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Climate Change Will Hurt Kids Most, Report Warns

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 — Children will face more food shortages and infections if climate change continues unchecked, researchers from the World Health Organization and 34 other institutions warn.

Climate change is already harming children’s health. And they’re at risk for lifelong health threats unless the world meets Paris Agreement targets to limit warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius, the scientists reported in the Nov. 14 issue of The Lancet.

“This year, the accelerating impacts of climate change have become clearer than ever,” said Hugh Montgomery, co-chair of The Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change.

“The highest recorded temperatures in Western Europe and wildfires in Siberia, Queensland and California triggered asthma, respiratory infections and heat stroke. Sea levels are now rising at an ever-concerning rate. Our children recognize this climate emergency and demand action to protect them. We must listen, and respond,” Montgomery said in a journal news release.

Montgomery is director of University College London’s Institute for Human Health and Performance, in the United Kingdom.

The health impact of climate change needs to be at the top of the agenda at the UN Climate Conference (COP25) next month in Madrid, the scientists urged.

Without action, children born today will live in a world that’s an average of more than 4 degrees Celsius warmer by age 71, posing a risk to their health at every stage of their lives, the report stated.

These children will face rising food prices and increased risk of malnutrition, according to the scientists. They noted there have been declines in average global yield potential of maize (?4%), winter wheat (?6%), soybean (?3%) and rice (?4%) over the past 30 years.

Children will also be at high risk from the climate change-related rise in infectious diseases. Last year was “the second most climatically suitable year on record” for the spread of bacteria that cause many cases of diarrhea and wound infection cases worldwide, the researchers noted.

Also, as kids born today progress through their teens, the health harms of air pollution will worsen. And as they move into adulthood, extreme weather events, such as heatwaves and wildfires, will intensify.

Meeting the Paris Agreement target to limit warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius could allow a child born today to grow up in a world that reaches net-zero emissions by age 31 and to provide a healthier future for coming generations, according to the report.

The journal’s Countdown on Health and Climate Change is a yearly analysis of what action to meet the Paris Agreement targets — or inaction — means for human health. The project is a collaboration among 120 experts from 35 institutions.

According to Dr. Nick Watts, executive director of The Lancet Countdown, “Children are particularly vulnerable to the health risks of a changing climate. Their bodies and immune systems are still developing, leaving them more susceptible to disease and environmental pollutants. The damage done in early childhood is persistent and pervasive, with health consequences lasting for a lifetime.”

Watts said, “Without immediate action from all countries to cut greenhouse gas emissions, gains in well-being and life expectancy will be compromised, and climate change will come to define the health of an entire generation.”

More information

The World Health Organization has more on climate change and health.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: November 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Fewer Americans Have Health Insurance: Report

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 — The percentage of Americans living in poverty declined in 2018, but the rate of those without health insurance increased, according to a Census Bureau report.

It found that 11.8% of people lived in poverty last year, the lowest level since 2001. Median household income in 2018 was $ 63,200, essentially the same as 2017 after adjusting for inflation, The New York Times reported.

Meanwhile, about 27.5 million people (8.5% of the population) lacked health insurance for all of 2018, up from 7.9% in 2017, which was the first increase since the Affordable Care Act took full effect in 2014.

That increase was at least partly due to the Trump administration’s efforts to undermine that law, according to experts.

“In a period of continued economic growth, continued job growth, you would certainly hope that you wouldn’t be going backwards when it comes to insurance coverage,” Sharon Parrott, senior vice president of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, told The Times.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

Residents, Leaders ‘Shocked’ by Toxic Air Report

This story is jointly reported by Brenda Goodman of WebMD and Andy Miller of Georgia Health News.

July 23, 2019 — Local residents and their elected officials in metro Atlanta are responding with concern after learning that a cancer-causing gas could be drifting through the air near their homes, schools, and workplaces.

On Friday, WebMD and Georgia Health News revealed that Georgia had three census tracts the EPA identified as having higher cancer risks because of a toxic gas called ethylene oxide. All of the census tracts are in metro Atlanta: Two are in the Smyrna area west of the city, and one in Covington, east of Atlanta.

