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Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses Top 2,100, CDC Says

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 — The number of Americans stricken with a severe lung illness tied to vaping has now reached 2,172, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday.

That’s a rise from the 2,051 case total from a week ago.

Cases have now been reported in every state except Alaska, the agency noted.

The related death toll has also risen by three over the past week, to 42 fatalities, spread across 24 states and the District of Columbia. Deaths have involved patients ranging from the ages of 17 to 75, with a median age of 52.

The CDC has noted that more than 85% of cases involved products that contained THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana.

And just last week, a federal report pointed to an oily chemical known as vitamin E acetate as the likely culprit behind these severe lung illnesses.

Young men are being especially affected, with 70% of patients being male and 79% under the age of 35.

Dr. Anne Schuchat, principal deputy director of the CDC, has stressed that nicotine-containing vaping products without THC cannot be ruled out as a potential cause of harm. Because of that, the CDC recommendation for everyone to stop vaping stands, she said.

What is clear is that the illnesses that are affecting vapers can be sudden and severe. Symptoms include cough, shortness of breath and chest pains. Some patients have had so much trouble breathing that they wind up on oxygen, and in extreme cases are placed on a mechanical ventilator.

In recent weeks, Juul — the top-selling brand of electronic cigarettes in the United States — has announced that it would no longer sell mint, fruit or dessert flavors of its products.

The company’s moves came as it faces widespread criticism that its flavored nicotine products are hooking a generation of teenagers on nicotine and vaping.

The company also faces multiple investigations by U.S. Congress, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and several state attorneys general. Juul is also being sued by adults and underage vapers who allege they became addicted to nicotine by using Juul’s products, the wire service said.

The Trump administration has also proposed banning nearly all e-cigarette flavors.

More information

The American Lung Association has more about vaping and lung health.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: November 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Double Lung Transplant in Vaping Case a Success

Nov. 12, 2019 — The first double lung transplant done as a result of a vaping injury is a success, with the 17-year-old high school athlete on the road to recovery, doctors at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit said Tuesday.

Doctors did the 6-hour transplant Oct. 15 after the patient’s situation became more and more critical. Doctors describing the surgery at a news conference Tuesday said the lung injury came entirely from vaping.

“What I saw in his lungs is something I never saw before, and I have been doing lung transplants for 20 years,” said Hassan Nemeh, MD, surgical director of thoracic organ transplant at Henry Ford Hospital. He was one of three surgeons on the transplant team. “This is an evil I have not faced before.”

The patient, previously an active high schooler, is still hospitalized. He is close to being transferred to rehab and is expected to be able to return to school. Nemeh said he hopes the teen will talk about the dangers of vaping. “I would expect him to be an advocate to stop this madness.”

The donor was healthy, Nemeh said, but gave no further details.

The severity of the teen’s condition quickly put him high on the national waiting list, Nemeh said.

The teen was admitted to a hospital on Sept. 5 and needed intubation by Sept. 12. On Sept. 17, he was hooked up to a heart-lung machine treatment called ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) to keep him alive. He continued to decline and was transferred to Henry Ford on Oct. 3, then put on the waiting list on Oct. 8.

The family of the teen asked for privacy but asked the medical team to share a statement: “He has gone from the typical life of a perfectly healthy 16-year-old athlete — attending high school, hanging out with friends, sailing and playing video games — to waking up intubated and with two new lungs, facing a long and painful recovery process as he struggles to regain his strength and mobility, which has been severely impacted.”

He turned 17 while in the hospital, doctors said.

Lung Transplants in the U.S.

In 2018, 2,530 lung transplant procedures (including both single and double) were done in the U.S., according to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. No breakdown is available on what percent were double.

There are now 1,422 patients on the waiting list for a lung.

During the procedure, a surgeon removes the diseased lung or lungs and attaches the donor lung or lungs to the airway and the blood vessels that lead to and away from the heart. In some cases, the lungs are transplanted along with a donor heart.

Among the common reasons for a transplant are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung scarring from pulmonary fibrosis, high blood pressure in the lungs known as pulmonary hypertension, or cystic fibrosis, a hereditary disorder that affects the lungs.

Experts Weigh In

A transplant is called for only when there’s severe lung damage, says Wayne Tsuang, MD, an assistant professor of medicine at Cleveland Clinic and a practicing lung transplant pulmonologist. He was not involved in the Detroit patient’s medical care.

“It would have to be end-stage lung disease, in that all the potential medical treatments were exhausted and the team taking good care of him had no other options to salvage his lungs,” he says.

Among those options are oxygen, prescribing steroids to lessen the inflammation in the lungs, and giving antibiotics if pneumonia sets in.

