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You’ve Lost the Weight — Now Keep It Off to Keep Diabetes at Bay

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The health of people with type 2 diabetes often improves dramatically with a 5% to 10% weight loss — but to sustain the benefits, you need to keep the weight off, new research claims.

After losing weight with a yearlong intervention, blood sugar and blood pressure levels go down and cholesterol results improve. People who kept at least 75% of that weight off for another three years retained or had even greater health benefits, the study reported.

“A lot of times, the emphasis is put on weight-loss programs, but it’s just as critical to help people maintain their weight loss,” said study senior author Alice Lichtenstein. She’s director of the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at Tufts University’s Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging in Boston.

“People tend to think of diets as short-term, but it’s really something that has to be lifelong. If you’ve found a successful way to lose weight, don’t revert to old habits. Figure out how to incorporate the changes you made to lose weight,” Lichtenstein suggested.

Excess weight is a major risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. Studies have shown that losing weight can improve the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. And shedding around 10% of your body weight may even put the disease into remission, a recent study from Diabetic Medicine found.

The current study — published Oct. 9 in the Journal of the American Heart Association — included more than 1,500 people with type 2 diabetes who were recruited for an intensive lifestyle intervention that lasted one year.

After losing weight, participants entered a three-year maintenance phase that included monthly group meetings. They were encouraged to get regular physical activity and to use a single meal replacement product each day.

Lichtenstein and her team looked at blood pressure and levels of blood sugar, triglycerides (a type of blood fat linked to heart disease), and HDL (or “good”) cholesterol. They checked just after the weight loss and again after three years of maintenance.

The researchers tried to find the specific point where people started to lose the benefits of weight reduction, but couldn’t find one. But they did find that when people who lost 10% or more of their initial weight regained about one-quarter of the lost pounds, the health benefits began to wane.

Continued

“The more weight loss that is maintained, the better people will be in terms of [heart and metabolic] health. There’s a long-term benefit from maintaining weight loss,” Lichtenstein said.

Dr. Berhane Seyoum, chief of endocrinology at Detroit Medical Center, reviewed the study and said keeping weight off is no easy feat.

“Maintaining weight loss is the most difficult part as the body tries to bring back the weight that has been lost. Weight loss and maintenance is a lifetime struggle. You have to watch what you’re eating and exercise,” he said.

For type 2 diabetes patients who struggle with hunger, medications can help keep hunger at bay, Seyoum said.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Alice Lichtenstein, D.Sc., lab director and senior scientist, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, and professor, nutrition science and policy, Tufts University, Boston; Berhane Seyoum, M.D., M.P.H., chief, endocrinology, Detroit Medical Center and Wayne State University, Detroit; Oct. 9, 2019,Journal of the American Heart Association

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Pagination

WebMD Health

First Look: Xilam’s Acclaimed Annecy Movie ‘I Lost My Body’

It’s not every day that an auteur-driven, animated feature about the adventures of a dismembered hand makes it to the big screen. But then again, French animator Jérémy Clapin’s new feature I Lost My Body (J’ai perdu mon corps) is not your average, everyday kind of a movie. The beautifully mounted arthouse movie premiered as part of the very selective Critics’ Week sidebar at the Cannes Festival last month, and made a big splash at the Annecy Festival this week as well.

The unusual 2D pic is produced by veteran animation figure Marc Du Pontavice, the man behind thriving French toon studio Xilam and internationally popular titles such as Oggy and the Cockroaches, Les Daltons, Zig and Sharko and Go West: A Lucky Luke Adventure. This marks the first feature film directing job for Clapin, who is best known for his acclaimed shorts Skhizein (2008), Backbone Tale (2004) and Palmpideraium (2012).

Based on the 2006 novel Happy Hand by Guillaume Laurent (author of Amelie and A Very Long Engagement), the film centers on a cut-off hand that escapes from a dissection lab in order to be reunited with its body. As it scrambles through the pitfalls of Paris, it remembers its life with Naoufel (voiced by Hakim Faris), the young man it was once attached to, until he meets Gabrielle (Victoire Du Bois), the young woman who steals his heart.

A Strange, Engrossing Tale

“It was the weirdest possible pitch, but I was very attracted to the story and bought the book rights, because I felt that only animation could really tell this story in the right way,” says Du Pontavice, during a recent interview in Cannes. “One of the most interesting challenges for us was how to create empathy for a character that has no eyes, no mouth, no face. Thanks to the miracle of animation, we are able to really feel for this cut-off hand and be interested in its quest to find its body. It has this mission to bring its owner Naoufel together with his lost love.”

After spending about 18 months working on the script, Clapin and Julien Bisaro (Bang Bang) storyboarded the entire movie. The bulk of the animation was done at Xilam’s studios in Paris and Lyon, using the open-source software Blender, and part of the CG animation was produced on the French isle of Réunion in the Indian Ocean. “It gives the movie a very distinctive look,” says Du Pontavice. “I believe it’s the first feature film made entirely with Blender. I can definitely seeing more people using it in the future.”

The film’s art direction is described as realistic and colorful, quite different from Clapin’s surreal and stylized approach in this shorts.. “It’s an interesting mix of 2D and CG techniques,” adds the producer. “We downgraded 3D with 12 images per second to avoid straight photorealism. Blender is a free software that adapts itself to the different needs of the artists.”