In Smyrna, the plant that releases ethylene oxide is called Sterigenics. In Covington, the plant is known as BD, formerly Bard. Nationally, 109 census tracts are at risk for greater cases of cancer largely due to exposure to ethylene oxide, a chemical used to sterilize medical equipment and make other kinds of products like antifreeze.

On various social media platforms, residents and public officials shared their concerns and questions. Many of their comments centered on the fact that the EPA did little to publicize what it found out about the cancer dangers.

Local governments in Smyrna and Covington posted statements to their websites to reassure residents that although they were also learning about the problem for the first time, they were starting to work on it.

“I am incredibly shocked, terrified, and enraged to learn about this plant,” said one woman who posted to the public Stop Sterigenics Facebook page. Stop Sterigenics is a group of citizens from Willowbrook, IL, which is home to a separate Sterigenics location. They organized last August after learning of the ethylene oxide pollution and higher cancer risk in their own community.

Stop Sterigenics posted a new welcome message Monday for Atlanta-area members who were just joining.

“So many questions,” said one man who posted on the Facebook page for the Newton Citizen, the local newspaper in Covington, which posted the story as a media partner of Georgia Health News. “So the EPA produces a list of 109 census tracts where airborne toxins have elevated the cancer risk (useful!) but then does … nothing with it?” Not useful!” he wrote, “What else don’t we know?”

In the Smyrna area, citizens were preparing a public meeting for 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Atlanta Freethought Society on North Church Lane.

Tony Adams, a Smyrna area resident who is helping to organize the meeting, called the response from the community “overwhelming” on the neighborhood’s Nextdoor online group.

“We want to know that if there’s a human carcinogen being emitted, how much of it is being emitted? And what are the long-term effects?” Adams said.

“We want to be involved, and we want to know the next step. We need to be organized,” he said.

Karen Hays, Air Protection Branch chief for the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD), responded to the article in the Marietta Daily Journal, which posted the story as a media partner of Georgia Health News.

“I think the story was trying to make people concerned, not trying to give the whole picture,” she said.

In Covington, City Council members discussed the revelations about the ethylene oxide pollution Monday night in a regularly scheduled meeting.

Council Member Anthony Henderson took issue with the EPD’s position. “I just think that unfortunately, the EPD thinks that the numbers are not really resulting in affecting people or really trying to get the people’s side of the view of it,” he said. “One life is too many or too much to sacrifice in a situation like that. Myself, the City Council, and the city will do everything that we can do to see that the situation is resolved,” he said, according to the Newton Citizen.

Georgia state Sen. Jen Jordan, a Democrat who represents the Smyrna area, said she had spoken to Philip MacNabb, the president of Sterigenics, on Tuesday. He said the company would be submitting an application to the EPD within 2 weeks to install new pollution control technology at its Cobb County plant. The EPD would have to approve the application.

Georgia state Rep. Erick Allen, a Democrat who represents District 40 in Smyrna, wrote on Facebook that he hoped Sterigenics would work to make its operations safer without waiting to be sued, as it was in Illinois.

“We deserve better, and I will demand better,” he wrote. “I have been in touch with other local, state, and federal elected officials and their offices, and we are committed to seeing this through to resolution. Please continue to post, email, and call as we work through this together as a community.”

The city of Smyrna posted a brief statement on its website Monday to let local residents know that although the Sterigenics plant sits outside of its official jurisdiction, “We are now aware and part of a larger set of local and state voices working to address this alarming news and circumstance.”

The City of Covington also issued a brief statement.

“Know that the safety of our citizens is our highest priority. We have briefly spoken with our state representatives, officials from the EPA and BD, and are awaiting further detail from them. As more information is gathered, the city will take appropriate action as necessary to protect our citizens.”

Sources

Tony Adams, resident, Cobb County, GA.

Statement, city of Smyrna, July 22, 2019.

Statement, City of Covington, July 23, 2019

Jen Jordan, Georgia state senator, District 6, Smyrna, GA.

Anthony Henderson, City Council member, Covington, GA.

Karen Hays, Air Protection Branch chief, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division, Atlanta.

Marietta Daily Journal: “Local Lawmakers React to Report of Cancer-Causing Emissions Near Smyrna.”

WebMD and Georgia Health News: “Residents Unaware of Cancer-Causing Toxin in Air.”

Newton Citizen: “Residents upset after learning cancer-causing toxin released by local company.”

