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What Foods Are Most Likely to Cause Acne Breakouts?

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 — Certain eating habits, high levels of stress and exposure to pollution are among the greatest factors associated with acne, researchers say.

They studied links to acne in more than 6,700 people from six countries in Europe and the Americas. The analysis showed that many more people with acne consume dairy products each day than those without acne — 48.2% versus 38.8%.

The same was true for soda, juices or syrups (35.6% versus 31%); pastries and chocolate (37% versus 27.8%); as well as other sweets (29.7% versus 19.1%).

The study also found that 11% of acne sufferers consume whey proteins compared to 7% of those without acne. And 11.9% of acne sufferers use anabolic steroids versus 3.2% of others.

Exposure to pollution and stress was also more common among people with acne, and they were also more likely to use harsh skin care practices.

The findings reflected an association with acne, but not a cause-and-effect link. The study was scheduled to be presented Saturday at a meeting of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV), in Madrid.

Lead author Dr. Brigitte Dreno, head of dermatology at University Hospital of Nantes in France, noted that acne is one of the most common reasons people see a dermatologist.

“Its severity and response to treatment may be influenced by internal and external factors, which we call the exposome,” Dreno said in a meeting news release. “For the first time, this study allows us to identify the most important exposome factors relating to acne from patient questioning prior to any treatment prescription.”

Previous research has suggested that tobacco use is an acne trigger, but this study did not link tobacco with acne.

Acne affects about 1 in 10 people worldwide, and as many as 40% of adult women.

“Understanding, identifying and reducing the impact of exposome is important for an adequate acne disease management as it may impact on the course and severity of acne as well as on treatment efficacy,” said Dreno, who is also chair of the meeting’s Scientific Programming Committee.

Research presented at meetings is typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on acne.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: October 2019

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Do You Need Vitamin-Enhanced Foods?

MONDAY, July 8, 2019 — Many packaged foods have the potential to give you vitamin overload, especially if you’re already taking a daily multivitamin. Here’s what you need to know.

Manufacturers have been adding nutrients to foods for decades. In fact, it started nearly 100 years ago with the addition of iodine to salt. Vitamins and minerals are added to foods in two key ways.

Foods and beverages can be “enriched.” This means putting back nutrients lost in processing, like the longstanding practice of adding B vitamins to packaged breads and cereals made with refined flours. Keep in mind that this doesn’t necessarily make them as nutrient-dense as foods made with whole grains, because not every natural micronutrient lost in processing can be replaced.

Foods and beverages can be “fortified.” This means adding one or more nutrients not normally found in the food in its natural state. Sometimes this is helpful — adding hard-to-get vitamin D to milk, adding calcium to non-dairy milks and orange juice for those who are lactose intolerant, and adding omega-3 fatty acids to eggs for people who don’t eat enough fatty fish.

But some foods are fortified with levels of nutrients that exceed limits set by the Institute of Medicine. And sometimes they’re just not necessary for you. For instance, according to a University of Toronto study, the most common vitamins added to fortified waters are already abundant in the average diet.

A report from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns that vitamin-fortified snack foods are among the most misleading. Researchers found that people are less likely to look past front-of-box claims on snack foods to read the Nutrition Facts label, and they choose fortified snacks over healthier products. When shopping, always remember that adding nutrients to a food that’s full of empty calories doesn’t make it healthy.

More information

Consumer Reports has more on the potential dangers of fortified foods.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: July 2019

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Whole Foods Recalling Two Pesto Products

FRIDAY, June 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Whole Foods is recalling two pesto products because they contain ingredients not listed on the label, namely, milk, pine nuts and walnuts, the company said in a news release issued Thursday.

The recall is limited to 41 Whole Foods stores in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island. The two products are Whole Foods made-in-house basil pesto and made-in-house sundried tomato pesto.

The voluntary recall is being done to prevent people allergic to these foods from having a potentially severe allergic reaction, which can be life-threatening. So far, one allergic reaction has been reported, the company said.

Whole Foods has taken these products off their shelves.

The products sold between May 17 and June 4, can be identified by the PLU code beginning with 255926 on the basil pesto label and by the PLU code beginning with 256009 on the sundried tomato pesto.

Whole Foods will refund the price of the pesto to customer who can show a valid receipt.

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Whole Foods Likely to Start Selling Marijuana Products

You know that marijuana has gone mainstream when big box retailers like Whole Foods are jumping aboard the gravy train.  It was discussed on Thrillist that the reality of the situation is that Whole Foods is “very likely” to start selling marijuana products in the near future as legalization continues to steam roll through the USA on a State by State level.

In New York City, there’s already been some banter from bodega owners who are trying to legally sell weed with the legalization in New York right around the corner.  They may have some stiff competition if weed buyers across the nation are able to bag their groceries along with a bag of weed!

