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Running – Even a Little — Helps You Live Longer

By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Nov. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Even a little running on a regular basis can extend your life, Australian researchers say.

They analyzed 14 studies that included more than 232,000 people whose health was tracked for between 5.5 and 35 years. During the study periods, nearly 26,000 participants died.

The collective data showed that any amount of running was associated with a 30% lower risk of death from heart disease, and a 23% lower risk of death from cancer.

Even as little as 50 minutes of running once a week at a pace slower than 6 mph appeared to be protective, according to the authors of the study published online Nov. 4 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

They said that makes running a good option for people who say they are too busy to exercise.

The reasons running is associated with a reduced risk of premature death are unclear, and the study doesn’t establish cause and effect, said lead researcher Zeljko Pediscic. He’s an associate professor of public health at Victoria University in Melbourne, Australia.

His team also noted that the number of studies analyzed was small and considerable variation in their methods may have influenced the results.

Even so, any amount of running is better than none, the authors suggested.

“Increased rates of participation in running, regardless of its dose, would probably lead to substantial improvements in population health and longevity,” they concluded in a journal news release.

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Sources

SOURCE:British Journal of Sports Medicine, news release, Nov. 4, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Technicolor’s Mill Film Adelaide Up and Running

Global movie company Technicolor has launched a new post-production studio in Adelaide, Australia. The group’s first Southern Hemisphere operation, operating under the Mill Film banner, is up and running with 300 employees signed on — more than halfway to its goal of staffing up 500 people in five years.

Technicolor announced it would build a $ 26 million, 3000sq m visual effects studio in the South Australian capital of Adelaide in February 2018. It had been operating out of a temporary studio as of October 2018, and fully transitioned into its new space in June. The decision to locate the studio in South Australia followed a $ 6 million grant from the State Government’s Economic Investment Fund, which expects the project to have an economic benefit of more than $ 250 million over a decade. The state also offers a 10% rebate for post-production, digital and VFX work, on top of a similar federal offer of 30% of growth expenditure.

“It’s been a long time since there’s been some new investment into the visual effects market in Australia so people are seeing it as an opportunity to join something new and exciting,” said Mark Thorley, Managing Director, Mill Film Adelaide.

“Australia has had a rich history of good visual effects and talent and I think over a number of years many Australians have gone offshore to continue their careers in visual effects, so this was a great opportunity to bring those Australians back home,” he added. “We’re about 55% Australian and we’re doing a lot of work in training local Australians. We run the Technicolor Academy here in Adelaide, which really focuses on animation, lighting and environment work. We look for young talent who have had some experience, whether that be from an educational institution or just naturally talented individuals.”

The Academy is a fully paid, intensive program.

Mill Film Adelaide’s studio is three floors of open-plan artist spaces and productions offices, as well as six view rooms, a 40-seak 4K projection theater, three kitchens, and a large deck overlooking several local landmarks — including Parliament House, the Governor’s residence and Adelaide Oval. The facility was developed by Studio Nine Architects.

Thorley revealed that the new studio recently worked with Technicolor partner MPC in London on its first major job: 443 shots for Dora and the Lost City of Gold, which premiered globally this week.

“You’ll see some great character animation in there and really slapstick humour, something that supports Dora in her journey and brings laughs to the screen,” he said. “We have a fairly standard visual effects tool set here: animating in Maya, lighting in Katana, rendering in [Pixar’s RenderMan] – so nothing out of the ordinary. The technology was used to make the performance nuanced and subtle and provide the audience with moments of laughter, that was the goal for our animators and they really rose to that challenge.”

Mill Film Adelaide is also working on projects for Paramount, Universal and Amblin.

Adelaide is growing into an entertainment hub, and Mill Film joins a number of post-production/VFX companies set up in the capital, such as Kojo (Hotel Mumbai) and Rising Sun Pictures (X-Men film franchise).

Mill Film’s global network of studios includes set ups in Montreal, Los Angeles and a partnership with Technicolor Bangalore.