© 2019 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Brain Zoo Studios Working on Animated Mueller Report

L.A.-based Brain Zoo Studios and Julian August Productions are working on The Mueller Report: An Animated Series. The topical animated TV series hopes to make the report’s findings more accessible to the public. In the coming weeks, the partnership will launch a crowd-funding campaign through Kickstarter.

“Erick and I have received much positive feedback on the project. The report is a long legal document, and people have busy lives. We believe combining education and entertainment is the best way to communicate what is in the report to the general public.” said, Mo Davoudian, the Emmy-winning producer at Brain Zoo Studios and Julian August Productions.

“Mo and I feel it’s our patriotic duty to make this series and we believe everyone needs to know what is in the report. We have found others who feel this project is important, including Emmy-nominated voice actor John Di Domenico who will be the voice of Trump.” said, Erick Armelin producer at Brain Zoo Studios and Julian August Productions.

Actor John Di Domenico has been seen and heard as Trump since 2004 on
television, feature films, podcasts, web series, apps, games and hundreds of live shows around the world. For more info visit www.brainzoostudios.com

The Mueller Report: An Animated Series

The Mueller Report: An Animated Series

Animation Magazine

Report: Hundreds of Kids Drown in Pools Each Year

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, June 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Summer at the nation’s swimming pools and hot tubs means fun for kids, but danger, too.

The latest national data, for 2016, finds 389 U.S. youngsters under the age of 15 drowned in pools and hot tubs that year.

Most of the deaths (74%) involved children under age 5, the researchers found.

The new report “indicates a spike in drowning incidents among all children younger than 15,” noted Nikki Fleming, who is leader of the Pool Safely campaign, sponsored by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

“These numbers demonstrate that drowning remains the leading cause of unintentional death among children ages 1-4, and the second leading cause of death among children ages 5-14.” Fleming warned.

Although the months of May through August are peak time for drownings, the month of June is the most dangerous month of the year for kids losing their lives in this way, Fleming said. About three-quarters of all drownings in pools or spas (such as hot tubs and Jacuzzis) happen at home.

In addition to drownings, the years 2016 through 2018 saw about 6,600 emergency room visits related to pool or spa injuries annually.

And the CPSC highlighted one particular pool hazard: “suction entrapment.” That’s when children become trapped on a suction outlet cover in a public pool or spa. In the past, dozens of children drowned each year after becoming entangled in pool drains.

Luckily, there’s good news to report on these incidents: “Since the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act went into effect in December 2008, there have been no reported fatalities involving a child being entrapped on a suction outlet cover in a public pool or spa,” Fleming noted.

That safety legislation was named after Virginia Graeme Baker, the granddaughter of former U.S. Secretary of State James Baker. She died at the age of 7 in a pool suction entrapment accident in 2002.

The Act mandates that pools now have specially designed drain covers and other devices aimed at preventing suction entrapments.

Dr. Robert Glatter is an emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. He offered the following tips to parents on how to keep children water-safe this summer:

  • Have kids learn to swim. “Taking swimming lessons at a young age is one of the most important measures to safeguard against potential drowning,” Glatter said. Lessons can begin as early as the age of 1, and should include “water competency” skills associated with getting out of the water if a child falls in unexpectedly.
  • At pools or beaches, give kids your “undivided attention.” “This means putting your smartphone away,” Glatter said, because even a few moments of distraction while children are in shallow water — even under a few inches — could prove lethal.
  • Stay close. If infants or young children are in the water, an adult who can swim should always be nearby, ideally within an arm’s length of the child.
  • Make home pools or spas “child-safe.” For home pools, this “must include a four-sided fence (at least 4 feet high) with a lock that completely surrounds and isolates the pool,” Glatter explained. “A ‘pool alarm’ may also be helpful, signaling when someone has entered the water.”

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Robert Glatter, M.D., emergency physician, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; June 7, 2019, news release, U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

LED Blue Light Poses Eye, Sleep Risks: Report

May 17, 2019 — The blue light in LED lighting used in many consumer products may harm your sleep and pose a risk to your eyes, a new report warns.

Specifically, there is new evidence that this type of light can disturb biological and sleep rhythms and damage the eye‘s retina, according to the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety.