“There are different criteria for different diseases, but overall, very severe lung disease [has to be present],” agrees Mangala Narasimhan, DO, regional director of critical care medicine and a pulmonologist at Northwell Health, New Hyde Park, NY. She was not involved in the Detroit patient’s medical care.

In general, Tsuang says, 1-year survival is about 85%, while 50% of transplant recipients are alive at 5 years. The range varies greatly and depends on things like other health conditions that may be present.

“The median survival for all adult recipients is 6.5 years,” says Narasimhan, citing 2018 national statistics.

The long recovery includes taking anti-rejection medications for the rest of the patient’s life. Often, that involves a dozen new medications, Tsuang says.

Sources

News conference, Henry Ford Health System, Nov. 12, 2019.

Wayne Tsuang, MD, assistant professor of medicine and lung transplant pulmonologist, Cleveland Clinic.

Mangala Narasimhan, DO, regional director of critical care medicine and pulmonologist, Northwell Health, New Hyde Park, NY.

Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network.

© 2019 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Vitamin E Acetate Is Leading Suspect in Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses: CDC

FRIDAY, Nov. 8, 2019 — A new federal report points to an oily chemical known as vitamin E acetate as the likely culprit behind more than 2,000 cases of severe lung illness among vapers.

After taking fluid samples from the lungs of 29 vapers who were hospitalized for the illness in 10 states, scientists from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention spotted the chemical in all of the samples.

“This is the first reported identification of a potential toxicant of concern (vitamin E acetate) in biologic specimens obtained from [these] patients,” the researchers said in the Nov. 8 online edition of the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. “These findings provide direct evidence of vitamin E acetate at the primary site of injury.”

But the CDC researchers added that more study is still needed.

“Based on these data from 29 patients, it appears that vitamin E acetate is associated with [severe lung illness]; however, it is possible that more than one compound or ingredient could be a cause of lung injury, and evidence is not yet sufficient to rule out contribution of other toxicants,” according to Benjamin Blount and his colleagues at the CDC.

Vitamin E acetate is derived from vitamin E, which is found in vegetable oils, nuts and seeds, and leafy green veggies. It is available as a dietary supplement and skin treatment.

But when vaped and inhaled, this oil can harm lung cells, one respiratory expert has said.

“My understanding of vitamin E acetate, the oil, is that it needs to be heated to a very high temperature in order to be transformed into a vapor,” said Patricia Folan, who directs the Center for Tobacco Control at Northwell Health, in Great Neck, N.Y.

“However, when an individual inhales the vapor into their lungs, the temperature in their lungs is lower, causing the substance to return to its oil state,” she added. “This in turn causes shortness of breath, lung damage and the respiratory illness being seen in [these] individuals.”

Dr. Teresa Murray Amato is chair of emergency medicine at Long Island Jewish Forest Hills, in New York City. She noted that, “once inhaled, oil can set off an inflammatory response that can lead to severe lung injury. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is one of the dreaded complications as it can lead to the need for intubation — placing a breathing tube — and being placed on a ventilator to assist in the respiratory effort.” In the most severe cases, ARDS can prove fatal, she added.

As of Thursday, the number of Americans stricken with severe lung illness tied to vaping had reached 2,051, the CDC reported.

That’s a rise from the 1,888 case total from a week ago.

Cases have been reported in every state except Alaska, the agency noted.

The related death toll has also risen by two over the past week, to 39 fatalities, spread across 24 states and the District of Columbia. Deaths have involved patients ranging from the ages of 17 to 75, with a median age of 53.

The CDC has noted that 86% of cases involved products that contained THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana.

Young men are being especially affected, with 70% of patients being male and 79% under the age of 35.

In light of the most recent findings on vitamin E acetate, the CDC continues to recommend that people refrain from vaping.

More information

The American Lung Association has more about vaping and lung health.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: November 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Close to 1,900 Cases of Vaping-Linked Lung Illness, CDC Says

THURSDAY, Oct. 31, 2019 — The number of Americans stricken with a severe, sometimes fatal lung illness tied to vaping has now reached 1,888, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday.

That’s a rise from the 1,604 case total from a week ago.

Currently, cases have been reported in every state except Alaska, the agency noted.

The related death toll has also risen by three over the past week, to 37 fatalities, spread across 24 states and the District of Columbia. Deaths have involved patients ranging from the ages of 17 to 75, with the average age being 49.

No new data on possible factors driving these illnesses was released in the new report. However, last week the CDC noted that 86% of cases involved products that contained THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana.

Young men are being especially affected, with 70% of patients being male and 79% under the age of 35.