Learn more at www.themill.com/millfilm.

Dora and the Lost City of Gold

Dora and the Lost City of Gold

Mark Thorley

Mark Thorley

Animation Magazine

Choose Your Running Shoes Carefully

SATURDAY, Aug. 3, 2019 — If you’re a runner, the wrong running shoe could sideline you, a foot expert says.

Choose carefully, or you risk discomfort, pain and injuries such as shin splints, plantar fasciitis, stress fractures, irritated nerves or the loss of a toenail, warned Dr. Christina Rowe-Bauer, a podiatrist with Penn State Health Sports Medicine.

If you’re new to running or an experienced runner with foot or leg pain, see a doctor to learn about your general health, foot type and running style.

“Bring old athletic shoes; the wear patterns can give the doctor clues about things like foot overpronation (rolling inward) or supination (rolling outward),” Rowe-Bauer said in a Penn State news release. “Be honest about any pain experienced during or after running.”

When it comes time to buy shoes, there are certain factors you should consider, such as foot type, running style and terrain, she suggested.

Are your feet high-arched, flat or neutral? What is your running style? Some runners strike the ground first with the heel and roll through to push off the toes to their next stride, while others strike first with the forefoot and push immediately into the next stride.

And, finally, what type of surface are you running on? Shoe tread and cushioning should be appropriate for the surface, whether it’s treadmills, asphalt or dirt trails, Rowe-Bauer said.

When buying shoes, do so in-person at a store, preferably one with knowledgeable staff who encourage trial runs in the shoes at or outside the store.

Shop in the late afternoon because feet swell as the day progresses and as a run progresses, Rowe-Bauer said. When trying on shoes, wear the socks you wear while running. Choose shoes that fit well, regardless of size. Foot size changes over the years, and shoe sizes vary by brand and even by model within the same brand.

Select shoes with a wide toe box so that your toes aren’t constricted during running, she added.

Once you’ve found a good pair of shoes, consider buying a spare pair to have when the first pair wears out.

“Don’t stock up for lifetime running, though, since the correct pair of shoes today probably will not be the correct pair five years from now,” Rowe-Bauer said.

More information

The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society has more on choosing athletic shoes.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: August 2019

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No Amount of Running Is Too Hard on Your Heart

THURSDAY, July 11, 2019 — Ultramarathons are grueling races that typically range anywhere from 30 to 100 miles, but new research suggests that even these distances don’t tax the heart unduly.

“The good news is that while experienced runners pushed their heart limits during the ultramarathon, they did not show evidence of cardiac risk assessed through elevated biomarkers [such as cortisol levels],” said co-lead investigator Rodrigo Hohl. He’s a professor from the department of physiology at the Federal University of Juiz de Fora in Brazil.

In the study, researchers conducted blood tests on 25 participants in a 24-hour ultramarathon before and after the event.

Eleven of them were experienced ultramarathoners who’d trained a distance of more than 100 kilometers (60 miles) a week over five years, while 14 were first-time ultramarathoners who’d previously run at least one regular marathon.

After the event, the experienced runners were more likely than the first-timers to have elevated levels of blood biomarkers that measure heart health, but those levels did not pose a risk of heart damage. The experienced runners did have higher levels of cortisol.

The higher levels in the experienced runners reflected the greater load on the heart, according to the authors of the study published recently in the journal Heliyon.

“Experienced runners performed with greater intensity and speed, which placed strains on their hearts. Novice runners ran with less intensity, which resulted in lower cardiac biomarker levels,” Hohl explained in a journal news release.

He noted that ultramarathon runners self-pace for a set time and towards an established endpoint. Runners with different levels of training experience and competitive results have variations in running speeds and, therefore, different levels of heart biomarker in their blood.

“Novice runners appear to pace themselves well below their cardiac limit, self-selecting a safe pacing strategy for their hearts,” Hohl said.

