been linked to any specific device, or any specific chemical that might exist in a device,” Rizzo said. “The commonality is it’s mainly young people who’ve supposedly been vaping who ended up having respiratory symptoms.”

The respiratory symptoms appear to be caused by inflammation that causes the lungs to fill with fluid, said Dr. Karen Wilson, vice chair of clinical and translational research for the Jack and Lucy Clark Department of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City.

Testing shows that the inflammation is not caused by an infection, leading doctors to seek another explanation for lung irritation, Wilson and Rizzo said.

Wilson first became aware of these cases a month ago, when the teenage son of a family friend wound up in the ICU with lung injuries possibly linked to vaping.

The 17-year-old is improving, and his prognosis is good, Wilson said.

“In general, I think kids are recovering from this, but it’s hard to say if there’s going to be any long-term risk of lung injury or asthma or other illness,” Wilson said.

E-cigarette vapor contains many ingredients that could cause lung irritation, such as ultrafine particles, oil, and heavy metals like nickel, tin and lead, Rizzo said.

Flavored vapor also can contain diacetyl, a chemical linked to a condition called “popcorn lung,” Rizzo noted. The condition is so named because more than a decade ago workers in a microwave popcorn factory developed lung ailments after breathing in butter-flavored diacetyl.

In popcorn lung, the tiny air sacs in the lungs become scarred, resulting in the thickening and narrowing of the airways, the American Lung Association explained.

There’s also the possibility that heavy levels of nicotine are affecting the lungs, Rizzo added.

“One of the more common e-cigarettes contains as much nicotine in a pod as in a whole pack of cigarettes,” Rizzo said. “It’s very hard to smoke a pack of cigarettes in 15 minutes. You can ingest a whole pod by vaping in 15 minutes.”

Continued

The CDC has also noted that recent marijuana use could be a factor.

“In many cases, patients have acknowledged recent use of tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]-containing products while speaking to health care personnel or in follow-up interviews by health department staff,” the agency said. THC is the chemical in pot that gives users a high.

Wilson believes that parents should make sure their teenagers aren’t vaping, and also refrain from vaping in the presence of kids, to prevent secondhand exposure.

“Particularly for adolescents and young adults, they should not have access to these products and they should not use them,” Wilson said. “This is more evidence they’re not a safe product for teenagers and young adults.”

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Aug. 23, 2019, media briefing, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;  Aug. 23, 2019, statement, Illinois Department of Public Health; Albert Rizzo, M.D., chief medical officer,  American Lung Association; Karen Wilson, M.D., MPH, vice chair, clinical and translational research, Jack and Lucy Clark Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City;CBS News, CNN

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

Pagination

WebMD Health

‘Children of Blood and Bone’ Lucasfilm’s First Franchise Departure Since Disney Buy

A feature adaptation of bestselling fantasy novel Children of Blood and Bone planned for Fox 2000 is going ahead under the new Disney leadership, and Deadline reports that Lucasfilm is set to produce since the project caught studio chief Kathleen Kennedy’s attention. Nigerian-American author Tomi Adeyemi’s tale of a gifted young woman a mission to bring magic back to her world would be the studio’s first film outside the Star Wars and Indiana Jones franchises since it was acquired by Walt Disney Co.

WGA Award nominee Kay Oyegun (This Is Us) is on deck to write a new script for the film, which has Image Award-winning writer/director Rick Famuyiwa (Dope, Talk to Me, The Chi) attached to direct. Famuyiwa is directing episodes of the Disney+ Star Wars series The Mandalorian, premiering later this year, and has been tapped for Sony’s graphic novel adaptation Son of Shaolin.

Original producers Marty Brown, Isaac Klausner and John Fischer (Temple Hill), Karen Rosenfelt (Sunswept Ent.) and Famuyiwa (VERSE) will continue to be involved.

Children of Blood and Bone was published in 2018 by Holt Books for Young Readers. The second book in the Legacy of Orisha series, Children of Virtue and Vengeance, is due later this year.