While THC remains a main suspect in the CDC’s investigation, a recent study suggested other chemicals might play a role.

For example, researchers at the Mayo Clinic Arizona conducted an examination of 17 cases involving vaping-linked lung injury — including lung biopsies. All of the patients examined had severe forms of the illness, and two had died.

“Based on what we have seen in our study, we suspect that most cases involve chemical contaminants, toxic byproducts or other noxious agents within vape liquids,” said lead researcher Dr. Brandon Larsen. He’s a surgical pathologist at the Mayo Clinic Arizona in Scottsdale.

Those findings were published earlier this month in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Dr. Anne Schuchat, principal deputy director of the CDC, has stressed that nicotine-containing vaping products without THC cannot be ruled out as a potential cause of harm. Because of that, the CDC recommendation for everyone to stop vaping still stands, she said.

What is clear is that the illnesses that are affecting vapers can be sudden and severe. Symptoms include cough, shortness of breath and chest pains. Some patients have had so much trouble breathing that they wind up on oxygen, and in extreme cases are placed on a mechanical ventilator.

The CDC’s updated numbers come two weeks after Juul — the top-selling brand of electronic cigarettes in the United States — announced that it would no longer sell fruit or dessert flavors of its products.

The company’s decision comes as it faces widespread criticism that its flavored nicotine products are hooking a generation of teenagers on nicotine and vaping, the Associated Press reported.

The company also faces multiple investigations by U.S. Congress, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and several state attorneys general. Juul is also being sued by adults and underage vapers who allege they became addicted to nicotine by using Juul’s products, the wire service said.

The Trump administration has also proposed banning nearly all e-cigarette flavors.

The flavors dropped by Juul will be mango, creme, fruit and cucumber, which account for 10% of its sales. The company will continue to sell its most popular flavors: mint and menthol, the AP reported.

Juul’s decision to continue selling mint and menthol shows “it isn’t serious about preventing youth use,” said Matthew Myers, from the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

“Juul knows that 64% of high school e-cigarette users now use mint or menthol flavors, and this number is growing all the time,” Myers said in a statement.

His group and others say the Trump administration should ban all vaping flavors except tobacco, the AP added.

More information

The American Lung Association has more about vaping and lung health.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: October 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

‘Chemical Burns’ May Be Vaping Lung Damage Source

Oct. 3, 2019 — Lung injuries from vaping probably result from tissue damage caused by noxious chemical fumes, rather than from organic compounds in the lungs, data suggest.

“We were not surprised by what we found, regarding toxicity,” Brandon T. Larsen, MD, PhD, a surgical pathologist at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, AZ, and a national expert in lung pathology, says in a news release.

“We have seen a handful of cases, scattered individual cases, over the past 2 years where we’ve observed the same thing, and now we are seeing a sudden spike in cases. Our study offers the first detailed review of the abnormalities that may be seen in lung biopsies to help clinicians and pathologists make a diagnosis,” Larsen says.

To learn more about the vaping-associated lung injuries, Larsen and colleagues studied lung biopsies from 17 patients (13 men; median age, 35 years) who said they vaped and who were suspected of having lung injuries from it. Two of the patients were from the Mayo Clinic, and the others were from elsewhere in the United States. Most (71%) of them vaped with marijuana or cannabis oils.

The findings were published online Oct. 2 in TheNew England Journal of Medicine.

All of the lung biopsy specimens revealed “patterns of acute lung injury,” a type of pneumonia, and other problems, the authors say.

The researchers saw no evidence of tissue damage from lipids such as mineral oils, which until now have been a suspected cause of vaping-linked lung injuries.

“While we can’t discount the potential role of lipids, we have not seen anything to suggest this is a problem caused by lipid accumulation in the lungs. Instead, it seems to be some kind of direct chemical injury, similar to what one might see with exposures to toxic chemical fumes, poisonous gases and toxic agents,” Larsen says in the news release.

More than 800 lung injury cases have been linked to vaping during the past months, and at least 17 patients ihave died. Investigators believe products that contain THC or other cannabis oils such as cannabidiol may be involved.

Continued

Some states have temporarily banned the sale of e-cigarettes or the flavored liquids used in the products, pending health investigations. The FDA is considering banning all nontobacco-flavored vaping liquids. The CDC cautions that children, young adults, pregnant women, and adults who don’t use tobacco products should not use e-cigarettes, and the American Lung Association says e-cigarettes are not safe and can cause permanent lung injury and disease.

“Everyone should recognize that vaping is not without potential risks, including life-threatening risks, and I think our research supports that,” Larsen says. “It would seem prudent based on our observations to explore ways to better regulate the industry and better educate the public, especially our youth, about the risks associated with vaping.”