Director Jérémy Clapin adds, “Using 3D not only helped us create a tangible world, but also gave the animation a realistic look so we could avoid the trap of a classic 2D style. Employing Blender specifically was essential because of the ‘Grease Pencil’ which is a powerful drawing and 2D animation tool.”

Clapin mentions that the visual style of the movie sits midway between drawing and cinema. ”It’s both rough, pictorial and sophisticated. What would I like audiences to take away from the movie?” He asks. “I’d like them to look at their hand in a different way!” In other words, the movie will definitely reach out and touch audiences!

You can learn more at xilam.com/media/jpmc/

“One of the most interesting challenges for us was how to create empathy for a character that has no eyes, no mouth, no face.”
Producer Marc Du Pontavice

I Lost My Body

I Lost My Body

I Lost My Body

I Lost My Body

Jérémy Clapin and Marc Du Pontavice

Jérémy Clapin and Marc Du Pontavice

Animation Magazine

‘I Lost My Body,’ ‘Memorable’ Take Home Major Prizes at Annecy

Saturday night’s well-attended awards ceremony wrapped up the hugely successful 2019 edition of the Annecy Intl. Animation Festival and MIFA market. Jeremy Clapin’s I Lost My Body, Bruno Collet’s Mémorable and Regina Pessoa’s Tio Tomas were three of the big prize winners this year, and all shared haunting visuals, poetic tone and auteur-driven stylized approaches to the medium.

“It is wonderful to observe the alliances between the official juries, audience votes and the junior juries,” said the festival’s artistic director Marcel Jean. “Aesthetically powerful and unique propositions, such as I Lost My Body, Mémorable and Daughter have something to please everyone, from professionals, adolescents and the public alike.”

The festival’s 43rd edition posted a record number of attendees, 12,300 badge-holders (up from 11,700 badge-holders in 2018).

Here is the complete list of the 2019 winners:

Cristal for a Feature Film: I Lost My Body (J’ai perdu mon corps) by Jeremy Clapin (France, Xilam Animation)

Jury Distinction: Bunuel in the Labyrinth of the Turtles by Salvador Simo (Netherlands/Spain, Sygnatia Films, Submarine)

Audience Award/Premiere: I Lost My Body (Jeremy Clapin, France, Xilam)

Contrechamp Award: Away by Gints Zilbalodis (Latvia, Bilibaba)

Cristal for a Short Film: Mémorable by Bruno Collet (France, Vivement Lundi!)

Jury Award: Uncle Thomas: Accounting for the Days (Tio Tomas) by Regina Pessoa (Canada, France, Portugal; ONF, Les Armateurs, Ciclope Films)

Jean-Lux Xiberras Award for a First Film: Deszcz (La Pluie) by Piotr Milczarek (Poland, Fumi)

Jury Distinction for Powerful Storytelling: Pulsion (Drive) by Pedro Casavecchia (Argentina, France, Atlas V)

Jury Distinction for Social Significance: My Generation by Ludovic Houplain (France, H5)

Audience Award: Mémorable by Bruno Collet (France, Vivement Lundi!)

Off-Limits Award: Don’t Know What by Thomas Renoldner (Austria)

Cristal for a TV Production: Panic in the Village “The County Fair” by Vincent Patar, Stephane Aubier (Belgium Autour de Minuit, Paniquesprl, Beast Animation)

Jury Award for a TV Series: Flavors of Iraq “Le Cowboy de Fallujah” by Leonard Cohen (France, Nova Production)

Jury Award for a TV Series: La Vie de Chateau (My Life in Versailles) by Clarence Madeleine-Perdrillat, Nathaniel h’Limi (France)

Cristal for a Commissioned Film: Ted-Ed “Accents” by Robertino Zambrano (Australia, USA, Kapa Studioworks, Ted-Ed)

Jury Award: #takeonhistory “Wimbledon” by Smith & Foulkes (U.K., Nexus Studio)

Cristal for a Graduation Film: Dcera (Daughter) by Daria Kashcheeva (Czech Republic, Famu, Maur Film Co.)

Jury Award: Rules of Play by Merlin Flugel (German)

Jury Distinction Prize: These Things in My Head-Side A by Luke Bourne (U.K., Birmingham City University)

Cristal for Best VR Work: Gloomy Eyes by Jorge Tereso, Fernando Maldonado (Argentina, France, Atlas V, 3Dar, Arte France)

For more info, visit www.annecy.org

Memorable

Memorable

Tio Tomas

Tio Tomas

Annecy 2019

Annecy 2019

Annecy 2019

Annecy 2019

Animation Magazine

Netflix Picks Up Cannes Awardees ‘I Lost My Body,’ ‘Atlantics’

Netflix has acquired streaming rights to two stand-out features which made a splash at the Cannes Film Festival: Jérémy Clapin’s feature film debut I Lost My Body (Xilam Animation), winner of Nespresso Grand Prize of Cannes Critics’ Week and the program’s only animated contender; and live-action drama Atlantics, the Grand Prix-winning feature directorial debut of French-Senegalese filmmaker Mati Diop — the first Black woman director to win an award at Cannes in the festival’s 72-year history.

The streamer has picked up worldwide rights (excluding China, Benelux, Turkey and France) to I Lost My Body, which Clapin (Skhizein) directed and wrote with the original book’s author Guillaum Laurant (Amelie, A Very Long Engagement); Xilam’s Marc du Pontaviee produced this much-lauded project, which follows an amputated hand which escapes from a dissection lab to search for its lost body. As it scrambles through the pitfalls of Paris, it remembers its life with the young man it was once attached to … until they met Gabrielle. The voice cast is led by Hakim Faris, Victoire Du Bois and Patrick d’Assumçao.