Book synopsis: Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls. But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope. Now, Zélie has one chance to bring back magic and strike against the monarchy.

With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must outwit and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good. Danger lurks in Orïsha, where snow leoponaires prowl and vengeful spirits wait in the waters. Yet the greatest danger may be Zélie herself as she struggles to control her powers and her growing feelings for an enemy.

[Source: Deadline]

Children of Blood and Bone

Children of Blood and Bone

Tomi Adeyemi

Tomi Adeyemi

Rick Famuyiwa

Rick Famuyiwa

Kay Oyegun

Kay Oyegun

Animation Magazine

First Tokenized Anime Film ‘Vevara in Your Dream’ Debuts

Singapore-based entertainment tech startup BlockPunk recently presented the U.S. premiere of Vevara in Your Dream during Anime Expo in Los Angeles. The first feature by innovative, up-and-coming director syo5 (“Shogo”) was self-produced at the Tokyo University of the Arts, and is being distributed by BlockPunk in collaboration with leading indie anime studio Arch Inc.

What makes the project unique is that it is pioneering the use of blockchain tokens in anime content distribution. A limited quantity of 500 tokens are available at $ 15 USD each or the equivalent in Ether crypto currency. These video tokens entitle the owner to the streaming version of the movie, along with exclusive extras such as the director’s audio commentary, production artwork and designs for the film, and the chance to win an exclusive artwork from the director himself for one lucky token holder.

Once the tokens have sold out, each token is tradeable on the BlockPunk platform with a percentage going back to the creator. The video is protected with industry-standard DRM and recorded on blockchain to protect the creators rights.

“Anime fans buy Blu-ray box sets in order to support their favorite creators, however only a tiny percentage actually goes back to the creator. With this model, fans can now buy video directly from their favorite creator, and know that the majority will go back to the source. In addition, they get access to exclusive extras and have the ability to resell in a digital format, all secured on blockchain,” said Julian Lai-Hung, BlockPunk’s founder. “Our goal is to uncover new anime voices and talent from Japan to share with the world and we are thrilled to be able to support syo5 and Studio Arch with this amazing debut movie.”

“It’s a delight to work with syo5 and BlockPunk on this unique collaboration. I’m very keen to see how blockchain can help create new connections between creators and fans across the world,” said Nao Hirasawa, founder and CEO of studio Arch Inc.

“I’m very excited to share my film at Anime Expo and meet with fans from around the world. I hope you enjoy the movie and get some insight into how it was made through the artwork bundled with the movie,” said syo5.

Vevara in Your Dream is available to purchase on BlockPunk here.

Synopsis: In her dream, Sana meets Vevara — a creature who paints pictures on the ground with a cane. What becomes a nightly rendezvous brings her deeper into a fantasy world. It’s strange, but fun. One day her dream clashes with reality, producing a nightmare with some bad memories. Vevara steps in to help …

Animation Magazine

Disney Flies First Look at 2nd VR Short ‘a kite’s tale’ at SIGGRAPH

Walt Disney Animation Studios, for the second year in a row, will debut an all-new VR short film at the SIGGRAPH conference (July 28-August 1, Los Angeles). Part of the third annual SIGGRAPH 2019 VR Theater.

Directed by Bruce Wright, a kite’s tale combines classic hand-drawn animation and the latest innovations in virtual reality to tell a whimsical tale of two kites — a playful puppy (with a wagging tail) and a pompous dragon — who clash, tangle and ultimately must learn to live with one another subject to the winds of fate.

“I’m thrilled that a kite’s tale is premiering at SIGGRAPH 2019’s VR Theater,” said Wright. “Virtual reality has the ability to bring us into new worlds of story, and touch the hearts of the audience in never before dreamt of ways. It’s an honor to showcase our film at SIGGRAPH for the innovators and artists who are shaping the future of this medium.”

a kite’s tale was created within Disney Animation’s innovative Short Circuit program, which gives anyone within the studio the opportunity to participate in a blind submission and be selected for the opportunity to direct their short film idea. The program has produced 20 short films thus far, with a kite’s tale being the second VR film (the first, Cycles debuted at SIGGRAPH 2018).