Medscape Medical News

© 2019 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Childhood TB Shot May Offer Long-Term Protection from Lung Cancer

TUESDAY, Oct. 1, 2019 — A tuberculosis vaccine commonly used in other parts of the world might reduce a person’s risk of developing lung cancer if given early in childhood, a six-decade-long study reports.

The Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine is the only vaccine approved for preventing tuberculosis (TB) — a potentially fatal infectious disease that typically attacks the lungs. Because TB risk is low in the United States, the vaccine isn’t often given to American children, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But the new study suggests the vaccine may have some positive side effects.

“BCG-vaccinated participants had a significant 2.5-fold lower rate of lung cancer,” said study senior author Dr. Naomi Aronson, director of infectious diseases at Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, Md.

She said lower lung cancer rates persisted in those who received the vaccine no matter where they lived, and whether they smoked, drank alcohol or had tuberculosis.

Aronson said BCG affects the immune system somehow and may provide even more benefit in the lungs.

The initial study was conducted in 3,000 American Indian and Alaska Native children in the 1930s. If the findings are confirmed in different groups, Aronson said the use of BCG vaccine in childhood “might be considered for risk reduction for lung cancer over a lifetime.”

Dr. Len Lichtenfeld, interim chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, reviewed the study and called the findings fascinating. “And you rarely see this duration of follow-up,” he added. “The authors went to great lengths to validate their information.”

But, he said, it’s unlikely that BCG will be used for lung cancer prevention. While the study found a statistically significant reduction in the rate of lung cancer, the actual number of cases was very low. Just 42 people in the study were diagnosed with lung cancer.

There’s also a serious, ongoing shortage of BCG vaccine that would limit any such efforts, Lichtenfeld said. The vaccine is an effective treatment for a certain type of bladder cancer, and doctors find it hard to get enough for that purpose.

In addition, the BCG vaccine has been tested as a treatment in a number of other cancers with mixed results. In some cases, it looked as if lesions had shrunk, but the vaccine didn’t prolong survival, he explained.

Plus, Lichtenfeld said, there’s a very effective way to prevent many cases of lung cancer — don’t smoke. And, if you do, quit. “Tobacco causes most, but not all lung cancers. Not smoking helps prevent many cancers,” he said.

The initial study was conducted between 1935 and 1938. About 3,000 children from nine American Indian and Alaska Native tribes at multiple U.S. sites were randomly given the BCG vaccine or a placebo.

None of the youngsters had had tuberculosis. They were vaccinated between 5 and 11 years of age, with a median age of 8 years. Half were younger when they got the shot, half were older.

From 1992 to 1998, researchers reviewed health information from the trial participants.

There was no statistically significant differences in overall cancer rates between the vaccine and placebo groups. But the odds of lung cancer were significantly lower, the study found.

Researchers noted that lung cancer is a leading cause of death for Alaska Natives and Native Americans.

The study was published Sept. 25 in the journal JAMA Open.

More information

Read more about ways to prevent lung cancer from the American Cancer Society.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: October 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

CDC Says ‘Don’t Vape’ As Lung Injury Cases Rise

FRIDAY, Aug. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The number of people who’ve developed a severe form of lung disease potentially tied to vaping has now risen to 215 cases across 25 states, and federal health officials are recommending that Americans not use e-cigarettes.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a health advisory saying, “if you are concerned about these specific health risks, consider refraining from the use of e-cigarette products.”

As of Aug. 27, 215 possible cases have been reported — but other reported cases are also under investigation, the CDC noted.
Last week marked the first fatality tied to these lung crises: An adult in Illinois died after being hospitalized with a severe respiratory illness after using an e-cigarette.

“In many cases, patients reported a gradual start of symptoms, including breathing difficulty, shortness of breath, and/or chest pain before hospitalization,” the CDC explained in the advisory issued Friday. “Some cases reported mild to moderate gastrointestinal illness including vomiting and diarrhea, or other symptoms such as fevers or fatigue.”

The respiratory symptoms appear to be caused by inflammation that causes the lungs to fill with fluid, said Dr. Karen Wilson, vice chair of clinical and translational research for pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

Wilson first became aware of these cases a month ago, when the teenage son of a family friend wound up in the ICU with lung injuries possibly linked to vaping.

The 17-year-old is improving, and his prognosis is good, Wilson said.

“In general, I think kids are recovering from this, but it’s hard to say if there’s going to be any long-term risk of lung injury or asthma or other illness,” Wilson said.

According to the CDC, in many cases, patients have said they recently used tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-containing e-cigarette products. THC is the chemical in marijuana that provides a high.