Netflix has also acquired worldwide rights (excluding China, Benelux, Switzerland, Russia and France) to Atlantics, directed by Diop (A Thousand Suns) who also wrote the script with Olivier Demangel. The film is executive produced by Les Film Du Bal (France), Judith Lou Lévy and Eve Robin, in co-production with Cinekap (Senegal) and Oumar Sall, and Frakas Productions (Belgium), Jean-Yves Roubin and Cassandre Warnauts.

Synopsis: Along the Atlantic coast, a soon-to-be-inaugurated futuristic tower looms over a suburb of Dakar. Ada, 17, is in love with Souleiman, a young construction worker. But she has been promised to another man. One night, Souleiman and his co-workers leave the country by sea, in hopes of a better future. Several days later, a fire ruins Ada’s wedding and a mysterious fever starts to spread. Little does Ada know that Souleiman has returned. Stars Mama Sané, Amadou Mbow, Ibrahima Traoré, Nicole Sougou, Amina Kane, Mariama Gassama, Coumba Dieng, Ibrahima Mbaye and Diankou Sembene.

Animation Magazine

Teaser: ‘I Lost My Body’ Screening at Cannes Critics’ Week

With the announcement of the Cannes Film Festival Critics’ Week selections, Jérémy Clapin’s feature directorial debut I Lost My Body (J’ai perdu mon corps) will premiere as the lone bastion of animation in the selective sidebar. Produced by Marc du Pontavice at acclaimed French studio Xilam Animation, the adaptation of Guillaum Laurant’s Happy Hand generated a lot of buzz at Cartoon Movie earlier this spring.

Clapin previously made the Critics’ Week list with his César-nominated short Skhizein (2008), which won the Cannes Discovery Award as well as the Annecy Audience Award, Best French Animation at Clermont-Ferrand, and Best Animated Short honors from Chicago Int’l Film Festival, Los Angeles Film Festival and Hiroshima Animation Festival. He is also the director of lauded shorts Palmipedarium (2012) and his first film Backbone Tale (2004).

Synopsis: A cut-off hand escapes from a dissection lab with one crucial goal: to get back to its body. As it scrambles through the pitfalls of Paris, it remembers its life with the young man it was once attached to… until they met Gabrielle.

The screenplay is by Jérémy Clapin and Guillaume Laurant. The voice cast is led by Hakim Faris, Victoire Du Bois and Patrick D’Assumçao. Dan Levy composed the music.

I Lost My Body was co-produced by Rhone-Alpes Cinema; Charade is handling international sales.

I've Lost My Body

I’ve Lost My Body

I've Lost My Body

I’ve Lost My Body

I've Lost My Body

I’ve Lost My Body

Animation Magazine

Another Cost of the Opioid Epidemic: Billions of Dollars in Lost Taxes

TUESDAY, April 16, 2019 — Opioid abuse-related job losses have cost U.S. federal and state governments tens of billions of dollars in lost tax revenue, a new study claims.

Penn State researchers analyzed data from the U.S. National Survey on Drug Use and Health along with estimates of declines in the U.S. labor force due to the opioid epidemic.

Between 2000 and 2016, federal tax losses due to opioid-related reductions in the labor force totaled $ 26 billion, researchers estimated. State governments lost an estimated $ 11.8 billion in tax revenue over that period.

The federal hit was entirely due to lost income tax revenue, while states also lost sales tax revenue, according to the study.

Pennsylvania was among states taking the biggest hit — a $ 638.2 million tax revenue loss.

“This is a cost that was maybe not thought about as explicitly before, and a cost that governments could potentially try to recoup,” said Joel Segel, an assistant professor of health policy and administration at Penn State.

“Instead of focusing on the cost of treating people with opioid use disorder, you could think about it in terms of a potential benefit to getting people healthy, back on their feet, and back in the workforce,” he added in a university news release.

In 2016, nearly 2.1 million Americans had an opioid use disorder, and about 64,000 died of opioid overdoses, previous research has found.

Segel noted those studies have focused on substance abuse treatment and other medical costs associated with the epidemic.

These new findings help show the value of treating people with opioid addiction and should be considered when treatment programs are being evaluated, according to Segel.

“Not only are treatment programs beneficial to the individual and to society, but if you’re thinking about the total cost of these treatment programs, future earnings from tax revenue could help offset a piece of that,” he said.

The study was recently published in the journal Medical Care.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on opioids.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: April 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

News Bytes: Disney-Fox Merger Closing, Lost ‘Doctor Who’ Gets Animated & More

WATCH: Blockhead “Slippery Slope” feat. billy woods, Open Mike Eagle & Breezly Brewin
10 years since the last music video from hip hop producer Blockhead, this lone artist claymation effort is a painstakingly crafted sci-fi complement to the track off his latest album, Free Sweatpants. The slim-to-none budget piece was created in a very old school vein: animated on 24fps, with no greenscreens. See more at Mr. Oz’s YouTube channel and on Instagram @claytoi.

