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Vision Problems Strike More Than 2 Billion Globally

By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — More than 2 billion people worldwide suffer vision problems that range from impairment to blindness, according to a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO).

And at least 1 billion of those people have problems such as short- and far-sightedness, glaucoma and cataracts — all of which could have been prevented or have not been treated.

Eye conditions and vision impairment are widespread, and far too often they still go untreated,” Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, said in a news release from the organization.

“People who need eye care must be able to receive quality interventions without suffering financial hardship. Including eye care in national health plans and essential packages of care is an important part of every country’s journey towards universal health coverage,” he said.

Aging populations, changing lifestyles and limited access to eye care — particularly in low- and middle-income countries — are among the main reasons for increasing numbers of people with vision problems, according to the report released Tuesday in advance of World Sight Day on Oct. 10.

“It is unacceptable that 65 million people are blind or have impaired sight when their vision could have been corrected overnight with a cataract operation, or that over 800 million struggle in everyday activities because they lack access to a pair of glasses,” he added.

Eye conditions and vision impairment tend to be much more common among people in rural areas, those with low incomes, women, older people, people with disabilities, ethnic minorities and indigenous populations, according to the WHO’s first report on vision worldwide.

Untreated distance vision impairment in low- and middle-income regions is about four times higher than in high-income regions, and $ 14.3 billion (U.S. dollars) is needed to treat the 1 billion people with vision impairment or blindness due to cataracts, and short- and far-sightedness, the report said.

According to Alarcos Cieza, who leads WHO’s efforts on blindness and deafness prevention, disability and rehabilitation, “Millions of people have severe vision impairment and are not able to participate in society to their fullest because they can’t access rehabilitation services. In a world built on the ability to see, eye care services, including rehabilitation, must be provided closer to communities for people to achieve their maximum potential.”

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Sources

SOURCE: World Health Organization, news release, Oct. 8, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Vision Problems Strike More Than 2 Billion Globally

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 — More than 2 billion people worldwide suffer vision problems that range from impairment to blindness, according to a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO).

And at least 1 billion of those people have problems such as short- and far-sightedness, glaucoma and cataracts — all of which could have been prevented or have not been treated.

Eye conditions and vision impairment are widespread, and far too often they still go untreated,” Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, said in a news release from the organization.

“People who need eye care must be able to receive quality interventions without suffering financial hardship. Including eye care in national health plans and essential packages of care is an important part of every country’s journey towards universal health coverage,” he said.

Aging populations, changing lifestyles and limited access to eye care — particularly in low- and middle-income countries — are among the main reasons for increasing numbers of people with vision problems, according to the report released Tuesday in advance of World Sight Day on Oct. 10.

“It is unacceptable that 65 million people are blind or have impaired sight when their vision could have been corrected overnight with a cataract operation, or that over 800 million struggle in everyday activities because they lack access to a pair of glasses,” he added.

Eye conditions and vision impairment tend to be much more common among people in rural areas, those with low incomes, women, older people, people with disabilities, ethnic minorities and indigenous populations, according to the WHO’s first report on vision worldwide.

Untreated distance vision impairment in low- and middle-income regions is about four times higher than in high-income regions, and $ 14.3 billion (U.S. dollars) is needed to treat the 1 billion people with vision impairment or blindness due to cataracts, and short- and far-sightedness, the report said.

According to Alarcos Cieza, who leads WHO’s efforts on blindness and deafness prevention, disability and rehabilitation, “Millions of people have severe vision impairment and are not able to participate in society to their fullest because they can’t access rehabilitation services. In a world built on the ability to see, eye care services, including rehabilitation, must be provided closer to communities for people to achieve their maximum potential.”

More information

The WHO has more on blindness and vision impairment.

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Posted: October 2019

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Lionsgate Sells ‘BoJack Horseman’ Globally at MIPCOM

Netflix’s acclaimed animated sitcom star is getting ready to race around the world, thanks to Lionsgate’s distribution arm. The distributor is selling Tornante-produced BoJack Horseman for the first time this year. The first three seasons of the show are already dubbed into 11 languages, ready for consumers in different territories. Lionsgate’s deal with Michael Eisner’s Tornante also includes season four and five at a later date, and includes some buyers on-demand rights.