“At this time, there does not appear to be one product involved in all of the cases,” the CDC said, “although THC and cannabinoids use has been reported in many cases. At this time, the specific substances within the e-cigarette products that cause illness are not known and could involve a variety of substances.”

Continued

Dr. Albert Rizzo is chief medical officer for the American Lung Association. He noted that e-cigarette vapor contains many ingredients that could cause lung irritation, such as ultrafine particles, oil, and heavy metals like nickel, tin and lead.

Flavored vapor also can contain diacetyl, a chemical linked to a condition called “popcorn lung,” Rizzo noted. The condition is so named because more than a decade ago workers in a microwave popcorn factory developed lung ailments after breathing in butter-flavored diacetyl.

In popcorn lung, the tiny air sacs in the lungs become scarred, resulting in the thickening and narrowing of the airways, the American Lung Association explained.

There’s also the possibility that heavy levels of nicotine are affecting the lungs, Rizzo added.

“One of the more common e-cigarettes contains as much nicotine in a pod as in a whole pack of cigarettes,” Rizzo said. “It’s very hard to smoke a pack of cigarettes in 15 minutes. You can ingest a whole pod by vaping in 15 minutes.”

In the meantime, the CDC said it and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are working with state health departments to gather information on any products or substances used by patients, including the brand and types of e-cigarette products, where they were obtained, and whether any fall under the FDA’s regulatory authority.

The FDA is providing laboratory assistance, and has so far received about 80 samples for testing.

Right now, CDC is advising against vaping. The agency says that if you do use e-cigarette products, be sure not to buy them off the street (for example, products containing THC), don’t modify the e-cigarette, and don’t add any substances that are not intended by the manufacturer.

It also said that when using e-cigarette products, look out for symptoms such as cough, shortness of breath and chest pain. Seek immediate medical attention if you have any concerns about your health.

The CDC has long advised that e-cigarette products not be used by youth, young adults, pregnant women, or adults who do not currently smoke “traditional” cigarettes.

Continued

Wilson agreed with that recommendation.

“Particularly for adolescents and young adults, they should not have access to these products and they should not use them,” she said. “This is more evidence they’re not a safe product for teenagers and young adults.”

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

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As Lung Injury Cases Rise, CDC Says ‘Don’t Vape’

FRIDAY, Aug. 30, 2019 — The number of people who’ve developed a severe form of lung disease potentially tied to vaping has now risen to 215 cases across 25 states, and federal health officials are recommending that Americans not use e-cigarettes.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a health advisory saying, “if you are concerned about these specific health risks, consider refraining from the use of e-cigarette products.”

As of Aug. 27, 215 possible cases have been reported — but other reported cases are also under investigation, the CDC noted.

Last week marked the first fatality tied to these lung crises: An adult in Illinois died after being hospitalized with a severe respiratory illness after using an e-cigarette.

“In many cases, patients reported a gradual start of symptoms, including breathing difficulty, shortness of breath, and/or chest pain before hospitalization,” the CDC explained in the advisory issued Friday. “Some cases reported mild to moderate gastrointestinal illness including vomiting and diarrhea, or other symptoms such as fevers or fatigue.”

The respiratory symptoms appear to be caused by inflammation that causes the lungs to fill with fluid, said Dr. Karen Wilson, vice chair of clinical and translational research for pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

Wilson first became aware of these cases a month ago, when the teenage son of a family friend wound up in the ICU with lung injuries possibly linked to vaping.

The 17-year-old is improving, and his prognosis is good, Wilson said.

“In general, I think kids are recovering from this, but it’s hard to say if there’s going to be any long-term risk of lung injury or asthma or other illness,” Wilson said.

According to the CDC, in many cases, patients have said they recently used tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-containing e-cigarette products. THC is the chemical in marijuana that provides a high.

“At this time, there does not appear to be one product involved in all of the cases,” the CDC said, “although THC and cannabinoids use has been reported in many cases. At this time, the specific substances within the e-cigarette products that cause illness are not known and could involve a variety of substances.”

Dr. Albert Rizzo is chief medical officer for the American Lung Association. He noted that e-cigarette vapor contains many ingredients that could cause lung irritation, such as ultrafine particles, oil, and heavy metals like nickel, tin and lead.

Flavored vapor also can contain diacetyl, a chemical linked to a condition called “popcorn lung,” Rizzo noted. The condition is so named because more than a decade ago workers in a microwave popcorn factory developed lung ailments after breathing in butter-flavored diacetyl.

In popcorn lung, the tiny air sacs in the lungs become scarred, resulting in the thickening and narrowing of the airways, the American Lung Association explained.

There’s also the possibility that heavy levels of nicotine are affecting the lungs, Rizzo added.