LOBO Visualized “Bad Ideas” in CCR Driving PSA
Latin American highway concession operator CCR teamed up with agency Heads and global creative studio LOBO for a new driving safety PSA with light-hearted animations, casting “bad ideas” behind the wheel as mischievous monsters with their own unique personalities. Alton directed the film and designed nine creatures, each representing a dangerous driving habit: “Doze-Off” lumbers to a standstill in a daze, “Drunkaroni” thinks leaving the bar buzzed is a great idea, “Light-Killer” couldn’t care less about regular tune-ups, and many more. Amidst the chaos, a hero arose: “Responsa,” a fuzzy creature with a responsible attitude who stands for safer traffic for all.

CCR_60s_Bad_ideas from Lobo on Vimeo.

‘Gigantosaurus’ Launches on Disney Junior
Cyber Group Studios’ new preschool series has made the big move to Disney Junior as of Friday, March 15 at 7:35 p.m., following its debut earlier this year on Disney Channel. The exciting everyday adventures of Rocky, Bill, Tiny and Mazu will air on its new home at 10 a.m. on weekends and 5:30 p.m. & 8:30 p.m. on weekdays. The quest for the Gigantosaurus continues on Disney Channel at 9 a.m. weekdays, with new episodes each Friday.

Missing ‘Doctor Who’ Episodes Brought Back to Life with Animation
Originally broadcast in 1967, four-part adventure “The Macra Terror” — in which the second Time Lord Patrick Troughton contends against a race of giant crab creatures — were recreated from fan audio recordings and will be released on DVD and Blu-ray on March 25 by BBC Studios.

Disney, Fox Merger Set to Close March 20
Disney has received the final sign-off from Mexican regulators this week, and is set to seal the $ 71.3 billion acquisition at the end of the month. The Mouse House will pick up the 21st Century Fox studio, a controlling stake in Hulu, channels such as FX and more. Former Warner Bros. exec Craig Hunegs will lead the restructure of Disney Television Studios.

Dr. Who

Doctor Who

Animation Magazine

In Memoriam: Animation & VFX Greats We Lost in 2018

This year, we said goodbye to many talented men and women who made the world a better place by working on some of our favorite shorts, TV shows and movies throughout the years. We honor their memory on these pages and thank them for leaving us with so many great moments. A big thanks to Tom Sito, who produces an Animation Afternoon of Remembrance each year to celebrate and honor the lives of those who gave so much to our community and the world at large. This year, the event will be held on Saturday, Feb. 8 at noon at the 839 Guild Hall in Burbank.

Gerard Baldwin

Gerard Baldwin

Gerard Baldwin. Prolific writer, producer and educator, who earned five Daytime Emmy nominations for The Smurfs series and various Smurfs specials. Other TV directing credits include Rocky and His Friends, Linus! The Lionhearted, George of the Jungle, Tiny Toon Adventures, Quick Draw McGraw, The Huckleberry Hound Show, The Jetsons, Muppet Babies, Aladdin and Rugrats. Died April 18, age 89.

Adam Burke. Animator who worked at Bluth, Blue Sky, Warner Bros, Disney and Pixar whose credits include Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron, The Iron Giant, The Incredibles movies, Cars 2 ,Toy Story 3, Up and WALL·E. Died Oct. 7, age 47.

Frank Buxton

Frank Buxton

Frank Buxton. Writer, actor, producer and director. Best known for voicing Hal Seeger’s popular animated hero Batfink and his archenemy Hugo A-Go-Go. Also wrote and directed live-action shows such as The Odd Couple, Happy Days and Mork & Mindy, and wrote, produced and directed Hot Dog. Voice credits include stints of Chip ‘n’ Dale Rescue Rangers, Garfield and Friends, All-New Dennis the Menace and The Garfield Show. Died Jan. 2, age 87.

Joe Clokey. Producer and caretaker of the Gumby empire created by his father, the late Art Clokey. Affectionately known as “Gumby’s Little Brother,” Joe served as president of Premavision/Clokey Productions, the company behind TV shows featuring Gumby, Pokey and Davey & Goliath. Died March 2, age 56.

Fred Crippen

Fred Crippen

Fred Crippen. Creator of Roger Ramjet, founder of Pantomime Pictures and animator at UPA. Worked on numerous shows as designer, timing director, including Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Men in Black: The Series, Extreme Ghostbusters and Godzilla: The Series. Died March 22, age 90.

Steve Ditko. Iconic comic-book artist and co-creator with Stan Lee of characters such as Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. He also created Squirrel Girl, Mr. A, Captain Atom and Question. Died June 29, age 90.

Edward Faigin. Animator and voice actor who worked at Hanna-Barbera and Warner Bros. credits include Rover Dangerfield, Daffy Duck’s Quackbusters, The Night of the Living Duck and The Looney, Looney, Looney Bugs Bunny Movie. Died March 6, Age 95.

Ray Favata. New York-based animator and layout artist, whose credits include The Great Space Coaster, Doug, The Tale of Peter Rabbit and Beginners Bible: The Story of Easter. Died Oct. 20, age 94.

Pablo Ferro. Legendary Cuban-born graphic designer, who created the seminal titles for classics such as Dr. Strangelove, Bullitt and Men In Black. Died Nov. 18, age 83.

Marcia Fertig. Animator at Disney, Hanna-Barbera, Warner Bros, Ruby-Spears and Filmation. Her credits include The Fox and the Hound, Godzilla, He-Man and She-Ra. Died Jan. 31, age 98.

Peter Firmin. Innovative British designer, illustrator and animator who co-founded Smallfilms and co-created popular children’s TV shows Ivor the Engine, Bagpuss and The Clangers. Died July 1, age 89.