Products with LEDs that produce blue light include the newest flashlights, car headlights and some toys, CNN reported.

The maximum limit on short-term exposure to blue light should be reduced, only low-risk LED devices should be available to consumers, and the luminosity of car headlights should be reduced, the French agency recommended.

It also said that eye protection provided by “anti-blue light” screens, filters and sunglasses varies, and there is no proof that those help preserve sleep rhythms, CNN reported.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

Report: Marijuana Use With Your Partner Increases Likelihood of Intimacy

I’ve used every trick in the book to get into a woman’s pants.  Of course, at my age there aren’t any tricks that women don’t know of, but speaking from childhood experiences, I can recall many times I was downright lying to try and stimulate myself with whatever girl I was dating.  I wish I had known of the connection that marijuana can have on people, because according to this recent report, using it with your partner can lead to intimacy.  In today’s edition of “why marijuana is so good for us,” I’ll talk about this new information.

Will Using Marijuana Help You Get Laid?

sexUntil recently I couldn’t find much about weed and hooking up, other than some 420 dating websites that connected people who were both interested in smoking flower as a way to have something in common and potentially find love.  (I joined one, and my experience will follow in another update.)

With all of the states in the USA looking to have legalization of marijuana, there have been many studies coming out on everything from CBD products, to hemp usage, to smoking marijuana.  I encourage this, not only because it gives me daily fodder for the 420 Times magazine, but it also help society know what we’ve been missing out on all these years by shunning such a powerful, medicinal product.  With scientists digging deeper into the effects of Cannabis, we’re learning stuff we should have known ions ago.

Also Read:  Could Cannabis Users Benefit from Taking CBD?

According to a study that was published in the journal Cannabis, when you use marijuana as couples in situations it can lead to positive experiences.  A study surveyed 183 couples who either lived together or were married, who were heavy weed users, and they requested that they track their use for a month.  Every time they used cannabis, they tracked it on a smartphone and filled out a brief report.

Every morning they also reported on if they had either an interaction or a deep convo about love on the prior day.  If they did, they recorded the time as well.

This reporting gave the research comittee data to compile reports on when the couple had used marijuana and when they went through acts of love.

The results of this study showed that within two hours of use, the likelihood of intimacy increased.

So it’s that simple, use weed and you’ll get more action with your partner.  I’m down for that.

The study also found that it was more likely that this would happen (love and intimacy) if only one person was using, compared to none of them using marijuana.

I’m always down with reports that are positive to society.  Although the original article did point out that this may not be the case if someone is a problematic user, I think that’s something we all know by now.  Everyone knows the guy who is perma-stoned isn’t really the guy who is shucking and jiving with his lady friend.

My next obvious question to this study is:  are they going to do this for pets?  I’d like to know if my dogs will be more intimate if they are using CBD oils around the same time?

Things that make you go “HMMMMMM.”

Report: Marijuana Use With Your Partner Increases Likelihood of Intimacy

5 (100%) 1 vote


Shane Dwyer
Author: Shane Dwyer
Shane Dwyer is a cannabis advocate who isn’t afraid to tell the world about it! You can find his views, rants, and tips published regularly at The 420 Times.

Marijuana & Cannabis News – The 420 Times

FDA: Mammographers Must Report Breast Density

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, March 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Women with dense breasts who get mammograms must be told of their higher risk for breast cancer under new rules proposed Wednesday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The FDA would also tighten its regulation of mammogram facilities, giving the agency the power to notify patients if problems are found at a center so that repeat mammograms can be done at another certified center.

“The steps we are announcing today are intended to modernize breast cancer screening and help empower patients with more information when they are considering important decisions regarding their breast health care,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said during a Wednesday morning media briefing.

Not only is dense breast tissue a risk factor for breast cancer, but mammograms can be difficult to interpret because dense tissue can obscure signs of breast cancer, Dr. Amy Abernethy, principal deputy commissioner at the FDA, explained during the briefing.

“For women with dense breasts, they should talk with their health care provider about their high breast density and how it relates to breast cancer risk and their individual situation,” Abernethy said. “Given that more than half of women over the age of 40 in the United States have dense breasts, helping to ensure patient access to information about the impact that breast density and other factors can have on the risk for developing breast cancer is an important part of a comprehensive breast health strategy.”

However, one breast cancer expert noted that many women are already being informed about their breast density.

“The FDA’s proposed amendment is in keeping with the 37 states and District of Columbia, which currently require that patients be informed about breast density,” said Dr. Laurie Margolies, section chief of breast imaging at Mount Sinai Health System, in New York City.

Mammography has been proven to save lives,” Margolies added. “Supplemental screening finds additional cancers in women with negative mammograms. Hopefully, the FDA regulations will mandate [insurance company] payment for supplemental screening so those women who want the extra screening can avail themselves of it.”

Continued

Another breast cancer expert welcomed the proposed rules.

“Mammography is regulated by the federal government as it should be, and the fact that new guidelines and standards are being asked for is a very good thing in my opinion. It is probably overdue,” said Dr. Alice Police, Westchester regional director of breast surgery at Northwell Health Cancer Institute, in Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.

“Improvements in technology have made mammography better, and no patient should be stuck with inferior equipment or techniques,” Police said.

The new rules mark the first time in more than 20 years that the FDA has proposed changes to key regulations for mammography facilities.

Another proposed rule meant to provide more information to health care providers would add three additional categories for the assessments of mammograms, including one called “known biopsy proven malignancy,” which would alert health care providers about cases where cancer being evaluated by mammogram for treatment is already known and identified.

Under the proposed changes, patients and health care providers would also be given more detailed information about the mammography facility they use, the FDA said.

Proposed changes meant to update mammography quality standards and better enable the FDA to enforce regulations and take action against violators include giving the agency the power to “directly notify patients and their health care professionals, should facilities be unwilling or unable to do so, that mammography at a facility did not meet quality standards and that reevaluation or repeat of the mammogram at another certified facility may be needed.”

The proposed changes are available online at www.regulations.gov for public comment for 90 days after publication.

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in American women and the second leading cause of death. About 12.4 percent of women will be diagnosed with breast cancer, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute. It said that in 2018, more than 260,000 women in the U.S. were diagnosed with breast cancer and more than 40,920 women died of the disease.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: March 27, 2019, media briefing with: Scott Gottlieb, M.D., FDA Commissioner, and Amy Abernethy, M.D., FDA principal deputy commissioner; Alice Police, M.D., Westchester regional director, breast surgery, Northwell Health Cancer Institute, Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.;  Laurie Margolies, section chief, breast imaging, Mount Sinai Health System, New York City; U.S. Food and Drug Administration, news release, March 27, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Pagination

WebMD Health

Buyer Beware: Seafood ‘Fraud’ Rampant, Report Says

March 21, 2019 — The next time you order the catch of the day, beware: There’s a good chance you won’t get what your pay for, according to a recent study on seafood fraud.

The conservation group Oceana found that 21% of the fish that researchers sampled from across the United States was not what it was labeled — instead it was less desirable or cheaper fish. Popular and pricey fish like sea bass and snapper had the highest levels of mislabeling — 55% for sea bass and 42% for snapper.

“If the price is too good to be true, you might want to choose something else,” says Kimberly Warner, a senior scientist at Oceana and one of the report’s authors.

Seafood was more frequently mislabeled in restaurants (26%) and at smaller markets (24%) than in large grocery stores (12%).

Warner says 90% of the seafood eaten in the United States is imported, and less than 1% is inspected by the government specifically for fraud. “The government needs more oversite and traceability of our seafood,” she says.

Oceana used DNA to test 400 samples of seafood from more than 250 retail outlets across the United States for the study, released March 7.

Last year, the New York Attorney General’s Office that found more than 1 in 4 samples of seafood bought at supermarket chains in the state were mislabeled.

“Research shows that seafood is mislabeled at all steps of the supply chain, from the time of catching to the import level, processing level, and grocer, retail, and restaurant level,” Warner says.

People are more likely to encounter mislabeled seafood in restaurants, either because a restaurant is unaware that it has purchased mislabeled fish, misidentifies a fish, or has purposely mislabeled it, Warner says.

Not knowing what kind of fish is on your plate can be dangerous to those who are allergic or more sensitive to certain types of seafood.

Warner says “wild” caught fish — purchased at a premium — are often substituted with farm-raised fish, which have higher levels of antibiotics and chemicals. The study also found that some fish was not sustainably caught, as advertised, and so-called locally sourced fish was from another country.

“Seafood is the last wild-caught food we eat. It tends to be pricey. If you’re going to a restaurant and paying top dollar, you want to be getting what you pay for,” she says.

Gavin Gibbons, a spokesman for the National Fisheries Institute, says his organization’s Better Seafood Board works with the restaurant industry to make sure fish are labeled correctly.

“There’s a difference between regulating enough and enforcing enough,” he said. “We have the regulations … we need the FDA to determine where the fraud comes from and go after scofflaws” the way the New York Attorney General’s Office is doing.

The FDA’s most recent report on mislabeled seafood, from 2013, found that seafood labels were accurate 85% of the time. The agency used DNA testing on fish from 14 states.

“It shouldn’t be up to the consumer to test everything they want to buy,” Warner says.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration contracts with seafood processors and distributors to help monitor safety regulations and to evaluate product quality and grading. In 2018, NOAA created the Seafood Import Monitoring Program to track 13 species at high risk of being fraudulently sold or sourced illegally. The Oceana study did not test those species for the recent study; instead, it focused on other species than high-risk.

NOAA’s National Seafood Inspection Laboratory earlier this month rolled out a web-based screening tool that it says will make flagging mislabeled fish easier. The lab also offers what it calls a “rapid detection method” to determine the species of a sample of fish.

John Spink, director of the Food Fraud Initiative at Michigan State University, says he’s found that the seafood industry takes fish fraud very seriously. That’s because if there is a problem — say, someone gets sick from eating mislabeled fish — people might stop buying seafood, and “everybody suffers” in the industry.

“The industry works together, with the private sector forcing standards on the private sector,” he says.

The best way for consumers to protect themselves against fish fraud is to eat at reputable restaurants and shop at reputable grocers, Spink says.

“I’m careful where I buy,” he says.

Matt Olson, fresh program manager at the Independent Natural Food Retailers Association, says his organization works with distributors who can document a fish’s origin.

Honest labeling is essential because it can be hard to tell if something labeled “wild,” like salmon, is actually farm-raised, he says.

“It gets very complicated,” says Olson, who represents more than 200 independently owned grocery stores across the country. “Just with salmon alone, finding out what kind and where it comes from. There are viable farm-raised options, but they need to be labeled,” he says, noting that many species look similar.

Some of the Oceana study findings include:

  • King mackerel, a fish on the FDA’s “Do Not Eat” list for sensitive groups due to high mercury, was sold as grouper in a grocery store in South Florida.
  • Tilefish, also on the “Do Not Eat” list due to high mercury, was sold as halibut and red snapper in a small market in New York City.
  • Overfished Atlantic cod was sold as orange roughy, another unsustainable choice, in Kansas City.
  • Another imperiled fish, Gulf grouper, was sold as more sustainable black grouper in Denver.
  • Every sushi sample in Austin, TX, was mislabeled.

How to Buy Fish:

Warner, Gibbons, and other seafood fraud experts say there are things consumers can do to make sure they buy the fish they order, including:

  • When ordering fish in a restaurant, ask where the fish came from and how it was harvested. If the server doesn’t know, wait for him to ask the chef.
  • Look at the price of the fish. Don’t purchase an expensive fish like sea bass or red snapper if the price seems too good to be true.
  • At a restaurant, ask if fish is sourced from the Better Seafood Board. This means the restaurant is following best practices, just like the Better Business Bureau.
  • If you go to a sushi restaurant and find white tuna on the menu, take your business elsewhere. There is no such fish as white tuna. Instead, it is often escolar, which can cause intestinal issues.
  • If you are committed to buying sustainable fish, take the time to learn what fish are in season in your area.
  • Buy fish from a reputable grocer or restaurant.

Sources

Kimberly Warner, senior scientist, Oceana, Washington, D.C.

Gavin Gibbons, spokesman, National Fisheries Institute, McLean, VA.

John Spink, director, Food Fraud Initiative, Michigan State University, East Lansing.

Matt Olson, fresh program manager, Independent Natural Foods Retailers Association, St. Paul, MN.

Oceana.org.

NOAA.gov: “Seafood Import Monitoring Program,” “Online Tool Screens Finfish Fillets for Mislabeling, Substitution.”

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