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How to Make the Most of Your Cannabinoid Oils

So, you hopped on board the latest and greatest trend in weed and purchased your very own cannabinoid oils. You are the proud owner of THC oil and/or CBD oil — but now what? Fortunately, weed oil is incredibly versatile, giving you unprecedented control over how you partake in your favorite psychotropic drug. Here are just a few ways you can make good use of your recent purchase.

Sublingual

“Sublingual” means below the tongue; it is a method of administering a number of different drugs, especially those that need to enter the bloodstream quickly. Related to sublingual administration is buccal administration, which requires you to place the drug between your gums and cheek.

Experts across industries agree that dosing with CBD or THC oil sublingually is the fastest and most effective way of benefiting from cannabinoids. This is because just beneath your tongue is an extremely thin mucous membrane, underneath which is a bundle of capillaries that connect to the rest of your bloodstream. By taking cannabinoids sublingually, you can give yourself near-immediate, more potent effects.

Capsules

Because you can purchase empty gel capsules online or at any drugstore, you can create your own pills from nearly anything — including cannabinoids. While capsules do require ingestion, which is a much slower and less potent method, they can be beneficial for those who don’t require such instantaneous or intense effects but who do require regular doses of the drug.

There are a few different recipes for cannabinoid capsules, but they all follow a common pattern: mixing some kind of edible oil (like canola oil, olive oil, coconut oil and the like) with your THC or CBD oil and using no-needle syringes to fill the empty capsules. You might consider adding other good-for-you ingredients, like turmeric or ginger, if you can also benefit from these.

Salves and Lotions

Cannabinoids don’t have to be inside the body to provide relief. If you suffer from any kind of skin, muscle or connective tissue issues, you might benefit greatly from a cannabinoid-infused salve or lotion. Salves are incredibly easy to make at home; all you do is mix your THC or CBD oil into coconut oil and/or shea butter, perhaps adding some essential oils like juniper or laurel leaf for additional pain-easing effects. Lotion takes a bit more work because it needs to be a bit more spreadable, but you can certainly DIY cannabinoid lotion, too.

If you want that head and body high, you shouldn’t go this route, but the earthy aroma and pain-fighting effects of cannabinoids can provide non-psychotropic benefits when applied topically.

Tea and CoffeeTea and Coffee

It isn’t uncommon to feel a bit jittery or uncomfortable after taking in caffeine from tea or coffee. Even if you need the pick-me-up, you might want something a bit more mellow to prevent you from becoming fidgety or on-edge. The calming effects of certain cannabinoids could improve your caffeine experience, so you might try dripping a few THC or CBD oil drops into your morning brew. Then again, some caffeine drinkers prefer to first infuse their cannabinoids with butter or coconut oil and then produce a bulletproof coffee or tea, which can sit better in the stomach.

Smoothies

Few foods are better than a good smoothie, but few cannabis lovers think to add cannabinoids to their smoothies. The truth is the earthy flavors of CBD and THC add more body to sweet fruit smoothies, creating a delectably well-rounded, nutritious and fun snack or meal. You can also mix your cannabinoid oils into chocolate smoothies or shakes if you aren’t partial to marijuana’s iconic taste and want to mask it almost entirely.

Cooked Meals

By infusing cannabinoid oils in traditional cooking oils, like olive oil, peanut oil and canola oil, you can easily and effortlessly make any meal a bit more exciting. You can use these infused oils to sauté, roast and/or marinate all manner of vegetables and meats. You can even use the oil to create a vinaigrette for your salad course. In these forms, CBD and THC oils will barely add any taste or scent to your meal, so you don’t need to worry overmuch about ruining your meal’s flavors or aromas.

Baked Goods

It should go without saying, but you can always use your CBD and THC oils in the prototypical weed-lover’s goodies: baked goods. As mentioned above, sugar and chocolate are good at masking the funkiness of cannabis, and it is easy to find all sorts of tried-and-tested recipes that serve your sweet tooth what it wants.