Audrey Geisel

Audrey Geisel

Audrey Geisel. Widow of Theodor Geisel (Dr. Seuss) and exec producer of Horton Hears a Who! (2008), The Lorax (2012) and Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch (2018). She also exec produced the Emmy-nominated short Daisy-Head Mayzie (1995). Died Dec. 19, age 97.

Bruno Gaumetou. French animator and studio manager (Neomis Animation) and CEO (AGT Digital), whose credits include Babar, DuckTales: The Movie, TaleSpin, Darkwing Duck, Goof Troop, Marsupilami, A Goofy Movie and The Illusionist (producer). Died October, age 59.

Stephen Hillenburg

Stephen Hillenburg

Stephen Hillenburg. Writer, director, creator of Nickelodeon’s SpongeBob SquarePants, one of the most popular and influential animated shows of the past 20 years and its two spin-off features. Died Nov. 26, age 57.

Margot Kidder

Margot Kidder

Margot Kidder. Beloved actress who was considered to be the quintessential Lois Lane in the Superman movies (with Christopher Reeve). Was also the voice of Gaia (Captain Planet and the Planeteers) and Mistress Helga (AAAHH!!! Real Monsters). Died May 18, age 69.

Gary Kurtz with Harrison Ford

Gary Kurtz with Harrison Ford

Gary Kurtz. Producer of features such as Star Wars, The Dark Crystal, Return to Oz and animated titles such as The Thief and the Cobbler, The Tale of Jack Frost and Friends and Heroes. Died Sept. 23, Age 78.

Stan Lee

Stan Lee

Stan Lee. Marvel comics legend (publisher, writer, editor) and co-creator of enduring characters such as Spider-Man, The X-Men, The Incredible Hulk and The Fantastic Four. Died Nov. 12, age 83.

Carlos Lemos. Cartoonist and storyboard artist whose credits include animated TV series Fantastic Four, The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest, Iron Man, Godzilla The Series and Men in Black: The Series. Died March 16, age 84.

Bud Luckey

Bud Luckey

Bud Luckey. Animator, voice actor and songwriter. Designed Woody (Toy Story) and was the voice of Eeyore, Agent Rick Dicker and Chuckles the Clown. Directed the Oscar-nominated short Boundin‘. Died Feb. 23, age 84.

Michael Lyman. Timing director on over 100 TV series including Adventure Time, im Possible, Rugrats, Family Guy, King of the Hill, Godzilla: The Series and She-Ra and the Princesses of Power. Died Oct. 6, age 67.

John Mahoney. Veteran character actor, best known for playing the down-to-earth dad on Frasier, provided the voice of the general in The Iron Giant. Died Feb. 5, age 89.

Roger Mainwood

Roger Mainwood

Roger Mainwood. British animator and director who brought several Raymond Briggs’ beloved classics to the screen. He worked on Heavy Metal, The Snowman, When the Wind Blows and Father Christmas; directed the TV series The World of Peter Rabbit, Stressed Eric and Meg and Mog and the acclaimed movie Ethel & Ernest. Died Oct. 5, age 65.

Chuck McCann. Third-generation performer and lifelong actor whose voice over credits include G.I. Joe, The Smurfs, Gummy Bears, DuckTales (Duckworth, Burger Beagle), The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh, TaleSpin, The Powerpuff Girls and Adventure Time. Died April 8, age 83.

Dave Michener. Writer, director and animation supervisor at Disney and various other studios. Directed Disney’s The Great Mouse Detective and was writer on Oliver & Company, The Fox and the Hound, The Rescuers and Robin Hood. Also worked on Winnie the Pooh and The Aristocats. Died Feb. 15, age 85.

Jacques Muller

Jacques Muller

Jacques Muller. French animator who worked at Disney, Sullivan-Bluth, Amblimation, ILM and Warner Bros. Credits include Pound Puppies, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Paula Abdul video “Opposites Attract,” The Rescuers Down Under, Space Jam, Small Soldiers, The Emperor’s New Groove, Sylvain Chomet’s The Illusionist and The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle. Died Nov. 4, age 62.

David Ogden Stiers

David Ogden Stiers

David Ogden Stiers. M*A*S*H star best known to animation as the voice of Cogsworth in Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, as well as roles in Pocahontas, Atlantis, Justice League, Winnie the Pooh and Regular Show. Died March 3, age 75.

Fred Patten. L.A.-based writer, editor and publicist. One of the first anime experts in the U.S. who adapted Tekkaman, the Space Knight, and was story/script editor on The Castle of Cagliostro, Barefoot Gen, Lupin III: Tales of the Wolf, 8-Man and Lupin III: The Mystery of Mamo. Died Nov. 12, age 78.

Rick Reinert. Director, producer and long-time owner of Rick Reinert Productions. Worked at Disney TV and Bill Melendez Productions. Directed several Winnie the Pooh shorts and ABC Weekend Specials in the 1980s, was also an animation artist on Mrs. Doubtfire and animation supervisor on It Was My Best Birthday Ever, Charlie Brown (1997). Died Nov. 7, Age 93.

Momoko Sakura. Manga writer and illustrator, video game and character designer. Born Miki Miura in Shimizu, Japan, Sakura created the incredibly successful graphic novel and anime property Chibi Maruko-chan. Other notable works include surreal fantasy manga Coji-Coji. Died August 15, age 53.