“One of the more common e-cigarettes contains as much nicotine in a pod as in a whole pack of cigarettes,” Rizzo said. “It’s very hard to smoke a pack of cigarettes in 15 minutes. You can ingest a whole pod by vaping in 15 minutes.”

In the meantime, the CDC said it and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are working with state health departments to gather information on any products or substances used by patients, including the brand and types of e-cigarette products, where they were obtained, and whether any fall under the FDA’s regulatory authority.

The FDA is providing laboratory assistance, and has so far received about 80 samples for testing.

Right now, CDC is advising against vaping. The agency says that if you do use e-cigarette products, be sure not to buy them off the street (for example, products containing THC), don’t modify the e-cigarette, and don’t add any substances that are not intended by the manufacturer.

It also said that when using e-cigarette products, look out for symptoms such as cough, shortness of breath and chest pain. Seek immediate medical attention if you have any concerns about your health.

The CDC has long advised that e-cigarette products not be used by youth, young adults, pregnant women, or adults who do not currently smoke “traditional” cigarettes.

Wilson agreed with that recommendation.

“Particularly for adolescents and young adults, they should not have access to these products and they should not use them,” she said. “This is more evidence they’re not a safe product for teenagers and young adults.”

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on e-cigarettes.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: August 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

First Death Tied to Lung Injury From Vaping Reported in Illinois

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 — An Illinois resident who was hospitalized after suffering severe respiratory illness related to vaping has died, state health officials reported Friday.

In addition, the number of reported cases of people who have used e-cigarettes or vaped and have been hospitalized with respiratory symptoms has doubled in Illinois this past week, state health officials said in a release. Details were not available on the person who died.

“Yesterday we received a report of a death of an adult who had been hospitalized with severe unexplained respiratory illness after reported vaping or e-cigarette use,” Dr. Jennifer Layden, chief medical officer for the Illinois Department of Public Health, said during a media briefing Friday afternoon with federal health officials.

“Illinois is working with the CDC, FDA, our local health departments and other state health departments to investigate products and devices that individuals have reportedly used,” Layden said.

A total of 22 people in Illinois, ranging in age from 17 to 38, have experienced respiratory illness after using e-cigarettes or vaping. The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) is working with local health departments to investigate another 12 suspected cases, the agency said.

“The severity of illness people are experiencing is alarming and we must get the word out that using e-cigarettes and vaping can be dangerous,” Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the IDPH said in a statement Friday. “We requested a team from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help us investigate these cases and they arrived in Illinois on Tuesday.”

On Friday, CDC officials updated its tally of such cases to 193, spread across 22 states. These cases have emerged in a relatively short timeframe — from June 28 through Aug. 20, agency officials said during a media briefing.

No age group is immune: E-cigarette users ranging from teenagers to middle-aged adults are falling ill with respiratory symptoms that include coughing, shortness of breath and fatigue.

Some patients have had so much trouble breathing that they wound up on a ventilator in their hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU), said Dr. Albert Rizzo, chief medical officer for the American Lung Association.

“We do have to be careful [to say] that this has not been linked to any specific device, or any specific chemical that might exist in a device,” Rizzo said. “The commonality is it’s mainly young people who’ve supposedly been vaping who ended up having respiratory symptoms.”

The respiratory symptoms appear to be caused by inflammation that causes the lungs to fill with fluid, said Dr. Karen Wilson, vice chair of clinical and translational research for the Jack and Lucy Clark Department of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City.

Testing shows that the inflammation is not caused by an infection, leading doctors to seek another explanation for lung irritation, Wilson and Rizzo said.

Wilson first became aware of these cases a month ago, when the teenage son of a family friend wound up in the ICU with lung injuries possibly linked to vaping.

The 17-year-old is improving, and his prognosis is good, Wilson said.

“In general, I think kids are recovering from this, but it’s hard to say if there’s going to be any long-term risk of lung injury or asthma or other illness,” Wilson said.

E-cigarette vapor contains many ingredients that could cause lung irritation, such as ultrafine particles, oil, and heavy metals like nickel, tin and lead, Rizzo said.

Flavored vapor also can contain diacetyl, a chemical linked to a condition called “popcorn lung,” Rizzo noted. The condition is so named because more than a decade ago workers in a microwave popcorn factory developed lung ailments after breathing in butter-flavored diacetyl.

In popcorn lung, the tiny air sacs in the lungs become scarred, resulting in the thickening and narrowing of the airways, the American Lung Association explained.

There’s also the possibility that heavy levels of nicotine are affecting the lungs, Rizzo added.