However, it is important to note that with any edible, including smoothies, cooked meals and baked goods, it is much more difficult to monitor the dose of cannabinoid entering your system. Often, you won’t start to feel the CBD or THC for a few hours, and even then, the experience might be weak. There is no shame in wanting this kind of cannabinoid experience, but you should know what you will be getting before you get into it.

CBD and THC oils are some of the best cannabinoid products on the market right now, primarily because of their versatility. You can use them nearly any which way, which makes them attractive to all manner of cannabis user — from the beginner interested in medicinal applications to the decades-devoted stoner looking for new experiences. It’s not a bad idea to get a bottle or two of cannabinoid oil and experiment to find what works for you.

Shane Dwyer
Author: Shane Dwyer
Shane Dwyer is a cannabis advocate who isn’t afraid to tell the world about it! You can find his views, rants, and tips published regularly at The 420 Times.

Marijuana & Cannabis News – The 420 Times

Most Popular BP Drugs Might Not Be the Best

By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Oct. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Millions of Americans take an ACE inhibitor to help curb their high blood pressure — in fact, these drugs are the most widely used antihypertensives in America.

However, a new international study of nearly 5 million patients is casting doubt on the notion that the drugs are as effective as another class of blood pressure medicines.

Common ACE inhibitors include drugs such as benazepril, captopril, enalapril, fosinopril and lisinopril, among others.

The new study should “help guide physicians in their clinical decision-making,” said study author Dr. George Hripcsak. He’s chair of biomedical informatics at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, in New York City.

American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines recommend starting blood pressure treatment with any drug from five different classes of medications. Those classes include: thiazide diuretics; ACE inhibitors; angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs); dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and non-dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers.

To find out how often these medicines are prescribed, Hripcsak’s team tracked data on nearly 5 million patients across four countries — Germany, Japan, South Korea and the United States.

All of the patients began treatment for high blood pressure by using a single drug.

In nearly half (48% ) of cases, ACE inhibitors were the first drug prescribed, compared with 17% of patients who were first prescribed thiazide diuretics, the team found.

But the study suggests that ACE inhibitors might not always be the best choice.

Patients who were prescribed thiazide diuretics ended up having 15% fewer heart attacks, strokes and hospitalizations for heart failure, as well as lower rates of 19 side effects, compared to those who had been prescribed ACE inhibitors.

Crunching the numbers, the Columbia team calculated that about 3,100 major cardiovascular events among the patients who first took ACE inhibitors could have been prevented if they’d first been treated with a thiazide diuretic.

They reported their findings Oct. 24 in The Lancet journal.

The researchers also found that another class of blood pressure meds, non-dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, were less effective than all of the other first-line classes of blood pressure drugs.

Continued

Right now, there’s a real lack of research aimed at helping doctors choose which drug class a patient should start on, Hripcsak believes.

He noted that the current literature has data from randomized, controlled clinical trials that included a total of just 31,000 patients, and none of those patients were just beginning treatment for high blood pressure.

“Randomized clinical trials demonstrate a drug’s effectiveness and safety in a highly defined patient population,” Hripcsak explained in a university news release. “But they’re not good at making comparisons among multiple drug classes in a diverse group of patients that you would encounter in the real world.”

With the new study, Hripcsak believes that “we have found a way to fill in the gaps left by randomized, controlled trials.

Two cardiologists who weren’t involved in the new study took different stances on the results — suggesting that debate on this topic is far from over.

Dr. Satjit Bhusri said the study “is statistically very powerful and can have profound changes in medical practice.” But he added that decisions around which anti-hypertensive drug to choose should still be made on a case-by-case basis.

“I would suggest that the choice of first-line blood pressure therapy be specific to the patient, especially in those with heart disease or at an elevated risk of heart disease.,” Bhusri advised. But, for patients “treated for high blood pressure without an elevated cardiac risk, thiazide medication should be the first-line [choice],” he said.

However, cardiologist Dr. Benjamin Hirsh took issue with the Columbia study’s methodology.