Jon Schnepp

Jon Schnepp

Jon Schnepp. Producer, director, voice actor, editor, writer and animator. Wrote and directed The Death of Superman Lives: What Happened and directed episodes of Metalocalypse and The Venture Bros. Was also animator on Nerdland. Died July 19, age 51.

Marie Severin

Marie Severin

Marie Severin. Multi-faceted, pioneering comic-book artist who drew most of the greatest heroes in the Marvel comics and designed the first Spider-Woman. Among her most notable work were runs of Doctor Strange, The Incredible Hulk and The Sub-Mariner. Died Aug. 30, age 89.

Steve Swaja. Prop designer on shows such as Lazer Tag Academy, Centurions, ALFTails, Starcom: The U.S. Space Force, G.I. Joe, James Bond Jr. and RoboCop: Alpha Commando. Died Jan. 16, age 89.

Isao Takahata

Isao Takahata

Isao Takahata. Japanese animation director, writer and producer and co-founder of Studio Ghibli. Credits include Grave of the Fireflies, The Tale of the Princess Kaguya, Only Yesterday. Died April 5, age 82.

Will Vinton

Will Vinton

Will Vinton. Oscar-winning stop-motion animation pioneer, coined the term claymation, founder of Will Vinton Studios. Oversaw the creation of Emmy-winning projects including The PJs, A Claymation Christmas Celebration and A Claymation Easter, and received Oscar nominations for Rip Van Winkle, The Great Cognito and The Creation. Died Oct. 4, age 70.

Scott Watson. Disney Imagineering CTO, who held 45 patents, ranging from real-time rendering tools for CG to new approaches to theme park vehicle designs. Also helped develop a system for interactive multi-screen TV broadcasts and helped produce some of Disney’s most famous theme park attractions including Indiana Jones Adventure and the Aladdin’s Magic Carpet Ride VR project. Died Aug. 12, age 55.

Len Wein. Comic-book and animation writer, best known for creating Wolverine and Swamp Thing (with Bernie Wrightson). He also wrote for TV shows such as Batman: The Animated Series, Godzilla, X-Men, ReBoot and Ben 10: Alien Force. Died Oct. 10, age 69.

Doug Young. Prolific voice actor who was heard in many Hanna-Barbera cartoons between 1959 and around 1965. Best known as the voice of Doggie Daddy in the Quick Draw McGraw series. Other credits include The Flintstones, The Huckleberry Hound Show and The Peter Potamus Show. Died January 7, age 98.

Animation Magazine

Lost Oswald Short from Disney Discovered in Japan

An animation historian in Japan has come forward with a lost Oswald the Lucky Rabbit cartoon which had been in his collection for 70 years. The plucky bunny character created by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks was a precursor to Mickey Mouse.

Yasushi Watanabe, now 84 years old, had bought the two-minute 16mm cartoon from a toy wholesaler in Osaka when he was a teenager for ¥500 (less than $ 5 USD at the current exchange rate). Originally titled “Neck & Neck,” film had been labeled Mickey Manga Spide (“Mickey Cartoon Speedy”). It was only when Watanabe read Disney animator David Bossert’s 2017 book Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Disney Cartoons that he realized what he had.

(You can read an excerpt from Bossert’s book here.)

Watanabe told the Asahi Shimbun that he has been a fan of Disney animation for many years and was happy to help bring the short back into the light. The Walt Disney Archive has confirmed the cartoon as one of the handful of missing Oswald shorts. In 2015, a lost Oswald short was found in the archives of the British Film Institute in London. The year before, one was discovered in Norway.

“What’s particularly good about this story is that it shows the spread of these films across the globe,” Jez Stewart, the BFI’s animation curator, told the BBC. “How the films propagated across the world and where they end up is almost as interesting as the film itself.”

Oswald was created by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks in 1927, and was the studio’s first character to star in its own shorts series. There were 27 cartoons made before the Lucky Rabbit instigated an intellectual property dispute, and the rights were lost ot Universal Studios. The loss of Oswald prompted Disney to work on a new star, the now world-famous Mickey Mouse. Disney CEO Bob Iger bought back the rights to Oswald in 2006.

[Source: BBC News]

Animation Magazine

Lone woman digs for family lost under Guatemalan volcanic rubble

SAN MIGUEL LOS LOTES, Guatemala (Reuters) – Eleven days after the Fuego volcano rained down on the Guatemalan village of San Miguel Los Lotes, a backhoe ripped the roof off one of the homes buried by ash, revealing a corpse in the still-hot dust.

“It’s my sister Lola,” said Eufemia Garcia Ixpata, a 48-year-old fruit vendor who lost dozens of family members in the eruption.

Mexican volunteer rescue workers grabbed their shovels and rushed in to recover the body from the rubble and dust.

Garcia ran to find a sheet of paper and a marker to prepare a name tag before the body was taken to a grade school that was being used as a makeshift morgue.

She had lost her family and her home, and had been sleeping in a school room with other survivors. Reuters photographer Carlos Jasso accompanied her for seven days.

Getting up at 5 a.m., she jumped out of a narrow blue folding bed, and washed one of only two changes of clothing that she had left before bathing.

She gathered her hair into a ponytail and set out to look for her lost and buried family. Fito, her boyfriend of eight years, was her only companion.

“You see, last Sunday, we found remains of my mom. We found one of the children yesterday. So, we are getting results,” she said.

At her mother’s house, she had found only a tooth and a pair of bones.