Despite the findings, ultramarathon runners shouldn’t consider themselves free of risk from heart damage, according to the researchers.

“Our study provides evidence for caution and self-monitoring, especially for experienced runners,” Hohl said. “After participating in an ultramarathon, runners should recover for at least two days before running any significant distance. This time is needed to normalize cardiac markers and allow the heart time to recover after such a challenge.”

More information

ULTRAmarathonRunning.com offers resources on training for an ultramarathon.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: July 2019

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What Maureen West Learned From Running the Nation’s Leading Hemp Program

As with many emerging industries, getting ahead in the industrial-hemp industry often involves hiring the people who created the original regulations. In legal marijuana, for example, everyone from former state legislators to past Marijuana Enforcement Division officials have moved to the business side, helping companies and clients stay on top of Colorado’s strict cannabis laws.

One of the largest moves from government to the hemp industry (so far, at least) came last month, when Maureen West jumped from managing the Colorado Department of Agriculture’s Industrial Hemp Program to take a job as compliance officer for hemp-oil company Functional Remedies.

As head of the CDA’s hemp program from 2016 to 2019, West witnessed the recent hemp and CBD booms in Colorado and had to deal with such issues as hot hemp with too much THC and lack of guidance from the Food and Drug Administration. Those challenges didn’t prevent Colorado from leading the nation in hemp farming acreage during that span, however.

We recently caught up with West to learn more about the future of the plant now that it’s legal at the federal level.

Westword: How would you compare Colorado’s hemp industry and regulations with those of other states? I hear some are relatively friendly, like Oregon, while others, like South Dakota, aren’t so much.

Maureen West: Over the course of my career as the head of the CDA Industrial Hemp Program, we built one of the most robust state-level industrial-hemp programs in the country. We worked closely with farmers across the state and listened to their needs and concerns. Hemp could be the next big cash crop that saves small farmers across America, and we are proving that to be true right here in Colorado at Functional Remedies.

What have you learned about hemp since you started at the CDA, and how did that help you with your new job?

Marijuana Deals Near You

Hemp has been a product in America’s history since the founding fathers; George Washington famously grew hemp. But today’s hemp landscape, because of stigma and prohibition, is confusing without clear guidelines at the state and federal levels. The work we did at the CDA was to put those guidelines in place to not only help legitimate businesses bring good jobs to Colorado, but also to protect consumers from products that they shouldn’t be ingesting. We did this all when there was no real blueprint. So my role will be to help Functional Remedies navigate, influence and stay within those guidelines, even as they are being created.

What challenges are hemp farmers and product makers facing today that the public might not know about?

One of the biggest challenges right now is that we aren’t getting any clear guidance from the FDA. This is leaving a huge gap for illegitimate companies to compete with legitimate companies, all while consumers lose trust with hemp or CBD products. The saying goes, ‘A bad apple spoils the bunch.’ With tighter regulations, it’s much easier to find and toss those bad apples.

Is the 0.3 THC limit a looming problem for hemp farmers as it becomes legal nationwide?

The 0.3 percent THC limit has already presented problems for companies shipping hemp across state borders. The hemp industry doesn’t have standard testing protocols across the United States. In part, we need the FDA or Congress to help set those standards. Another solution would be to allow an acceptable range. Plants are plants; the top of the plant can test differently than the bottom, and two plants of the same strain could test differently.

How ethical do you think the CBD industry really is? We hear a lot of snake-oil stories, but a lot of companies are operating in unregulated markets.

The problem is that we don’t have any real consistent regulations across the board, and many people and companies are happy to jump on what they see is a trend or act within that gray area. This is why it’s so incredibly important that we put them in place to protect consumers and help legitimate businesses thrive.

How far behind is America’s hemp industry from Europe’s or Canada’s?

America is just starting to overcome the decades of stigma against hemp because of its ties with cannabis. However, we are moving incredibly quickly as we see states enacting their own hemp laws across the U.S. The faster we can build this momentum and gain additional clarity from the FDA and Congress, the faster we can create a globally competitive hemp industry.