The researchers’ conclusion that “use of thiazide diuretics over ACE inhibitors causes ‘15% fewer cardiovascular effects’ is a conclusion that is highly subject to bias,” he noted.

“ACE Inhibitors are used to treat patients with higher cardiovascular risk, such as those with advanced heart failure and kidney disease,” Hirsh explained.”So, these patients are at higher risk for heart disease in general.”

According to Hirsh, it stands to reason that patients on ACE inhibitors would have worse outcomes than those on thiazide diuretics, because they were sicker to begin with.

And he noted that “thiazide diuretics also must be used carefully with other drugs.” Those include newer diabetes medications such as Jardiance, because the concurrent use of a thiazide diuretic might trigger too-low blood pressure, Hirsh explained.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Satjit Bhusri, M.D., cardiologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Benjamin Hirsh, M.D., director, preventive cardiology, Northwell Health Sandra Atlas Bass Heart Hospital, Manhasset; NY; Columbia University, news release, Oct. 24, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Antibiotics Not Recommended for Most Toothaches, New Guideline Says

FRIDAY, Oct. 25, 2019 — Antibiotics aren’t necessary for most toothaches, a new American Dental Association (ADA) guideline says.

It’s common for doctors and dentists to prescribe antibiotics to ease toothache symptoms and prevent a more serious condition.

But a review that led to the new guideline concluded that antibiotics are not the best option for adults with a toothache. Instead, they should get dental treatment and, if needed, use over-the-counter pain relievers such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), according to the ADA.

“Antibiotics are, of course, tremendously important medications,” said Dr. Peter Lockhart, chairman of the expert panel that developed the new guideline. “However, it’s vital that we use them wisely so that they continue to be effective when absolutely needed.”

Lockhart is chairman of the department of oral medicine at Carolinas Medical Center–Atrium Health in the Charlotte metro area.

Antibiotics are designed to combat bacterial infections, but they don’t necessarily help with a toothache. They can cause serious side effects, and overuse has resulted in bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics.

The guideline does provide examples when antibiotics may be prescribed for a toothache.

“When dental treatment is not immediately available and the patient has signs and symptoms such as fever, swollen lymph nodes, or extreme tiredness, antibiotics may need to be prescribed,” Lockhart said in an ADA news release. “But in most cases when adults have a toothache and access to dental treatment, antibiotics may actually do more harm than good.”

The new guideline appears in the November issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more on toothaches.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: October 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

FDA Approves New Drug for Most Common Form of Cystic Fibrosis

By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Oct. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) — A new drug to treat most cystic fibrosis patients has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Trikafta (elexacaftor/ivacaftor/tezacaftor) is the first triple combination therapy available to treat patients with the most common cystic fibrosis mutation. Its list price is $ 311,000 a year, same as one of the maker’s earlier treatments for the genetic disease.

Trikafta is approved for patients aged 12 and older who have at least one F508del mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. This includes about 90% of cystic fibrosis patients, or about 27,000 people in the United States, according to the FDA.

There are about 2,000 known mutations of the CFTR gene, but the F508del mutation is the most common. Cystic fibrosis is the result of a defective protein caused by the gene mutation.

Current drugs that target the defective protein can be used to treat some patients, but many patients have mutations that don’t respond to those treatments, the FDA said.

Trikafta — from Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Inc. — is a combo of three drugs. It helps the defective protein made by the CFTR mutation function more effectively.

Trikafta’s approval is based on results of two clinical trials involving 510 patients.

The trials assessed a measure of lung function called percent predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (ppFEV1). It measures how much air a person can exhale during a forced breath.

In one trial, average ppFEV1 among patients who took Trikafta improved 13.8% compared to those who took a placebo. In the second trial, the drug increased average ppFEV1 by 10% compared to the drugs tezacaftor/ivacaftor.

Acting FDA Commissioner Dr. Ned Sharpless said the approval was an outgrowth of efforts to speed development of new therapies for complex diseases.