Every day, she made her way up the mountain slope to where Los Lotes used to be, waiting for one of the bulldozers tasked with clearing the area to arrive.

She pointed down at the strange, new ground where half of a tree peeked out.

“This was my house,” Garcia said as she walked across the gray desert, pointing out where her mother used to live, and where the homes of her sisters and in-laws had stood. Everything was buried.

Eufemia Garcia, 48, who lost 50 members of her family during the eruption of the Fuego volcano, prays with members of the evangelical church while searching for her family in San Miguel Los Lotes in Escuintla, Guatemala, June 11, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

And still, the volcano smoldered. An alarm sounded, warning of another potential wave of hot ash, lava fragments, and gases exploding from the volcano and rolling down the mountain, swallowing everything in its path.

Whenever those alarms suspend the search for more bodies, Garcia returns to the morgue or checks the hospitals. The same routine, every day. She eats as an afterthought, or when an aid worker shoves a bowl of food in front of her.

Guatemalan rescue workers had only searched during the first three days after the tragedy, calling off efforts as the volcano continued to rumble and hot vapors melted the soles of their shoes.

That was when Garcia decided to search on her own. She had no goggles to protect her eyes, rarely wore a mask on her face, and walked impatiently in the rubble, in sandals.

“The volcano has calmed down. It is nothing to worry about, because everything that it had to blow has already been blown out. So now, with the permission of our Lord and the volcano, we are working,” she said.

Fuego had slept for 40 years, but on Sunday, June 3, it ejected tons of earth, ash and colossal stones that buried hundreds of homes and left at least 112 people dead.

In the early days after the eruption, Garcia thought she had lost all her children.

However, as the days passed, three of her six children, 31, 22 and 19 years old, plus a granddaughter, appeared at different shelters.

Four of her nine brothers that she feared were dead also turned up alive. Some called her on the phone when they found out that she was looking for them, while she found others in hospitals.

But the bodies of three of her children remained missing.

“I will finish my search when I find them,” she said, drying her tears.

During the seven days that Reuters accompanied Garcia, she had found one body in the house of her former father-in-law, two at her sister’s house, and the partial remains at her mother’s home.

(For the related photo essay, click on reut.rs/2th4Put)

Slideshow (31 Images)

Editing by Bernadette Baum

Reuters: Oddly Enough

Lone woman digs for family lost under Guatemalan volcanic rubble

SAN MIGUEL LOS LOTES, Guatemala (Reuters) – Eleven days after the Fuego volcano rained down on the Guatemalan village of San Miguel Los Lotes, a backhoe ripped the roof off one of the homes buried by ash, revealing a corpse in the still-hot dust.

Eufemia Garcia, 48, who lost 50 members of her family during the eruption of the Fuego volcano, prays with members of the evangelical church while searching for her family in San Miguel Los Lotes in Escuintla, Guatemala, June 11, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

“It’s my sister Lola,” said Eufemia Garcia Ixpata, a 48-year-old fruit vendor who lost dozens of family members in the eruption.

Mexican volunteer rescue workers grabbed their shovels and rushed in to recover the body from the rubble and dust.

Garcia ran to find a sheet of paper and a marker to prepare a name tag before the body was taken to a grade school that was being used as a makeshift morgue.

She had lost her family and her home, and had been sleeping in a school room with other survivors. Reuters photographer Carlos Jasso accompanied her for seven days.

Getting up at 5 a.m., she jumped out of a narrow blue folding bed, and washed one of only two changes of clothing that she had left before bathing.

She gathered her hair into a ponytail and set out to look for her lost and buried family. Fito, her boyfriend of eight years, was her only companion.

“You see, last Sunday, we found remains of my mom. We found one of the children yesterday. So, we are getting results,” she said.

At her mother’s house, she had found only a tooth and a pair of bones.

Eufemia Garcia, 48, who lost 50 members of her family during the eruption of the Fuego volcano, reacts after a day searching for her family in San Miguel Los Lotes in Escuintla, Guatemala, June 15, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

Every day, she made her way up the mountain slope to where Los Lotes used to be, waiting for one of the bulldozers tasked with clearing the area to arrive.

She pointed down at the strange, new ground where half of a tree peeked out.

“This was my house,” Garcia said as she walked across the gray desert, pointing out where her mother used to live, and where the homes of her sisters and in-laws had stood. Everything was buried.

And still, the volcano smoldered. An alarm sounded, warning of another potential wave of hot ash, lava fragments, and gases exploding from the volcano and rolling down the mountain, swallowing everything in its path.

Whenever those alarms suspend the search for more bodies, Garcia returns to the morgue or checks the hospitals. The same routine, every day. She eats as an afterthought, or when an aid worker shoves a bowl of food in front of her.

Guatemalan rescue workers had only searched during the first three days after the tragedy, calling off efforts as the volcano continued to rumble and hot vapors melted the soles of their shoes.

That was when Garcia decided to search on her own. She had no goggles to protect her eyes, rarely wore a mask on her face, and walked impatiently in the rubble, in sandals.

Slideshow (30 Images)

“The volcano has calmed down. It is nothing to worry about, because everything that it had to blow has already been blown out. So now, with the permission of our Lord and the volcano, we are working,” she said.

Fuego had slept for 40 years, but on Sunday, June 3, it ejected tons of earth, ash and colossal stones that buried hundreds of homes and left at least 112 people dead.

In the early days after the eruption, Garcia thought she had lost all her children.