Toke of the Town

Man charged after running in underwear on Atlanta airport runway

(Reuters) – A teenager has been criminally charged after running half-naked across an Atlanta airport runway and jumping onto the wing of a Delta Air Lines plane that had just landed.

Officials on Wednesday said Jhyrin Jones, 19, conducted his escapade after scaling a 12-foot high fence topped with barbed wire at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, the world’s busiest, the previous afternoon.

Police took about five minutes to apprehend Jones, who had been barefoot and wearing only underwear, after being alerted by an airport employee, Atlanta Police Major Timothy Peek told reporters.

“What can stop a person from jumping a fence?” Peek said, adding the Jones had also dashed through an open construction site and over a public fence. “There are plenty of laws to deter activity – unfortunately, they don’t stop activity.”

Jones was charged with criminal trespassing, public indecency, causing damage and obstruction of law enforcement officers.

Bond was set on Wednesday at $ 18,000 by a magistrate court in Clayton County, Georgia, court documents showed.

Jones’ lawyer did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

A man in underpants gestures as he walks to a plane on the tarmac at the airport in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., June 26, 2018 in this picture obtained from social media. TK JAMES/via REUTERS

Onboard passenger Tim James recalled his fear at the sight of Jones on the wing, attempting to rip open the emergency door of the plane that had just arrived from Miami.

“He actually got it open until the stewardess and the people in the aisle started fighting back,” James, 32, a marketing manager from Atlanta, said in an interview on Wednesday.

“People were crying. My first thoughts were he had jumped off of the plane, so I was more concerned he had something else on the plane that needed to be taken off. It was scary.”

After the flight crew secured the door, Jones walked up to the window where James was sitting.

“He pulled out his ID. Then he put it in his mouth and ripped it apart and threw it on the ground,” James said.

Jones had two prior arrests in his home state of Alabama, one for a handgun violation and another for underage drinking, according to WSB-TV.

The arrest follows a string of similar incidents at other U.S. airports.

In February, a shirtless passenger who had been ejected from his flight attacked an employee on the tarmac at North Carolina’s Charlotte Douglas Airport.

Police arrest a man in underpants on the tarmac at the airport in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., June 26, 2018 in this picture obtained from social media. TK JAMES/via REUTERS

At Miami International Airport, a man who sneaked onto a luggage conveyor belt reached the tarmac in November and in January a man entered the cargo area there, claiming to be lost.

Reporting by Tea Kvetenadze; Additional reporting by Barbara Goldberg in New York; Editing by Richard Chang

Reuters: Oddly Enough

Man charged after running in underwear on Atlanta airport runway

(Reuters) – A teenager has been criminally charged after running half-naked across an Atlanta airport runway and jumping onto the wing of a Delta Air Lines plane that had just landed.

Officials on Wednesday said Jhyrin Jones, 19, conducted his escapade after scaling a 12-foot high fence topped with barbed wire at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, the world’s busiest, the previous afternoon.

Police took about five minutes to apprehend Jones, who had been barefoot and wearing only underwear, after being alerted by an airport employee, Atlanta Police Major Timothy Peek told reporters.

“What can stop a person from jumping a fence?” Peek said, adding the Jones had also dashed through an open construction site and over a public fence. “There are plenty of laws to deter activity – unfortunately, they don’t stop activity.”

Jones was charged with criminal trespassing, public indecency, causing damage and obstruction of law enforcement officers.

Bond was set on Wednesday at $ 18,000 by a magistrate court in Clayton County, Georgia, court documents showed.

Jones’ lawyer did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

A man in underpants gestures as he walks to a plane on the tarmac at the airport in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., June 26, 2018 in this picture obtained from social media. TK JAMES/via REUTERS

Onboard passenger Tim James recalled his fear at the sight of Jones on the wing, attempting to rip open the emergency door of the plane that had just arrived from Miami.

