Menu

However the World Health Organization also noted that more research is needed into how microplastics may impact human health and the environment, the Associated Press reported.

THURSDAY, Aug. 22, 2019 — Levels of microplastics in drinking water don’t appear to be a health risk, according to the World Health Organization.

However the U.N. health agency also noted that more research is needed into how microplastics may impact human health and the environment, the Associated Press reported.

Microplastics — tiny particles smaller than about one-fifth of an inch — are “ubiquitous in the environment” and have been found in drinking water, including tap and bottled, the WHO said in the report released Wednesday.

“But just because we’re ingesting them doesn’t mean we have a risk to human health,’ said Bruce Gordon, WHO’s coordinator of water, sanitation and hygiene, the AP reported.

“The main conclusion is, I think, if you are a consumer drinking bottled water or tap water, you shouldn’t necessarily be concerned,” according to Gordon.

However, he noted that available data on microplastics is “weak” and said more research is needed. He also called for increased efforts to reduce plastic pollution, the AP reported.

Microplastics in water don’t appear to be a health threat at the moment, but “I wouldn’t want people to go away with the idea that microplastics are no longer important,” said Andrew Mayes, a senior lecturer in chemistry at Britain’s University of East Anglia who wasn’t involved in the WHO report.

Microplastics might be damaging the environment and stronger measures to reduce plastic waste are needed, he told the AP.

“We know that these types of materials cause stress to small organisms,” Mayes said. “They could be doing a lot of damage in unseen ways.”

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });
WebMD Health

Study: Roundup Linked to Human Liver Damage

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The popular weed killer Roundup might be linked to liver disease, a new study suggests.

A group of patients suffering from liver disease had elevated urine levels of glyphosate, the primary weed-killing ingredient in Roundup, according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD).

“We found those patients who had more severe disease had higher levels of [glyphosate] excretion, which means they had higher levels of exposure, presumably through their diet,” said lead researcher Paul Mills. He is director of UCSD’s Center of Excellence for Research and Training in Integrative Health.

Until now, debate regarding the health effects of glyphosate has largely centered on fears that the chemical causes cancer.

Earlier this month, a California jury awarded $ 2 million to a couple who said long-term exposure to Roundup caused them to develop the same type of cancer — non-Hodgkin lymphoma — four years apart.

That happened days after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a draft conclusion that glyphosate poses “no risks to public health” and “is not likely to be carcinogenic for humans.”

Dr. Kenneth Spaeth is chief of occupational and environmental medicine at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y. He said that the UCSD study findings regarding liver disease raise “a whole other area of potential reason to have concern about this product and its widespread use globally.”

Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the United States, the researchers said. The weed killer was developed and patented by Monsanto in the 1970s, and accounts for about half of the company’s annual revenue.

Monsanto’s parent company, Bayer, issued a statement noting that previous research required to bring the product to market has shown that glyphosate is safe.

“All pesticides, including glyphosate, are tested for their potential to harm liver function in tests that rely on internationally accepted protocols and are conducted according to good laboratory practices,” Bayer said. “All of this testing demonstrates that glyphosate does not harm liver function.”

Mills said he became interested in glyphosate’s potential effects on the liver after studies showing that laboratory rats and mice fed the chemical tended to develop a form of fatty liver disease unrelated to alcohol consumption.

Continued

To see whether the weed killer might be linked to similar disease in humans, Mills and his colleagues examined urine samples from 93 patients who were suspected of having fatty liver disease.

Liver biopsies were taken to determine whether the patients had liver disease and the severity of their condition. Urine samples were taken to determine their exposure to glyphosate.

Glyphosate residue was significantly higher in patients with liver disease than in those with a healthier liver, the investigators found. There also appeared to be a dose-dependent relationship — the more glyphosate in the urine, the worse a person’s liver health.

In their statement, Bayer said: “While we are still examining this recently released study, the data indicates that the researchers failed to consider confounding factors including potential existing metabolic disorders in participants, which would make the results of the study unreliable.”

While the study could not prove cause and effect, the researchers said the findings remained significant even after accounting for age, race/ethnicity, body fat and diabetes status.

Mills said, “Given there are these questions, I’d love for the EPA to say ‘we’re going to take another look at this.'”

Glyphosate might harm the liver in a couple of ways, he suggested.

The chemical might interfere with the liver’s ability to process fats, causing them to accumulate in the organ. Or it might damage genes that regulate fat metabolism in the liver.

Glyphosate is used to improve commercial crop yields by killing weeds that would choke the plants, so much of a person’s exposure to the chemical is likely due to diet, Mills said.

The best way to protect yourself would be to adopt an organic diet, eating only foods that have not been grown with herbicides or pesticides, he explained.

Noting that his study was small, Mills hopes other researchers will follow up with larger-scale efforts to examine effects of glyphosate on the liver.

“I’m hoping some other labs around the country that have either liver centers or other samples available will take a look at this also and see what kind of signal they find,” he said. “That would help move us forward.”

The new study was published online recently in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Paul Mills, Ph.D., director, Center of Excellence for Research and Training in Integrative Health, University of California, San Diego; Kenneth Spaeth, M.D., chief of occupational and environmental medicine, Northwell Health, Great Neck, N.Y.; May 21, 2019, statement from Bayer; April 4, 2019,Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, online

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

Pagination

WebMD Health

Israeli Team Announces First 3D-Printed Heart Using Human Cells

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The world’s first complete 3D printer-generated heart, made using the patient’s own cells and materials, has been created in a lab.

Until now, success has been limited to printing only simple tissues without blood vessels.

“This is the first time anyone anywhere has successfully engineered and printed an entire heart replete with cells, blood vessels, ventricles and chambers,” said team leader Tal Dvir.

The printer-generated heart is only about a third the size of an actual human heart — and it doesn’t actually work. But it’s a groundbreaking step toward engineering customized organs that can be transplanted with less risk of rejection.

“This heart is made from human cells and patient-specific biological materials,” said Dvir, a researcher at the Sagol Center for Regenerative Biotechnology at Tel Aviv University in Israel. “In our process these materials serve as the bio-inks, substances made of sugars and proteins that can be used for 3D printing of complex tissue models.”

Dvir noted that scientists have managed to print a 3D structure of a heart before, but not with cells or blood vessels. “Our results demonstrate the potential of our approach for engineering personalized tissue and organ replacement in the future,” he said in a university news release.

The research was published online April 15 in the journal Advanced Science.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. A transplant is the only treatment available to patients with end-stage heart failure, but there is a severe shortage of heart donors.

That means there’s an urgent need to develop new ways to regenerate a diseased heart, according to the researchers.

The use of biological materials from a patient is key to successful engineering of tissues and organs, Dvir explained. The compatibility of engineered materials is key to eliminating rejection risk.

“Ideally, the biomaterial should possess the same biochemical, mechanical and topographical properties of the patient’s own tissues,” Dvir noted. “Here, we can report a simple approach to 3D-printed thick, vascularized and perfusable cardiac tissues that completely match the immunological, cellular, biochemical and anatomical properties of the patient.”

Continued

While the 3D-printed heart is about the size of a rabbit’s heart, the same technology can be used to print a normal-sized one, he said.

The next step is culturing printed hearts in the lab and “teaching them to behave” like hearts, Dvir added. Then, researchers plan to transplant the 3D-printed heart into lab animals.

“We need to develop the printed heart further,” Dvir said. “The cells need to form a pumping ability; they can currently contract, but we need them to work together. Our hope is that we will succeed and prove our method’s efficacy and usefulness.”

Dvir looks to the future with optimism.

“Maybe, in 10 years, there will be organ printers in the finest hospitals around the world, and these procedures will be conducted routinely,” he said.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: Tel Aviv University, news release, April 15, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

Pagination

WebMD Health

Israeli Team Announces First 3D-Printed Heart Using Human Cells

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 — The world’s first complete 3D printer-generated heart, made using the patient’s own cells and materials, has been created in a lab.

Until now, success has been limited to printing only simple tissues without blood vessels.

“This is the first time anyone anywhere has successfully engineered and printed an entire heart replete with cells, blood vessels, ventricles and chambers,” said team leader Tal Dvir.

The printer-generated heart is only about a third the size of an actual human heart — and it doesn’t actually work. But it’s a groundbreaking step toward engineering customized organs that can be transplanted with less risk of rejection.

“This heart is made from human cells and patient-specific biological materials,” said Dvir, a researcher at the Sagol Center for Regenerative Biotechnology at Tel Aviv University in Israel. “In our process these materials serve as the bio-inks, substances made of sugars and proteins that can be used for 3D printing of complex tissue models.”

Dvir noted that scientists have managed to print a 3D structure of a heart before, but not with cells or blood vessels. “Our results demonstrate the potential of our approach for engineering personalized tissue and organ replacement in the future,” he said in a university news release.

The research was published online April 15 in the journal Advanced Science.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. A transplant is the only treatment available to patients with end-stage heart failure, but there is a severe shortage of heart donors.

That means there’s an urgent need to develop new ways to regenerate a diseased heart, according to the researchers.

The use of biological materials from a patient is key to successful engineering of tissues and organs, Dvir explained. The compatibility of engineered materials is key to eliminating rejection risk.

“Ideally, the biomaterial should possess the same biochemical, mechanical and topographical properties of the patient’s own tissues,” Dvir noted. “Here, we can report a simple approach to 3D-printed thick, vascularized and perfusable cardiac tissues that completely match the immunological, cellular, biochemical and anatomical properties of the patient.”

While the 3D-printed heart is about the size of a rabbit’s heart, the same technology can be used to print a normal-sized one, he said.

The next step is culturing printed hearts in the lab and “teaching them to behave” like hearts, Dvir added. Then, researchers plan to transplant the 3D-printed heart into lab animals.

“We need to develop the printed heart further,” Dvir said. “The cells need to form a pumping ability; they can currently contract, but we need them to work together. Our hope is that we will succeed and prove our method’s efficacy and usefulness.”

Dvir looks to the future with optimism.

“Maybe, in 10 years, there will be organ printers in the finest hospitals around the world, and these procedures will be conducted routinely,” he said.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more on heart failure.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: April 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Human Ancestors’ Diet Led You to Pronounce Your F’s and V’s

FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 — Think of it as another example of a refined palate.

The ability to make speech sounds such as “f” and “v” is due to diet-led changes in humans’ bite, researchers say.

The range of speech sounds people can make was generally thought to be fixed since modern humans appeared about 300,000 years ago, but this new study challenges that theory.

The findings suggest that sounds such as “f” and “v” — common in many modern languages — are a relatively recent development linked to humans’ eating habits.

The teeth of adult humans used to meet in an edge-to-edge bite in order to cope with harder and tougher foods.

As softer foods became available, the overbite that had previously disappeared by adulthood remained, with upper teeth slightly in front of lower teeth, the researchers explained.

This enabled the emergence of a new class of speech sounds called labiodentals, now used in half of the world’s languages. These sounds are made by touching the lower lip to the upper teeth, as when pronouncing the letter “f.”

“In Europe, our data suggests that the use of labiodentals has increased dramatically only in the last couple of millennia, correlated with the rise of food processing technology such as industrial milling,” said study co-first author Steven Moran, a linguist at the University of Zurich in Switzerland.

“The influence of biological conditions on the development of sounds has so far been underestimated,” he added in a university news release.

Moran’s team based its conclusion on insights, data and methods from multiple branches of science, including biological anthropology, phonetics and historical linguistics.

According to project leader Balthasar Bickel, the study results “shed light on complex causal links between cultural practices, human biology and language.” Bickel is a professor of comparative linguistics at the university.

“They also challenge the common assumption that, when it comes to language, the past sounds just like the present,” he said in the news release.

The findings and the new methods used to conduct the study could help linguists answer a number of unsolved questions, including how languages actually sounded thousands of years ago.

More information

Learn about the origins of the English language at Merriam-Webster.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: March 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Does This Salamander Hold the Key to Regrowing Human Body Parts?