However, as the days passed, three of her six children, 31, 22 and 19 years old, plus a granddaughter, appeared at different shelters.

Four of her nine brothers that she feared were dead also turned up alive. Some called her on the phone when they found out that she was looking for them, while she found others in hospitals.

But the bodies of three of her children remained missing.

“I will finish my search when I find them,” she said, drying her tears.

During the seven days that Reuters accompanied Garcia, she had found one body in the house of her former father-in-law, two at her sister’s house, and the partial remains at her mother’s home.

(For the related photo essay, click on reut.rs/2th4Put)

Editing by Bernadette Baum

Reuters: Oddly Enough

Watch: Netflix’s ‘Lost in Space’ Is One Heck of a Family Road Trip

Lost in Space

Lost in Space

A midcentury TV classic gets a 21st century update in a VFX-rich new world in upcoming Netflix Original Lost in Space, produced by Legendary Television. Get a first look at the show’s visually rich onscreen adventure and go behind the scenes with the cast and showrunner Zack Estrin in the new featurette below, released ahead of the series’ April 13 premiere.

Lost in Space is a dramatic and modern reimagining of the classic 1960s science fiction series. Set 30 years in the future, colonization in space is now a reality, and the Robinson family is among those tested and selected to make a new life for themselves in a better world. But when the new colonists find themselves abruptly torn off course en route to their new home they must forge new alliances and work together to survive in a dangerous alien environment, lightyears from their original destination.

The show stars Toby Stephens (Black Sails) and Molly Parker (House of Cards) as John and Maureen Robinson, parents struggling with their estranged relationship as they try to keep their family safe. Taylor Russell (Falling Skies) plays strong-willed and confident daughter Judy, Mina Sundwall (Maggie’s Plan) is quick-witted and definitive middle child Penny, and Max Jenkins (Sense8) is curious and sensitive Will Robinson, the youngest of the clan who forms an unlikely bond with a sentient alien robot.

Also stranded on the Robinson’s uncharted planet are two outsiders united by a knack for deception: The unsettlingly charismatic Dr. Smith played by Parker Posey (Café Society) is a master manipulator with an inscrutable end game. And the roguish, but inadvertently charming Don West, played by Ignacio Serricchio (Bones), is a highly-skilled, blue collar contractor, who had no intention of joining the colony, let alone crash landing on a lost planet.

Lost in Space

Lost in Space

Animation Magazine

Scientists Race To Regrow Lost Knee Cartilage

Nov. 27, 2017 — Bad knees sideline athletes and mere mortals alike.

About 14 million Americans have osteoarthritis of the knees severe enough to cause pain and inflammation, according to the Arthritis Foundation, and more people are getting the condition — also known as OA — as they age.

As the knee’s natural cushioning — the cartilage — wanes, inflammation and pain rise, and people can’t get around as well.

Building knee cartilage has been a dream of researchers, and now several methods are under study. None has yet shown it can prevent or cure osteoarthritis, and all are in early phases, caution the scientists who presented their findings at the recent annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology in San Diego, CA.

Stopping Excess Bone Breakdown

A treatment known as MIV-711 targets an enzyme called cathepsin K that is thought to play a role in the destruction of cartilage and the breakdown of too much bone.

Stimulating Cartilage

Another treatment, sprifermin, is a type of human fibroblast growth factor, which plays a role in cell growth and tissue repair. “It stimulates the cells in the cartilage to make more cartilage,” says Marc Hochberg, MD, primary investigator of the study and head of rheumatology and clinical immunology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

He reported on the 2-year results of what will be a 5-year study. “The cartilage becomes thicker, and it will do a better job of shock absorption and it will slow the progression of already established knee OA,” he says.

Stopping Cartilage Breakdown

Another treatment works with tissue regeneration and stops an enzyme from breaking down cartilage in the knee, says Yusuf Yazici, MD, chief medical officer of Samumed, a medical research and development

Perspective

Choosing which of the new treatments is most promising is difficult, says Brian Feeley, MD, an associate professor of sports medicine and orthopedic surgery at the University of California, San Francisco. He was not involved in the studies but reviewed the findings.

“The studies are all done slightly differently, so it’s hard to compare.” But, he says, so far, the improvement in some cases is very small.

Bottom line, for now? “Although the data does not show that these treatments are going to prevent or cure arthritis, the agents may be able to slow the progression of arthritis, which we don’t yet have the ability to do,” Feeley says.

Sources

American College of Rheumatology 2017 annual meeting, San Diego, CA, Nov. 3-8, 2017.

Philip Conaghan, MD, PhD, professor of musculoskeletal medicine, University of Leeds, UK; consults for Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Flexion Therapeutics, AbbVie, Infirst, Medivir, Merck Serono, and ONO Pharmaceutical Co.

Marc Hochberg, MD, head of rheumatology and clinical immunology, University of Maryland School of Medicine; consults for Merck, Bioiberica SA, Bristol-Myers Squibb, EMD Serono, Galapagos, IBSA SA, Eli Lilly, Novartis Pharma AG, Pfizer Inc., Plexxikon, Samumed LLC, Theralogix LLC, and TissueGene.

Yusuf Yazici, MD, clinical associate professor of medicine, New York University School of Medicine; is chief medical officer for Samumed LLC.

Brian Feeley, MD, associate professor, sports medicine and orthopedic surgery, University of California, San Francisco.

Arthritis Foundation: “Arthritis Facts.”

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