“He actually got it open until the stewardess and the people in the aisle started fighting back,” James, 32, a marketing manager from Atlanta, said in an interview on Wednesday.

“People were crying. My first thoughts were he had jumped off of the plane, so I was more concerned he had something else on the plane that needed to be taken off. It was scary.”

After the flight crew secured the door, Jones walked up to the window where James was sitting.

“He pulled out his ID. Then he put it in his mouth and ripped it apart and threw it on the ground,” James said.

Jones had two prior arrests in his home state of Alabama, one for a handgun violation and another for underage drinking, according to WSB-TV.

The arrest follows a string of similar incidents at other U.S. airports.

In February, a shirtless passenger who had been ejected from his flight attacked an employee on the tarmac at North Carolina’s Charlotte Douglas Airport.

Police arrest a man in underpants on the tarmac at the airport in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., June 26, 2018 in this picture obtained from social media. TK JAMES/via REUTERS

At Miami International Airport, a man who sneaked onto a luggage conveyor belt reached the tarmac in November and in January a man entered the cargo area there, claiming to be lost.

Reporting by Tea Kvetenadze; Additional reporting by Barbara Goldberg in New York; Editing by Richard Chang

Reuters: Oddly Enough

Pennsylvania’s Medical Marijuana Dispensaries Running Dry

DEVON, Pa. (AP) — Pennsylvania’s budding medical marijuana dispensaries have just about run out of marijuana. Philly.com reports Friday that high demand has caused the two open dispensaries in the Philadelphia region to go nearly dry less than two weeks after sales started under Pennsylvania’s new medical marijuana program. TerraVida Holistic Center in Bucks County […]
Marijuana

Running in the Cold: How to Survive and Thrive

SUNDAY, Jan. 14, 2018 — Whether you’re training for a marathon or just logging miles, cold-weather running requires some special health and safety precautions, according to a sports medicine expert.

That said, it also gives you a chance to get ahead of the competition because people often don’t train once serious cold sets in, Dr. Joshua Blomgren said in a news release. He’s a primary care sports medicine physician at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush in Chicago, and the aid station medical lead for the Bank of America Chicago Marathon.

As for precautions, start by letting the temperature and road conditions dictate your pace and mileage, Blomgren advises. You can run at a normal pace on dry and paved surfaces, but slow down when conditions are icy and slippery.

Also stick to paved roads. Avoid wooded trails and paths, which are more likely to be icy or snow-packed.

He also suggests running during mid-day, when temperatures are generally highest. Dress in layers with fabrics that move moisture away from your body.

When it’s extremely cold, warm up indoors before heading outside. Start your run slowly and gradually increase your speed. Blomgren says that these precautions will reduce the risk of muscle and ligament injuries.

Though your chances of overheating are slim during cold weather, other health concerns remain.

For instance, at temperatures below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, your heart has to work harder, resulting in a higher heart rate and blood pressure, Blomgren says. He suggests using a heart rate monitor to alert you to any abnormalities that might develop.

Also consider using cold weather as a reason to do indoor cross-training, such as hip and core strengthening, he suggests. That can help you build a strong base for running when it gets warmer.

More information

The American Osteopathic Association outlines how to stay active in cold weather.

© 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: January 2018

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Florida: John Morgan Talks Lawsuit, Rescheduling, and Running for Gov

One Orlando trial attorney has some rather elevated goals for 2018. John Morgan, the Florida attorney who helped finance the epic battle for medicinal cannabis in the Sunshine State, has three new goals on his immediate horizon: Sue the state for their legislative faux pas prohibiting the smoking of prescribed medical marijuana, reschedule the therapeutic […]
Marijuana

Walking vs. Running — Which Is Better?

By Regina Boyle Wheeler

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Running and walking are both popular ways to get a great cardio workout. But is a brisk walk really as good an exercise as a sweaty, heart-pounding run?