Trikafta’s approval makes a new “treatment available to most cystic fibrosis patients, including adolescents, who previously had no options and giving others in the cystic fibrosis community access to an additional effective therapy,” he said in an agency news release.

Cystic fibrosis is a progressive, life-threatening disease. It causes formation of thick mucus that builds up in the lungs, digestive tract and other parts of the body, resulting in severe respiratory and digestive problems and other complications, such as infections and diabetes.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, news release, Oct. 21, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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What Foods Are Most Likely to Cause Acne Breakouts?

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 — Certain eating habits, high levels of stress and exposure to pollution are among the greatest factors associated with acne, researchers say.

They studied links to acne in more than 6,700 people from six countries in Europe and the Americas. The analysis showed that many more people with acne consume dairy products each day than those without acne — 48.2% versus 38.8%.

The same was true for soda, juices or syrups (35.6% versus 31%); pastries and chocolate (37% versus 27.8%); as well as other sweets (29.7% versus 19.1%).

The study also found that 11% of acne sufferers consume whey proteins compared to 7% of those without acne. And 11.9% of acne sufferers use anabolic steroids versus 3.2% of others.

Exposure to pollution and stress was also more common among people with acne, and they were also more likely to use harsh skin care practices.

The findings reflected an association with acne, but not a cause-and-effect link. The study was scheduled to be presented Saturday at a meeting of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV), in Madrid.

Lead author Dr. Brigitte Dreno, head of dermatology at University Hospital of Nantes in France, noted that acne is one of the most common reasons people see a dermatologist.

“Its severity and response to treatment may be influenced by internal and external factors, which we call the exposome,” Dreno said in a meeting news release. “For the first time, this study allows us to identify the most important exposome factors relating to acne from patient questioning prior to any treatment prescription.”

Previous research has suggested that tobacco use is an acne trigger, but this study did not link tobacco with acne.

Acne affects about 1 in 10 people worldwide, and as many as 40% of adult women.

“Understanding, identifying and reducing the impact of exposome is important for an adequate acne disease management as it may impact on the course and severity of acne as well as on treatment efficacy,” said Dreno, who is also chair of the meeting’s Scientific Programming Committee.

Research presented at meetings is typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on acne.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: October 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Is Your State One of the ‘Most Obese’ in America?

By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The number of U.S. states with adult obesity rates above 35% reached an all-time high of nine in 2018, a new report says.

In 2018, the nine states with adult obesity rates above 35% were: Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota and West Virginia.

That’s two more than the year before. As recently as 2012, no state topped 35%, according to the report. It also pointed to statistically significant increases in adult obesity rates in 33 states between 2013 and 2018.

“These latest data shout that our national obesity crisis is getting worse,” said John Auerbach, president and CEO of the Trust for America’s Health (TFAH), the nonprofit group behind the 16th annual “State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America” report.

The report showed considerable variation from state to state. The five with the highest rates were Mississippi and West Virginia (39.5%), Arkansas (37.1%), Louisiana (36.8%) and Kentucky (36.6%).

The lowest obesity rates were in Colorado (23%), District of Columbia (24.7%), Hawaii (24.9%), and Massachusetts and New Jersey (25.7%).

“Almost 50 years into the upward curve of obesity rates we haven’t yet found the right mix of programs to stop the epidemic,” Auerbach said in a TFAH news release.

“Isolated programs and calls for lifestyle changes aren’t enough. Instead, our report highlights the fundamental changes that are needed in the social and economic conditions that make it challenging for people to eat healthy foods and get sufficient exercise,” he added.

Obesity increases the risk of serious health problems, such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke and many cancers.

It also increases U.S. health care spending by an estimated $ 149 million a year — about half of which is paid for by Medicare and Medicaid. And excess weight is the most common reason young adults are ineligible for military service, according to TFAH.

Those at greatest risk for obesity include people with lower incomes and people of color. They are more likely to live in areas where healthy food is hard to find, opportunities for physical activity are scarce and marketing of unhealthy foods is widespread, the report said.