Whole Foods to Sell Marijuana?

produceThe CEO of Whole Foods, John Mackey, mentioned during a panel discussion courtesy of the Texas Tribune that there is a “good” chance they will end up stocking marijuana at the popular grocery store owned by Amazon.com.  This was preceded by a question about whether they would sell “alternative proteins” such as bugs.  Mackey has been vocal about legalizing marijuana in the past.

“If cannabis is ever passed in Texas, chances are good that grocery stores will be selling that too,” he said during the conversation. “You just never know what happens over time with markets. They change and evolve.”

The author of the story, Cailin Hitt, also points out that Whole Food is a high end grocer with steep price points, and she alludes to the fact that marijuana may be cheaper elsewhere.  I totally agree with that, even being a loyal Whole Foods customer myself.  However, there is a price for convenience, and if you are already there, well hey, may as well get a bag of weed to go along with that garlicky kale salad or fresh chicken soup.  The idea of being able to pick up weed there, and smoke it remotely close to the location, if not there, makes sense.  People will get high, get the munchies, and spend more.  While the CEO didn’t go there, I have to think that’s where his head is at here.

Also in the article was a mention that Whole Foods hired a “seasoned trend-spotter.”  This is something interesting and something more companies should have. This person made a list of the hottest products to launch in 2019, and as you probably guessed, hemp products were in the top 10 most in-demand.

It’s no secret that the cannabis business is booming.  We’ve seen some of our most trafficked pages on The420Times be our product review pages that stem from hemp products.  The best eye cream we can endorse is made from hemp oil.  Even pain relievers like Advil have taken a back seat to pain relief rubs with CBD and hemp.

We’re in an exciting time, and I’m glad it appears that Whole Foods is embracing marijuana with open arms.  With the medical benefits of hemp and CBD, it’s no doubt that this will be fully mainstream in the very near future, and we’ll be hear to let you know who is on board, every step of the way.

Whole Foods Likely to Start Selling Marijuana Products

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Shane Dwyer
Author: Shane Dwyer
Shane Dwyer is a cannabis advocate who isn’t afraid to tell the world about it! You can find his views, rants, and tips published regularly at The 420 Times.

Marijuana & Cannabis News – The 420 Times

‘Ultraprocessed’ Foods Tied to Higher Death Risk

Feb. 12, 2019 — They may be convenient, but eating ultraprocessed foods could increase your risk of early death, a new study warns.

“Ultraprocessed foods are mostly consumed in the form of snacks, desserts, or ready-to-eat or -heat meals,” and their consumption “has largely increased during the past several decades,” wrote the authors of the study in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, CNNreported.

The study included more than 44,000 adults, 45 and older, in France who were followed for two years.

The researchers found that each 10 percent increase in the amount of ultraprocessed foods consumed was associated with a 14 percent higher risk of early death, CNN reported.

Ultraprocessed foods accounted for more than 14 percent of the weight of total food consumed by the participants, and about 29 percent of their total calories.

Further research is need to confirm the study findings, said the authors, who suggested that additives, packaging (chemicals get into the food during storage) and the processing itself (including high-temperature processing) may be why ultraprocessed foods can harm health, CNN reported.

The “findings make sense, given what we know to date about the deleterious effects of food additives on brain function and health, but the effects observed are very small,” Molly Bray, chairwoman of the department of nutritional sciences at the University of Texas at Austin, told CNN.

She was not involved in the study.

There are many kinds of ultraprocessed foods and the study could not pinpoint exactly what might make them a threat to health, according to Nurgul Fitzgerald, associate professor, Department of Nutritional Sciences at Rutgers University. She was not involved in the study.

“Some factors may be more harmful or less harmful than others. It’s really too complex,” Fitzgerald told CNN, and added that we can’t “run with” these results.

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Tyson Foods Recalls Chicken Nuggets

Jan. 30, 2019 — About 36,420 pounds of chicken nuggets are being recalled by Tyson Foods because they may be contaminated with rubber.

The recalled 5-pound plastic packages of “Tyson White Meat Panko Chicken Nuggets,” were produced on November 26, 2018. They have a use-by date of November 26, 2019, a case code “3308SDL03” on the label, and the establishment number “P-13556” inside the USDA mark of inspection, according to the US Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), CNN reported.

The chicken nuggets were shipped to stores across the U.S.

There haven’t been any confirmed reports of illness from eating the chicken nuggets, according to FSIS, which is concerned that people may still have the recalled products in their freezers, CNN reported.

“These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase,” FSIS said.

For more information, consumers can call Tyson Consumer Relations at 1-888-747-7611.

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Foods That Can Lead to Obesity in Kids