“We’re still on the cusp of a powerful new medium, and I cannot wait for audiences to experience what Disney has done with its second VR short,” said SIGGRAPH 2019 VR Theater Director Maxwell Planck. “It’s encouraging and exciting to see studios and artists with proven success in more traditional computer graphics contribute to the next evolution of storytelling, and further proves that the seeds we are planting are strong.”

Born in Los Angeles, and raised in Redondo Beach and Lomita, California, Bruce Wright’s interest in animation was awakened in 1985 when, as a high school newspaper reporter, he attended a special screening of the Disney classic Fantasia, followed by a discussion with legendary Disney animators Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston. Inspired, he purchased a Super-8 film camera and started making movies. After attending Cal State Long Beach, where he majored in film and television studies, he went on to work at Paramount Pictures, where he founded an experimental desktop graphics and visual effects lab, and contributed to such projects as Addams Family Values and Star Trek: Generations.

Wright began his association with Disney in 1996 as a live-action visual effects animator at Dream Quest Images, where he worked on Armageddon and George of the Jungle. His Disney Animation feature credits include effects animation on Tangled, Wreck-It Ralph, Big Hero 6, Zootopia, Ralph Breaks the Internet and, most recently, Frozen 2. Bruce and his wife, Tekla, have a teenage daughter. An accomplished magician, he can often be found dabbling in sleight of hand as a member of the world-famous Magic Castle.

Animation Magazine

In a U.S. First, Baby Is Delivered From Womb Transplanted From Deceased Donor

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 — Doctors at the Cleveland Clinic announced that they’ve achieved a first in North America: delivering a baby from a uterus that had been transplanted from a deceased donor.

The healthy baby girl was delivered by C-section in June. This is only the second time such a delivery has happened worldwide, the first having occurred in Brazil in December.

“We couldn’t have asked for a better outcome. Everything went wonderfully with the delivery, the mother and baby girl are doing great,” Dr. Uma Perni, a Cleveland Clinic maternal-fetal medicine specialist, said in a hospital news release.

Perni stressed that “it’s important to remember this is still research. The field of uterus transplantation is rapidly evolving, and it’s exciting to see what the options may be for women in the future.”

According to the Cleveland Clinic, the baby’s mother required a uterus transplant due to a condition called uterine factor infertility, which affects about one in every 500 women of childbearing age.

The unnamed woman was in her mid-30s when she joined an ongoing clinical trial at Cleveland Clinic, exploring the possibility of uterus transplant to help her bear a child.

In late 2017, the patient underwent transplant surgery and received a uterus from a deceased donor. In late 2018, she conceived through in vitro fertilization, her medical team said.

“It was amazing how perfectly normal this delivery was, considering how extraordinary the occasion,” said Cleveland Clinic transplant surgeon Dr. Andreas Tzakis.

“Through this research, we aim to make these extraordinary events ordinary for the women who choose this option. We are grateful to the donor and her family,” Tzakis added. “Their generosity allowed our patient’s dream to come true and a new baby to be born.”

Specialists from many departments collaborated on the effort: transplant surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, fertility, neonatology, bioethics, psychiatry, nursing, anesthesiology, infectious disease, interventional radiology, patient advocacy and social work.

The baby’s delivery is expected to be just the first of many, the Cleveland Clinic team said. So far, five uterus transplants have already been completed.

“Three transplants were successful and two resulted in hysterectomies,” the clinic said. “Currently, two women are awaiting embryo transfers, while several more candidates are listed for transplant.”

The clinic said their program seeks to eliminate risks to living donors by only sourcing the transplanted uterus from a deceased donor.

More information

The U.S. Office on Women’s Health has more on female infertility.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: July 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews