Menu

California Sues Juul for Targeting Teens

Juul, the top-selling maker of e-cigarettes in the United States, is being sued by California for allegedly targeting teens with it early marketing campaigns.

The lawsuit, filed Monday, also alleges that Juul’s website didn’t previously adequately verify customers’ ages, the Associated Press reported.

This is just one of many legal battles for Juul. It’s the focus of numerous state and federal investigations into whether its early marketing campaigns helped trigger the teen vaping crisis in the United States.

Juul denies that it marketed to teens and notes that it’s stopped advertising and taken most of its flavors off the market, the AP reported.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });
WebMD Health

Juul Delivers More Nicotine Than Other E-Cigarettes: Study

By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Nov. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Juul electronic cigarettes deliver nicotine at a much higher rate than most other types of e-cigarettes, new research shows.

Juul is by far the leading e-cigarette brand sold in the United States, and is particularly popular among youth.

In the new study, researchers from Penn State University College of Medicine analyzed blood samples from six Juul users who were asked to puff on their device every 20 seconds for 10 minutes — a total of 30 puffs.

“The Juul users we studied obtained blood nicotine concentrations almost three times as high as most of the e-cigarette users we previously studied,” said study first author Jessica Yingst, a research project manager.

In fact, “Juul’s nicotine delivery is very similar to that of cigarettes,” she said in a university news release.

The Juul users were also asked to rate their withdrawal symptoms and other effects like nicotine craving and anxiety both before and after vaping. They had higher levels of nicotine dependence than more than 3,000 long-term users of other e-cigarettes, according to the study.

Juul Labs did not respond to a request for comment from HealthDay.

Prior studies of other e-cigarette brands with high liquid nicotine concentrations found that many delivered very little nicotine to the user, the researchers noted.

“In previous studies, we found that e-cigarette users were less addicted than smokers. However, the high nicotine delivery of the product and the scores on this study suggest that Juul is probably as addictive as cigarettes,” said study co-author Jonathan Foulds, a professor of public health sciences.

The researchers said the high addiction potential of Juul e-cigarettes is a good reason for nonsmokers to avoid them, but they may still offer smokers a less harmful form of nicotine consumption.

“In previous work, we determined that Juul delivered lower levels of some harmful chemicals than cigarettes and even some other e-cigarettes,” said study co-author John Richie, a professor of public health sciences.

E-cigarettes pose a dilemma for public health experts, according to Foulds.

Continued

“This type of product is likely addictive and is attractive to teenagers,” he said. “But those same qualities that make it addictive may enable it to help adult smokers switch to a much less harmful form of nicotine consumption.”

In recent weeks, Juul has announced that it would no longer sell mint, fruit or dessert flavors of its products.

The company made these moves as it faces widespread criticism that its flavored nicotine products are hooking a generation of teenagers on nicotine and vaping.

The company also faces multiple investigations by U.S. Congress, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and several state attorneys general. Juul is also being sued by adults and underage vapers who allege they became addicted to nicotine by using Juul’s products.

The study was published Nov. 15 in the journal JAMA Open Network.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: Penn State University, news release, Nov. 15, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

Pagination

WebMD Health

Juul Shipped Tainted Products, Lawsuit Alleges

Nearly one million tainted nicotine pods were knowingly distributed by e-cigarette maker Juul Labs, a former company finance executive claims in a lawsuit.

Another allegation in the lawsuit filed Tuesday by lawyers for Siddharth Breja is that Juul did not list expiration dates on its products, the Associated Press reported.

Juul — the best-selling e-cigarette brand in the U.S. — fired Breja earlier this year. The suit claims that Breja was terminated after opposing company practices.

The claims against Juul are “baseless” and Breja was fired because he failed to “demonstrate the leadership qualities” required for the job, a company spokesman said in a statement, the AP reported.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });
WebMD Health

Juul Halts Sale of Fruit, Dessert Vape Flavors

By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Juul, which makes the top-selling brand of electronic-cigarettes in the United States, said Thursday it will no longer sell fruit or dessert flavors of its products.

The company’s decision comes as it faces widespread criticism that its flavored nicotine products are hooking a generation of teenagers on nicotine and vaping, the Associated Press reported Thursday.

The company faces multiple investigations by Congress, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and several state attorneys general. Juul is also being sued by adults and underage vapers who allege they became addicted to nicotine by using Juul’s products, the wire service said.

The Trump administration has also proposed banning nearly all e-cigarette flavors.

The flavors dropped by Juul will be mango, creme, fruit and cucumber, which account for 10% of its sales. The company will continue to sell its most popular flavors: mint and menthol, the AP reported.

Juul’s decision to continue selling mint and menthol shows “it isn’t serious about preventing youth use,” said Matthew Myers, from the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

“Juul knows that 64% of high school e-cigarette users now use mint or menthol flavors, and this number is growing all the time,” Myers said in a statement.

His group and others say the Trump administration should ban all vaping flavors except tobacco, the AP added.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday that the number of severe lung illnesses continues to climb: There are now 1,479 cases reported in 49 states. Seventy-eight percent of those cases involved products that contained THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. Seventy percent of these patients were male, and 79 percent were under the age of 35.

The death toll also went up, hitting 33 deaths in 24 states. The median age of patients who have died is 44, the CDC added.

Products containing the marijuana chemical THC seem to be a main driver behind the illnesses.

While THC is a main suspect in the CDC’s investigation, a recent study suggested other chemicals might play a role.

Continued

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic Arizona conducted an examination of 17 cases involving vaping-linked lung injury — including lung biopsies. All of the patients examined had severe forms of the illness, and two had died.

“Based on what we have seen in our study, we suspect that most cases involve chemical contaminants, toxic byproducts or other noxious agents within vape liquids,” said lead researcher Dr. Brandon Larsen. He’s a surgical pathologist at the Mayo Clinic Arizona, in Scottsdale.

Those findings were published Oct. 2 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

While THC does seem to figure prominently in many cases, Dr. Anne Schuchat, principal deputy director of the CDC, has stressed that nicotine-containing vaping products without THC cannot be ruled out as a potential cause of harm. Because of that, the CDC recommendation for everyone to stop vaping stands.

What is clear is that the illnesses that are affecting vapers can be sudden and severe. Symptoms include cough, shortness of breath and chest pains. Some patients have had so much trouble breathing that they wind up on oxygen, and in extreme cases are placed on a mechanical ventilator.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release,  Oct. 17, 2019;  Oct. 3, 2019 media briefing with: Anne Schuchat, M.D., principal deputy director, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;Associated Press; Oct. 17, 2019, statement, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

Pagination

WebMD Health

Juul Halts Funding For Vaping Ballot Initiative

Oct. 1, 2019 — On Monday, San Francisco-based Juul Labs Inc. said it will no longer fund an effort to quash an anti-vaping law in the city, effectively ending the campaign.

Juul, the largest maker of e-cigarettes, is ending support for the measure after giving nearly $ 19 million, according to the Associated Press.

Juul’s decision follows closely on major changes at the company, including replacing its CEO.

The proposition, however, will still be on the ballot in November.

The law, called proposition C would permit the sale of vaping products to adults. If it passes, it would override a law passed in June banning the sale of any e-cigarette that has not been reviewed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

“This could very well be yet another of a series of lies and exaggerations from Juul and Big Tobacco,” Larry Tramutola, who directs the No on Prop C campaign said in a statement.

“Until they return the $ 7 million unspent dollars that is in their political account, until they suspend their mail, their advertising, their paid phone calls and lay off their consultants, we do not believe them,” he said.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });
WebMD Health

Nearly Half of Juul Twitter Followers Are Teens, Young Adults: Study

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 — Juul became the dominant brand of e-cigarettes in the United States by targeting teens with its clever use of social media, a new study suggests.

Nearly 70% of U.S. e-cigarette sales are Juul products, and most vapers are teens and young adults. The study determined that nearly half of Juul’s Twitter followers are under age 18, with the majority of followers 24 and under.

“The rise of e-cigarettes and the lack of regulation around marketing with its appeal to youth is now addicting a whole generation of youth on nicotine,” said lead researcher Annice Kim of the Center for Health Policy Science and Tobacco Research in Research Triangle Park, N.C., who noted that nicotine is not healthy for developing brains.

She said Juul’s initial marketing aimed to corral a group of influencers on Twitter and other platforms to push its flavored vaping system to teens and young adults. More needs to be done, Kim added, to limit exposure of age-restricted products to underage youth.

Juul said in a statement that it voluntarily shut down its Facebook and Instagram accounts last year. Its Twitter account no longer contains promotional material, the statement added, only such information as study results, executive hires and the company’s support for policies to reduce youth access to tobacco products.

“We don’t want youth using our product,” the company said. “As a result, we share the researchers’ stated interest in restricting underage engagement with our limited social-media activities.”

Kim said Juul’s previous social media marketing has had an effect.

For the study, her team collected data on people who followed Juul on Twitter. Of nearly 10,000 individual Twitter followers, researchers estimated that 45% were 13- to 17-year-olds and 44% were 18- to 24-year-olds. Under 12% were 21 or older.

In its statement, Juul questioned the study’s methodology. It said the findings differ “significantly from data Twitter made available to us,” which show that 13- to 17-year-olds made up 3.9% of the company’s followers on the platform in May 2018.

But Vince Willmore, a spokesman for the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, said the study is further evidence that Juul’s social media marketing helped fuel the youth e-cigarette epidemic. He said the company did too little, too late to stop it.

“Young customers continue to do the marketing for them through their social media posts,” Willmore said.

He called on social media platforms to prohibit marketing of all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, and for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to develop regulations to prevent their marketing on social media to young people.

Meanwhile, Stanton Glantz, director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, said e-cigarette makers have responded to the marketing backlash by targeting adults. Unfortunately, he added, they have already gotten their youth message across.

“It’s like they set a forest fire, they don’t need to keep going around lighting trees,” Glantz said. “They’re continuing to addict kids — without fingerprints.”

Glantz called on the FDA to make Juul and other e-cigarette makers to submit the products for approval. The FDA has said it will begin enforcing the requirement in 2022, but a federal court in Maryland last week told the agency to start now. Experts expect that ruling to be appealed.

Rather than waiting for the FDA to act, some states and cities are already restricting sale and marketing of e-cigarettes to kids, he said.

The report was published online May 20 as a letter in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

More information

The Center on Addiction has more about e-cigarettes.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: May 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Juul Withdraws Most Flavored E-Cigs From Market

By E.J. Mundell

HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Juul Labs, which commands 70 percent of the U.S. e-cigarette market, announced Tuesday that it would cease selling most flavored versions of its popular vaping pods in retail stores.

The company said it would also terminate its social media productions related to the flavored products.

The announcement comes after increasing pressure from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other critics, alarmed by the surging popularity among the young of the addictive, nicotine-laden devices.

Earlier in November, media reports suggested that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration would soon ban sales of most flavored electronic cigarettes in retail stores and gas stations across the United States. That plan was expected to be announced later this week, The New York Times reported.

Juul’s move on Tuesday appears to pre-empt that. It comes after the FDA conducted a raid on its headquarters in October, seeking documents suggesting the company aimed marketing directing at the young. Some states have initiated similar investigations, the Times said.

Kevin Burns is chief executive of San Francisco-based Juul. In a statement sent to media he said that, “Our intent was never to have youth use Juul. But intent is not enough. The numbers are what matter and the numbers tell us underage use of e-cigarettes is a problem.”

Juul is not ceasing sale of all flavored products: According to the Times, the company is stopping retail orders for mango, fruit, creme and cucumber flavors, but not menthol, mint and tobacco flavors. Those products would still be sold at retail outlets that have invested in age-verification technology, Juul said.

The company said it was shutting down Facebook and Instagram accounts in the United States that promoted the use of the flavored devices.

The FDA has long sought to reduce teens‘ use of flavored e-cigarettes, thought to be especially alluring to young people who then become hooked on nicotine. The agency was also pressing for age-verification measures for online sales to prevent minors from buying the flavor pods.

Continued

Juul came under special scrutiny because the devices are easily used surreptitiously by teens. The pods resemble small computer flash drives, so students were using them in class as soon as teachers’ backs were turned.

There were real health concerns tied to the products, however.

“I think that there’s a perception that e-cigarettes are a safer alternative for kids,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said in a recent interview with the Times. “But it can lead to a lifelong addiction, and some percentage will migrate to combustible products.”

So, “in order to close the on ramp to e-cigarettes for kids, we have to put in place some speed bumps for adults,” Gottlieb said, referring to efforts such as the proposed ban.

The FDA first began its crackdown on flavored e-cigarettes earlier this year, as the number of teens using the products reached epidemic proportions. Use of Juul and other vaping devices has skyrocketed among teens over the past year, with more than 3 million middle and high school students now thought to use the products, according to unpublished government data.

Flavored versions of e-cigarettes — including chicken and waffles, rocket Popsicle and “unicorn milk” — have boosted sales among the young even further, experts contend.

“The availability of flavors in e-cigarettes is one of the top reasons that middle and high school students cite as their motivation for using e-cigarettes,” said Patricia Folan, director of the Center for Tobacco Control at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y. “Young people are more likely to try flavored e-cigarettes and consider them less harmful than tobacco-flavored e-cigarettes.”

Responding to the trend, the FDA recently warned several e-cigarette makers to stop marketing to teenagers or risk being banned. Major companies were given 60 days to prove they could keep their devices away from minors, and the deadline is this weekend. Companies involved include Juul, RJR Vapor Co.’s Vuse, Imperial Brands’ blu and devices made by Logic.

The FDA also warned 1,100 retailers to stop selling e-cigarettes to minors and fined some of them, the Times reported.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


WebMD Health

Many Young Juul Users May Not Know They’re Addicted