Jim Packer, president of worldwide television and digital distribution for Lionsgate, told Variety. “Animated comedies are hard – they are not easy to produce, but they work incredibly well in syndication,” he said. “These shows tend to perform at a level that allows them to get licensed year after year internationally. BoJack has a great footprint and people could have watched it on Netflix, but when you put it into the Comedy Central environment, it did incredibly well because there are still a lot of people who either still hadn’t watched the show, didn’t know about it, or maybe had watched later episodes,” Packer said

Tornante founder Eisner added, “BoJack was an early show for Netflix, starting in the U.S., before the streamer extended its deal to cover streaming rights for English-speaking and then international territories. I always wanted to be able to control its destiny. They have such a giant library now I think they are interested in the experiment and how will it do post-streaming on Comedy Central, and how will it do post-streaming [on TV] in the U.K., Germany, and the rest of the world,” he said.

The fifth season of the Emmy and Annie-nominated show debuted on Netflix last month. The series was created by Raphael Bob-Waksberg and designed by cartoonist Lisa Hanawalt, and features Will Arnett as the title character, a depressed former sitcom horse-star and co-stars Amy Sedaris, Alison Brie, Paul F. Tomkins and Aaron Paul. The series debuted in August of 2014.

Here is the show’s season five trailer:

Source: Variety

Animation Magazine

Alcohol Helps Kill 2.8 Million Globally Each Year

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Aug. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Alcohol contributes to 2.8 million deaths a year worldwide, and there is no safe level of alcohol consumption, researchers say.

The new analysis of hundreds of studies conducted between 1990 and 2016 found that one in three people worldwide (2.4 billion people) drink alcohol, and that 6.8 percent of men and 2.2 percent of women die of alcohol-related health problems each year.

How the United States fits into those figures is unclear. It was not among the top or bottom 10 for the most or the heaviest drinkers in 2016. Denmark led the list for most drinkers (97 percent of men and 95 percent of women), while Romania (men) and Ukraine (women) had the heaviest drinkers.

Worldwide, alcohol use was the seventh-leading risk factor for early death and disability in 2016. It was the top cause for early death and disability among 15- to 49-year-olds, accounting for one in 10 deaths. In this age group, the main causes of alcohol-related deaths were tuberculosis (1.4 percent), road injuries (1.2 percent) and self-harm (1.1 percent), the findings showed.

Among people 50 and older, cancer was a leading cause of alcohol-related death, accounting for 27 percent of deaths in women and nearly 19 percent of deaths in men.

Any protection alcohol may provide against heart disease is outweighed by the health problems it causes, particularly cancer, according to the authors of the study, published Aug. 23 in The Lancet.

The researchers calculated that people who have one standard drink (10 grams of pure alcohol) a day have a 0.5 percent higher risk of one of 23 alcohol-related health problems than teetotalers.

The risk was 7 percent higher in people who had two drinks a day, and 37 percent higher among people who had five drinks every day, according to the report.

“We found that the combined health risks associated with alcohol increase with any amount of alcohol. In particular, the strong association between alcohol consumption and the risk of cancer, injuries and infectious diseases offset the protective effects for ischemic heart disease in women in our study,” study lead author Max Griswold said in a journal news release.

Continued

“Although the health risks associated with alcohol starts off being small with one drink a day, they then rise rapidly as people drink more,” Griswold added. He is a researcher at the University of Washington Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, in Seattle.

“Policies focusing on reducing alcohol consumption to the lowest levels will be important to improve health. The widely held view of the health benefits of alcohol needs revising, particularly as improved methods and analyses continue to shed light on how much alcohol contributes to global death and disability,” Griswold said.

According to Robyn Burton of King’s College London, in England, “The conclusions of the study are clear and unambiguous: alcohol is a colossal global health issue and small reductions in health-related harms at low levels of alcohol intake are outweighed by the increased risk of other health-related harms, including cancer.”

The new study offers strong support for a guideline published by the chief medical officer of the United Kingdom, “who found that there is ‘no safe level of alcohol consumption,’ ” Burton wrote in an editorial that accompanied the study.

“The solutions are straightforward: increasing taxation creates income for hard-pressed health ministries, and reducing the exposure of children to alcohol marketing has no downsides,” Burton concluded.

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Sources

SOURCE:The Lancet, news release, Aug. 23, 2018

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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