“One of the more common e-cigarettes contains as much nicotine in a pod as in a whole pack of cigarettes,” Rizzo said. “It’s very hard to smoke a pack of cigarettes in 15 minutes. You can ingest a whole pod by vaping in 15 minutes.”

The CDC has also noted that recent marijuana use could be a factor.

“In many cases, patients have acknowledged recent use of tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]-containing products while speaking to health care personnel or in follow-up interviews by health department staff,” the agency said. THC is the chemical in pot that gives users a high.

Wilson believes that parents should make sure their teenagers aren’t vaping, and also refrain from vaping in the presence of kids, to prevent secondhand exposure.

“Particularly for adolescents and young adults, they should not have access to these products and they should not use them,” Wilson said. “This is more evidence they’re not a safe product for teenagers and young adults.”

More information

The American Lung Association has more about e-cigarettes and popcorn lung.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: August 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

First Death Tied to Lung Injury From Vaping Reported in Illinois

By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) — An Illinois resident who was hospitalized after suffering severe respiratory illness related to vaping has died, state health officials reported Friday.

In addition, the number of reported cases of people who have used e-cigarettes or vaped and have been hospitalized with respiratory symptoms has doubled in Illinois this past week, state health officials said in a release. Details were not available on the person who died.

“Yesterday we received a report of a death of an adult who had been hospitalized with severe unexplained respiratory illness after reported vaping or e-cigarette use,” Dr. Jennifer Layden, chief medical officer for the Illinois Department of Public Health, said during a media briefing Friday afternoon with federal health officials.

“Illinois is working with the CDC, FDA, our local health departments and other state health departments to investigate products and devices that individuals have reportedly used,” Layden said.

A total of 22 people in Illinois, ranging in age from 17 to 38, have experienced respiratory illness after using e-cigarettes or vaping. The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) is working with local health departments to investigate another 12 suspected cases, the agency said.

“The severity of illness people are experiencing is alarming and we must get the word out that using e-cigarettes and vaping can be dangerous,” Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the IDPH said in a statement Friday. “We requested a team from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help us investigate these cases and they arrived in Illinois on Tuesday.”

On Friday, CDC officials updated its tally of such cases to 193, spread across 22 states. These cases have emerged in a relatively short timeframe — from June 28 through Aug. 20, agency officials said during a media briefing.

No age group is immune: E-cigarette users ranging from teenagers to middle-aged adults are falling ill with respiratory symptoms that include coughing, shortness of breath and fatigue.

Some patients have had so much trouble breathing that they wound up on a ventilator in their hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU), said Dr. Albert Rizzo, chief medical officer for the American Lung Association.

Continued

“We do have to be careful [to say] that this has not been linked to any specific device, or any specific chemical that might exist in a device,” Rizzo said. “The commonality is it’s mainly young people who’ve supposedly been vaping who ended up having respiratory symptoms.”

The respiratory symptoms appear to be caused by inflammation that causes the lungs to fill with fluid, said Dr. Karen Wilson, vice chair of clinical and translational research for the Jack and Lucy Clark Department of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City.

Testing shows that the inflammation is not caused by an infection, leading doctors to seek another explanation for lung irritation, Wilson and Rizzo said.

Wilson first became aware of these cases a month ago, when the teenage son of a family friend wound up in the ICU with lung injuries possibly linked to vaping.

The 17-year-old is improving, and his prognosis is good, Wilson said.

“In general, I think kids are recovering from this, but it’s hard to say if there’s going to be any long-term risk of lung injury or asthma or other illness,” Wilson said.

E-cigarette vapor contains many ingredients that could cause lung irritation, such as ultrafine particles, oil, and heavy metals like nickel, tin and lead, Rizzo said.

Flavored vapor also can contain diacetyl, a chemical linked to a condition called “popcorn lung,” Rizzo noted. The condition is so named because more than a decade ago workers in a microwave popcorn factory developed lung ailments after breathing in butter-flavored diacetyl.

In popcorn lung, the tiny air sacs in the lungs become scarred, resulting in the thickening and narrowing of the airways, the American Lung Association explained.

There’s also the possibility that heavy levels of nicotine are affecting the lungs, Rizzo added.

“One of the more common e-cigarettes contains as much nicotine in a pod as in a whole pack of cigarettes,” Rizzo said. “It’s very hard to smoke a pack of cigarettes in 15 minutes. You can ingest a whole pod by vaping in 15 minutes.”

Continued

The CDC has also noted that recent marijuana use could be a factor.

“In many cases, patients have acknowledged recent use of tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]-containing products while speaking to health care personnel or in follow-up interviews by health department staff,” the agency said. THC is the chemical in pot that gives users a high.