Research reported by the American Heart Association finds that walking is just as good as running when it comes to lowering your risk for heart disease.

Researchers analyzed the health of some 48,000 runners and walkers mainly in 40s and 50s. They found that, mile for mile, brisk walking lowers the risk for diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure as much as running does.

The difference? You’ll have to spend more time walking than you do running to get the same health benefits simply because it takes longer to walk than to run the same distance. For instance, a 15-minute jog burns about the same number of calories as a half-hour brisk walk.

Keep in mind that the chance of being injured is greater in runners because running puts more stress on the body — on the joints in particular.

But if you’re still thinking of stepping up the pace to running, first check with your doctor, especially if you have arthritis or other health conditions, like heart disease.

And keep in mind that you don’t have to stick to either walking or running. You can stay motivated by mixing it up. What’s more, adding short sprints to your walking routine will give you a bigger calorie-burning boost for your efforts.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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1 in 3 Hospitals in Developing World Lack Running Water

SUNDAY July 3, 2016, 2016 — Clean running water is essential for hospital sanitation, but a new report finds a third of hospitals in the developing world don’t have it.

“Running water is something we so take for granted and it doesn’t exist in a third of hospitals in these countries,” said study co-leader Dr. Adam Kushner, adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, in Baltimore.

He said some hospitals try to find a way around the problem, but hazards remain.

“Some hospitals truck in water or collect it in rain barrels, with no guarantee of its cleanliness,” Kushner said. “Without clean water, there is no way to clean surgeons’ hands or instruments, wash gowns and sheets or clean wounds to prevent or reduce infections.”

His team examined 19 studies published between 2009 and 2015. The studies included data on water availability in 430 hospitals in 19 low- and middle-income nations.

In all, 147 (34 percent) of the hospitals did not have continuous running water, with rates varying country to country. For example, less than 20 percent of hospitals in Liberia had proper water facilities, while more than 90 percent had them in Bangladesh and Ghana.

“In order to provide basic health care, you need a functioning system and running water is part of that,” Kushner said in a school news release. This widespread issue “shows the deficiencies in the health systems in general in those countries,” he said.

In many developing nations, large numbers of people can’t get needed surgery, and lack of water makes that problem even worse, the researchers said.

“Hopefully, people aren’t operating [without water], but what do you do if a woman shows up in obstructed labor and needs an emergency C-section and it’s the dry season and the rain barrel is empty?” Kushner said. “You can’t operate with dirty instruments, but if you don’t she’s going to die. This is the sort of dilemma that surgeons in these hospitals face.”

The findings were published online recently in the Journal of Surgical Research.

More information

The American College of Surgeons offers surgery resources for patients.

Posted: July 2016

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Time Running out for PA House to Act on Medical Marijuana

still waiting room 3
Patients at the Pennsylvania Statehouse in a symbolic doctor’s office, still waiting for the House to act.

With very few session days remaining this year, Republican leadership in Pennsylvania still has not introduced medical marijuana legislation in the House. Early reports about the contents of the draft still raise serious concerns — including a 10% THC cap, an explicit prohibition on dried flowers and plants, and no immediate legal protections for patients.

If you are a Pennsylvania resident, please call your representative today! Let him or her know it is critical that these problems are addressed and the bill is brought to the floor for a vote immediately. You can click here to find your representative’s contact information along with talking points to guide your call.

It has been almost six months since the Senate passed sensible medical cannabis legislation. Seriously ill patients have been suffering while waiting for the House to take action. They should not have to wait one more day. It is time for the House to vote on comprehensive and compassionate medical marijuana legislation. Let them know that Pennsylvanians are tired of waiting. They need to do it right! Do it now! Let them know that compassionate use legislation should be focused on the needs of patients and not politics as usual.

Urge them to tell leadership our concerns and to demand safe and affordable access for Pennsylvania’s most fragile citizens.

The post Time Running out for PA House to Act on Medical Marijuana appeared first on MPP Blog.


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