Continued

Among adults, the latest data show that as of 2015-2016, about 47% of Hispanic and black Americans were obese, compared with about 38% of whites and nearly 13% of Asians.

Childhood obesity rates were highest among Hispanics (25.8%) and blacks (22%), compared with 14% of whites and 11% of Asians, the findings showed.

The report includes 31 recommendations for policy action by federal, state and local governments to improve access to nutritious foods, provide safe opportunities for physical activity, and limit harmful food marketing and advertising tactics.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: Trust for America’s Health, news release, Sept. 12, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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FDA Approves Drug for Most Deadly Form of TB

By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Aug. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) — A new drug has been approved as part of a powerful, three-pronged treatment regimen for the most deadly strain of tuberculosis, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday.

Pretomanid tablets were approved to be used with bedaquiline and linezolid in adults with extensive multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) of the lungs. Caused by a bacterium that attacks the lungs, TB can also wreak havoc on any part of the body including the kidney, spine and brain.

The FDA approval sprang from a groundbreaking trial of 107 patients in South Africa who had been diagnosed with XDR-TB. Six months after treatment, 89% of the patients were cured, which is far higher than typical success rates for treatment of this often lethal strain of TB, according to the FDA.

Tsholofelo Msimango was one of the patients in the South African trial. Sent off to a hospital in Johannesburg to participate in the trial, she weighed only 57 pounds at the time and was terrified.

“I cried the whole way in the ambulance,” Msimango told The New York Times recently. “They told my parents to fix the insurance because I would die.”

Instead, Msimango, now 25, is TB-free five years after her diagnosis. She weighs a healthy 103 pounds, and has since had a young son.

That’s not to say the new regimen wasn’t tough to take. Significant side effects were experienced by patients in the trial. They included nerve damage, acne, anemia, nausea, vomiting, headache, increased liver enzymes, indigestion, rash, increased pancreatic enzymes, visual impairment, low blood sugar and diarrhea.

But the disease is far worse than the side effects of treatment.

TB is now the leading cause of infectious deaths worldwide, according to the Times. While only a fraction of the 10 million people who get TB get this deadly strain, very few of the 30,000 people in 100 countries who get XDR-TB survive, the newspaper said. Three-quarters die before there is even a diagnosis, experts believe. And among those who get typical treatment, the cure rate is only 34% because the XDR strain is resistant to all four families of antibiotics typically used to fight the disease, the newspaper reported.

Continued

“The threat of antimicrobial-resistant infections is a key challenge we face as a public health agency,” FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner Dr. Amy Abernethy said in an agency news release.

“The bacterium that causes tuberculosis can develop resistance to the antibiotics used to treat it. Multidrug-resistant TB and extensively drug-resistant TB are public health threats due to limited treatment options. New treatments are important to meet patient national and global health needs,” Abernethy said.

The approval of pretomanid was granted to the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development (TB Alliance).

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, news release, Aug. 14, 2019;The New York Times

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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But most teens have never sent or received a sex text, the new study found. It focused on about 5,600 students in American middle and high schools, ages 12 to 17.

By Kayla McKiski
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, July 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Parents of budding teens can breathe a little easier: A new study says adolescent “sexting” is not an epidemic.

On the other hand, it’s not disappearing, either, despite campaigns to curb it.

“Sexting is perceived as an epidemic because the news highlights extreme cases that involve tragic outcomes, and because it goes against standards of morality and decency that are historically entrenched,” said study author Sameer Hinduja, a professor of criminology at Florida Atlantic University.

But most teens have never sent or received a sex text, the new study found. It focused on about 5,600 students in American middle and high schools, ages 12 to 17.

Of those, about 14% had ever sent a sexually or explicit image or had received one.

For this study, researchers defined sexting as the exchange of nude or semi-nude photos or videos via text or private messaging on social media.

Other researchers have included sexually suggestive or explicit texts. Hinduja said his team didn’t include those, because they can’t lead to sextortion, child pornography charges or related fallout.

About 11% of the students said they had sent a sext to a boyfriend or girlfriend — and about 64% did so when asked to, the study found. But only 43% complied with a request from someone who was not a current romantic partner.

Boys were much more likely to have sent and received a sext from a current partner, but boys and girls were equally likely to receive them from others.

About 4% said they had shared an explicit image sent to them with someone else, without permission — and about as many suspected this had happened to them.

Hinduja said though dishonest responses were removed from the findings, “it is possible that the frequency of sexting among middle schoolers and high schoolers across the United States may be underrepresented in our research.”

While teen sexting is not rampant, the numbers have remained steady over the years, prompting many to question the effectiveness of campaigns to prevent it.

Continued

“Teens sext for a variety of reasons — the most popular are sexual exploration, fun, flirtation and to communicate sexual intent,” said Michelle Drouin, a psychology professor at Purdue University-Fort Wayne in Indianapolis. “In some ways it is part of sexual exploration in a digital age. Many teens do it — it’s not a ‘bad kid’ issue.”

Nonetheless, sexting has been linked to psychological trauma among adolescents.

“The young adults I survey sometimes feel distress about the nude or nearly nude photos they have sent,” said Drouin, who wasn’t involved with the study. “I think the only way to curb teen sexting is through targeted education. Sexting should definitely be a standard component of sex education.”

Hinduja said efforts to discourage sexting should not aim to stifle sexual development. Instead, they should focus on the seriousness of potential consequences — legal, financial, reputational, social or otherwise, he said.

For future research, his team is interested in exploring the best ways to deter teens from sexting.

“Are there any messages that resonate more powerfully so that they second-guess taking and sending a nude?” Hinduja said. “Do the consequences they hear about concern them at all? Do they have an invincibility complex about these sorts of things?”

In the meantime, letting teens know that a relatively small proportion of their peers engage in sexting may be a deterrent, he said.

“It underscores that it is not as normal, commonplace, or widespread as they might believe,” Hinduja said in a Florida Atlantic University news release.

The study was published recently in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior. It was co-authored by Justin Patchin, a professor of criminal justice at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.

Patchin and Hinduja are co-directors of the Cyberbullying Research Center.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Sameer Hinduja, Ph.D., professor of criminology and criminal justice and co-director of the Cyberbullying Research Center, Florida Atlantic University, Jupiter; Michelle Drouin, Ph.D., professor, psychology, Purdue University-Fort Wayne, Indianapolis, and senior research scientist, Parkview Research Center, Fort Wayne;Archives of Sexual Behavior, July 15, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

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WebMD Health

Most Americans Have Never Had an HIV Test: CDC

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Fewer than 4 in 10 Americans have ever heeded federal government recommendations to be tested for HIV, health officials reported Thursday.

“Getting tested for HIV is quicker and easier than ever before — and when you take the test, you take control,” said Dr. Eugene McCray, director of the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The agency encourages everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 to get an HIV test at least once as part of their routine health care.

Instead, the latest CDC survey found that:

  • Less than 40% of Americans have ever had an HIV test.
  • Less than 30% of those most at risk for HIV were tested in the last year.
  • In 50 places where more than 50% of HIV diagnoses occur, less than 35% of those who should be tested annually were tested in the past year.
  • Only 26% of those in rural areas where annual HIV testing is recommended were tested in the past year.

Those who should get an HIV test each year include:

  • Sexually active gay and bisexual men
  • Drug abusers
  • People with multiple sex partners since their last test
  • People who have other sexually transmitted diseases, hepatitis or tuberculosis.

“Diagnosis and treatment are the first steps toward affording individuals living with HIV a normal life expectancy,” CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield said in an agency news release.

“As we encourage those at risk for HIV to seek care, we need to meet them in their journey. This means clearing the path of stigma, finding more comfortable ways of delivering health services, as well as learning from individuals already in treatment so the journey becomes easier for others who follow,” he added.

Regardless of whether the test is positive or negative, it will help you take control of your health, the CDC said.

People whose test is negative can help prevent getting HIV by taking pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), in a single daily pill.

A positive test can lead to treatment that can reduce the amount of the virus in your body, extending your life and lowering the risk of passing HIV to others, the CDC said.

The report was published June 28 in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, June 27, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

What’s The Most Effective Way to Tone Your Biceps?

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 — The biceps, the very visible muscles in the front of the upper arms, are a target in every comprehensive strength-training regimen, but what exercise is the most effective?

To answer that question, the American Council on Exercise asked scientists from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse to evaluate eight popular biceps exercises.

Popular Biceps Strength-Training Exercises

  • Barbell curl
  • Cable curl
  • Chin-up
  • Concentration curl
  • EZ curl with wide grip
  • EZ curl with narrow grip
  • Incline curl
  • Preacher curl

At the very top of the list for effectiveness is the concentration curl, because it best isolates the biceps. Most of the other popular exercises also target other muscles, such as those in the shoulder called deltoids. But because the upper arm is pressed against the leg in concentration curls, the biceps is engaged the most.

To do this curl, sit on a flat bench with a dumbbell in front of you. Legs are apart, knees bent and feet flat on the floor. For the starting position, hold the weight in your right arm, arm extended toward the floor, palm up. Press the back of the upper arm against the top of your inner right thigh. Now, with control, use only your forearm to curl the weight toward your biceps as you contract that muscle. Bring the weight up to shoulder level, leading with the outside of your hand rather than your thumb for a better contraction. Hold briefly, then — always with control — lower the weight to the start position, and repeat. Build up to three sets of 12 to 15 reps each. Once you’ve finished all the sets with your right hand, repeat with the left.

If you’d like to add more biceps exercises to your routine, the next two in order of effectiveness are the cable curl and chin-ups, with the rest of those on the list very close behind.

More information

The American Council on Exercise has a vast library of biceps exercises on its website.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: June 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Who’s Most Likely to Miss School Due to Eczema?

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 — Hispanic and black children are more likely to miss school than white children due to the chronic skin condition eczema, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed more than a decade of data on more than 8,000 2- to 17-year-olds enrolled in a national eczema registry. Overall, 3.3% missed six or more days of school over a six-month period.

That meets the U.S. Department of Education’s definition of chronic school absenteeism.

Compared to white children, Hispanic children were 3.4 times more likely to be chronically absent due to eczema, and black children 1.5 times more likely, according to the study published online May 22 in the journal JAMA Dermatology.

“The effects of eczema are more than skin-deep, and studies have shown that the mental health and social impact of this condition can be significant — sometimes just as much or more than the physical,” said lead author Dr. Joy Wan. She’s a postdoctoral fellow and instructor in dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Eczema, also called atopic dermatitis, is a common inflammatory disease that causes red and itchy skin. It affects about 30 million Americans, including up to 20% of children, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The condition is more common among black and Hispanic children than among white children.

Along with the physical symptoms, eczema can have mental health impacts as well, including increased risk of anxiety and depression.

“Most people don’t realize the serious impact eczema can have on a person’s life, and our research shows minorities may be disproportionately affected,” study senior author Dr. Junko Takeshita said in a university news release. She is an assistant professor of dermatology and epidemiology.

“We still have a lot to learn about eczema-related disparities but it’s becoming increasingly clear that these disparities need to be addressed,” Takeshita said.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on eczema.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: May 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Most States Restrict Pregnant Women’s Advance Directives: Study

FRIDAY, April 26, 2019 — Laws in half of U.S. states override a pregnant woman’s advance directive if she becomes incapacitated, a new study finds.

And most of those states don’t reveal this in advance directive forms.

An advance directive is a legal document completed by a patient that appoints a surrogate to make health care decisions if the patient becomes unable to do so. It also outlines the person’s health care preferences.

For the new study, Mayo Clinic researchers reviewed advance directive laws in all 50 states and the District of Columbia as of February 2019. The findings showed that 38 states have laws that define pregnancy as a condition that affects decisions for incapacitated pregnant women.

Eight of those states ask for a woman’s pregnancy-specific care preferences. The other 30 limit a woman’s or her surrogate’s decision about withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment. And 25 of those invalidate a woman’s advance directive during pregnancy.

Twelve of the states that forbid withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment require it to continue until the woman’s fetus can be safely delivered, no matter the stage of pregnancy when the mother became ill or injured, the investigators found.

Those states are Alabama, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wisconsin.

The study was published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

“Advance directives were designed by lawmakers to safeguard patient autonomy and control over medical circumstances that are difficult to anticipate but that may lead to life-and-death decisions,” said lead author Dr. Erin DeMartino. She’s a pulmonary and critical care doctor at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

“It would come as a great surprise to many people that there’s a medical condition in which women’s control of their own health destiny is taken away by the state,” DeMartino added in a Mayo Clinic news release.

Ethics and health law in the United States put a premium on a patient’s treatment preferences, according to the study authors.

“This analysis suggests that a majority of U.S. states restrict the health care options available to decisionally incapacitated women during pregnancy, and do not disclose these restrictions in advance directive forms,” the researchers wrote.

The new study suggests that states need to do a better job informing women how pregnancy affects medical decision-making, DeMartino said.

“It’s of fundamental importance that women understand what they’re signing, and that we are aware of how these types of health care decisions are being influenced by state law,” she added.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on advance directives.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: April 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Ask a Stoner: What’s the Most F*cked Up Thing You’ve Eaten While High?

Dear Stoner: I just cooked eggs, an old enchilada and some barbecue sauce together in a skillet. Not bad. What’s the most fucked-up thing you’ve made while high?
Chef Clutch

Dear Chef: A lot of popular Mexican food works well with eggs, so I’m not giving you weird points for that one, but I like where your head’s at. Sadly, I don’t get much crazier than blending up various baked goods (pie, cheesecake, baklava, etc.) with ice cream and milk for a shake, or taking two waffles, buttering them and making a grilled peanut butter and jelly sandwich. But that’s much harder on my arteries than my tastebuds.

Ask a Stoner: What's the Most F*cked Up Thing You've Eaten While High?

Continue Reading

I’ve heard stories of re-creating the horrendous dessert spaghetti from Elf , throwing Kung Pao chicken on top of a baked potato, and mixing apples into mac and cheese (I might actually try that one). However, most of us forget these concoctions as fast as we create them.

Stoner tip: Crush Pizza & Tap will make you a “4/20 pizza,” topping it with whatever the kitchen feels like at the time, whether that’s cheeseburger sliders or chicken cordon bleu.

Send questions to marijuana@westword.com.


Toke of the Town

Ask a Stoner: Which Pot Industry Jobs Pay the Most?

Dear Stoner: I want to get in the weed industry, but I don’t want to make minimum wage for very long. Which positions should I go after?
Denny

Dear Denny: Obviously, your immediate earning potential and career trajectory will depend on your experience around the plant. If you have any cannabis cultivation, extraction or retail management experience, that’ll help you move up the food chain quickly if you want to cash in as a lead grower, extractor or dispensary manager. According to cannabis recruiting firm Vangst, pot cultivation directors earn around $ 88,000 on average and as much as $ 250,000, while lead hash extractors earn an average of $ 72,000, topping out at just over $ 190,000. But those aren’t the only opportunities for big bucks from big buds.

Employees for Incredibles package cannabis concentrates.EXPAND

Employees for Incredibles package cannabis concentrates.

Jacqueline Collins

Continue Reading

Marijuana Deals Near You

Cannabis businesses, especially the bigger players, have a need for professionals in tech and software, regulatory compliance, sales, marketing and other traditional professions that now apply to a unique industry. All of these roles are essential for a cannabis company to be taken seriously and can lead you on a path toward a six-figure salary, too.

If you really want to hit it big, though, you’re going to have to start your own company — or become a large investor in one, at least. It’s hard to get rich working for someone else.

Send questions to marijuana@westword.com.


Toke of the Town

After Opioid OD, Most Patients Can Leave Hospital in an Hour