Wilson believes that parents should make sure their teenagers aren’t vaping, and also refrain from vaping in the presence of kids, to prevent secondhand exposure.

“Particularly for adolescents and young adults, they should not have access to these products and they should not use them,” Wilson said. “This is more evidence they’re not a safe product for teenagers and young adults.”

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Aug. 23, 2019, media briefing, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;  Aug. 23, 2019, statement, Illinois Department of Public Health; Albert Rizzo, M.D., chief medical officer,  American Lung Association; Karen Wilson, M.D., MPH, vice chair, clinical and translational research, Jack and Lucy Clark Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City;CBS News, CNN

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

Cases of Lung Injury Tied to Vaping Keep Rising

THURSDAY, Aug. 22, 2019 — Chance Ammirata was a vaper for almost two years. But three weeks ago, the 18-year-old began to have trouble breathing.

“I would say my chest felt like it was collapsing and tightening up, and I couldn’t breathe,” he told CBS News. After going to the emergency room, doctors told him his right lung had a hole in it and they would have to put a chest tube in immediately. Two days later, a surgeon repaired the hole.

Ammirata believes his vaping was the culprit behind his collapsed lung, and he has since started a social media campaign called #LungLove to convince other teens to throw away their e-cigarettes.

“I decided that spreading my story could help others not have to go through the same thing as me,” he explained on his Instagram account.

Ammirata is not the only American to have landed in the hospital with vaping-related lung troubles recently.

Late Wednesday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its tally of such cases to 153, spread across 16 states. These cases have emerged in a relatively short timeframe — from June 28 through Aug. 20, the agency said in a statement.

Cases have so far been recorded in California, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan, North Carolina, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin, the CDC said.

No age group is immune: E-cigarette users ranging from teenagers to middle-aged adults are falling ill with respiratory symptoms that include coughing, shortness of breath and fatigue.

Some patients have had so much trouble breathing that they wound up on a ventilator in their hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU), said Dr. Albert Rizzo, chief medical officer for the American Lung Association.

Public health officials in Wisconsin, Illinois, California, New York, Indiana and New Jersey are tracking the most cases, CNN reported.

“We do have to be careful [to say] that this has not been linked to any specific device, or any specific chemical that might exist in a device,” the ALA’s Rizzo said. “The commonality is it’s mainly young people who’ve supposedly been vaping who ended up having respiratory symptoms.”

The respiratory symptoms appear to be caused by inflammation that causes the lungs to fill with fluid, said Dr. Karen Wilson, vice chair of clinical and translational research for the Jack and Lucy Clark Department of Pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City.

Testing shows that the inflammation is not caused by an infection, leading doctors to seek another explanation for lung irritation, Wilson and Rizzo said.

Wilson first became aware of these cases a month ago, when the teenage son of a family friend wound up in the ICU with lung injuries possibly linked to vaping.

The 17-year-old is improving, and his prognosis is good, Wilson said.

“In general, I think kids are recovering from this, but it’s hard to say if there’s going to be any long-term risk of lung injury or asthma or other illness,” Wilson said.

The CDC recently put out a statement urging doctors to report all possible cases of vaping-associated lung illness to state or local health officials.

E-cigarette vapor contains many ingredients that could cause lung irritation, such as ultrafine particles, oil, and heavy metals like nickel, tin and lead, Rizzo said.

Flavored vapor also can contain diacetyl, a chemical linked to a condition called “popcorn lung,” Rizzo noted. The condition is so named because more than a decade ago workers in a microwave popcorn factory developed lung ailments after breathing in butter-flavored diacetyl.

In popcorn lung, the tiny air sacs in the lungs become scarred, resulting in the thickening and narrowing of the airways, the American Lung Association explained.

There’s also the possibility that heavy levels of nicotine are affecting the lungs, Rizzo added.

“One of the more common e-cigarettes contains as much nicotine in a pod as in a whole pack of cigarettes,” Rizzo said. “It’s very hard to smoke a pack of cigarettes in 15 minutes. You can ingest a whole pod by vaping in 15 minutes.”

In its Wednesday statement, the CDC also noted that recent marijuana use could be a factor.

“In many cases, patients have acknowledged recent use of tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]-containing products while speaking to health care personnel or in follow-up interviews by health department staff,” the agency said. THC is the chemical in pot that gives users a high.

Wilson believes that parents should make sure their teenagers aren’t vaping, and also refrain from vaping in the presence of kids, to prevent secondhand exposure.

“Particularly for adolescents and young adults, they should not have access to these products and they should not use them,” Wilson said. “This is more evidence they’re not a safe product for teenagers and young adults.”

More information

The American Lung Association has more about e-cigarettes and popcorn lung.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: August 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews