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Sweetened Drinks Still Top Sellers to Kids

By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Drinks marketed to children often contain loads of unhealthy sugars and sweeteners, and they come in packages that deliver too-large servings, a new report finds.

None of 34 sweetened drinks aimed at the youth market meet nutrition recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), according to University of Connecticut researchers.

“Sweetened drinks are about two-thirds of children’s drink sales, compared to 100% juice-and-water blends,” said lead researcher Jennifer Harris, director of marketing initiatives for the university’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity in Hartford. “Parents may be surprised to know that pediatricians, dentists and other nutrition experts recommend against serving any of these drinks to children.”

Sweetened drinks have been identified as a major source of excess calories for kids.

Added sugars account for 17% of the total caloric intake of children and teens, and sugary beverages contribute almost half of those added sugars, according to AAP.

For this study, Harris and her team looked only at products marketed for children, ignoring sodas, sports drinks and iced teas that are promoted for a wider audience.

They identified 67 products from 23 drink brands. About half contained added sweeteners; the others didn’t.

The sweetened drinks made up 62% of the $ 2.2 billion in children’s drink sales in 2018, researchers said. Pure juice or juice/water blends accounted for 38% of sales.

One serving of many of the highest-selling fruit drink brands — Capri Sun, Hawaiian Punch, Sunny D and Minute Maid Lemonade — had more than 50% of the recommended amount of daily added sugars for kids, researchers said.

Two-thirds of sweetened fruit drinks and flavored waters contained no fruit juice at all, the report said. Most that did have some fruit juice contained just 5%.

Even ostensibly healthier 100% fruit juice came in packaging that made the drink potentially unhealthy to kids, researchers found.

The AAP has recommended that 1- to 3-year-olds have at most 4 ounces of pure fruit juice per day, and older preschoolers, no more than 6 ounces.

Continued

“They don’t need juice, but if they’re going to drink it, they should drink it in limited amounts,” Harris said.

But most single-serving 100% juice boxes and pouches contain more than 4 ounces, exceeding the recommended daily amount for toddlers, researchers found.

And some juice boxes and pouches even exceeded the 6-ounce serving recommended for preschoolers.

“We found a very small number of products that would be appropriate for a child under 3,” Harris said. “Most of the juice boxes and pouches are bigger than a toddler should be drinking.”

Experts recommend that children over a year old drink only plain water or milk, she said.

“They don’t need any other kind of drinks,” Harris said. “If you’re going to give them juice, look for 100% juice in small servings.”

Packaging often confuses rather than enlightens. Brands offering both sweetened drinks and drinks without added sweeteners often used similar-looking packages, flavor names and fruit images, researchers said.

For example, about 85% of sweetened drinks contained images of fruit on their packaging, but only 35% contained any juice at all, researchers said.

Parents have to look closely to figure out exactly what a drink contains, Harris said.

“You can’t trust the front of the packages to know what’s inside the drinks,” she said. “You have to look at the Nutrition Facts panel to see what ingredients are in there.”

Sweetened drinks are marketed heavily to children, the researchers also found.

Children between 2 and 11 see more than twice as many ads for sweetened drinks as for healthier alternatives, researchers said. These kids also see four times as many ads for sweetened drinks than their parents do.

The American Beverage Association (ABA) responded to the study in a statement.

“America’s beverage companies agree that it’s important for families to moderate sugar consumption to ensure a balanced, healthy lifestyle, and this is especially true for young children,” the statement said.

“Our companies strictly follow guidelines established by independent monitors that limit the marketing of beverages to children to 100% juice, water or dairy-based beverages and monitor TV, radio and digital advertising to confirm compliance,” the ABA added.

Continued

Kristi King, a national spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, also reacted to the report.

It “may not be what we wanted to see, but it definitely is useful in that we can take this report and hopefully come up with a plan that helps the health of the children,” she said.

Health care and industry will need to work together to help reduce kids’ access to excess sugar, said King, a senior dietitian at Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston.

“I don’t think this is something that health care can do on its own by working with parents,” she said.

The Rudd Center report, released Oct. 16, recommends several steps to reduce kids’ consumption of sweetened drinks, including:

  • Packaging that clearly indicates on the front whether a product contains added sugars, as well as the percentage of juice inside,
  • State taxes on sugary drinks,
  • A ban on direct advertisements to children for drinks containing added sugars.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Jennifer Harris, Ph.D., M.B.A., director, marketing initiatives, Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, University of Connecticut, Hartford; Kristi King, M.P.H., R.D.N., senior dietitian, Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston; statement, American Beverage Association;Children’s Drink Facts 2019, report, Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, University of Connecticut, Oct. 16, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Pagination

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NYC Sues Flavored Online E-Cigarette Sellers

Oct. 10, 2019 — Twenty-two online sellers of flavored e-cigarettes are being sued by New York City for allegedly targeting young people through social media.

The defendants created “a public nuisance” by selling e-cigarettes to people under 21 even though such sales have been illegal in the city since 2013, according to the lawsuit filed Tuesday, CNN reported.

“Preying on minors and hooking them on a potentially lethal, lifelong nicotine addiction is unconscionable,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said in a statement. “This lawsuit sends a message: we will do whatever it takes to protect our kids and the health of our city.”

Nationwide, state and local governments have taken action to limit children’s access to e-cigarettes, CNN reported.

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Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Colorado lawmakers OK co-op banking option for marijuana sellers

A woman blows smoke rings with marijuana smoke during the 4/20 Rally at the Civic Center in Denver, Colorado, April 20, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Leffingwell

A woman blows smoke rings with marijuana smoke during the 4/20 Rally at the Civic Center in Denver, Colorado, April 20, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Mark Leffingwell

(Reuters) – The Colorado legislature on Wednesday voted to create the nation’s first state-run financial cooperative for marijuana sellers, with the aim of giving newly legalized cannabis retail outlets access to key banking services through the U.S. Federal Reserve.

The approval of the so-called “cannabis credit co-ops” came on the final day of the legislative session, as lawmakers seek to address problems marijuana retailers face in having to operate on a cash-only basis, such as burglary threats.

The proposal’s chief sponsor, Representative Jonathan Singer, said the cooperatives are needed because traditional banks and credit unions have been hesitant to serve the burgeoning marijuana industry as long as the drug remains outlawed by the U.S. government.

“This is the final piece to our pot puzzle,” said Singer, a Democrat.

The final approval on Wednesday came after both chambers of the General Assembly cleared their own versions of the bill. The bill now heads to Democratic Governor John Hickenlooper for his signature.

Voters in Colorado and Washington state legalized the possession and use of small amounts of cannabis by adults for recreational purposes in 2012. Both states are among 20 that allow the use of cannabis for medical reasons.

The first recreational cannabis shops opened in Colorado in January, and Washington is set to follow suit later this year.

Singer said the cash-only nature of the industry makes pot businesses targets of crime, limits owners’ access to credit and capital and hinders the state’s ability to track revenues for tax-collection purposes.

Under the bill, the financial cooperatives would operate similarly to credit unions – without a deposit insurance requirement – and would be governed by the state’s financial services commissioner.

But to gain access to banking services such as credit card processing and checking accounts, the Federal Reserve would need to approve the plan, which critics say is unlikely in the absence of a deposit insurance mandate.

Republicans who voted against the measure said such complex legislation needed further study and should not have been rushed through the legislature at the end of its session.

The Obama administration in February issued new law-enforcement guidelines aimed at encouraging banks to start doing business with state-licensed marijuana suppliers, even though such enterprises remain illegal under federal law.

The guidance stopped short of promising blanket immunity to banks, and financial industry officials have said they doubted many banks would begin to accept cannabis suppliers as customers without changes in federal law.

Another bill headed to the governor’s desk allocates tax revenues derived from retail pot sales to marijuana enforcement, and to fund education programs designed to prevent youths from using the drug.

Also on Wednesday, Colorado legislators approved a requirement that cannabis-infused edibles be readily identifiable as containing THC, the psychoactive property in marijuana.

A bill to limit the amount of concentrates inside cannabis products also won passage this week, an issue that gained attention following two deaths possibly linked to the ingestion of marijuana products.

(Editing by Steve Gorman, Eric Walsh, Eric M. Johnson and Michael Urquhart)


Reuters: Oddly Enough

Colorado Senate OKs co-op banking option for marijuana sellers

(Reuters) – The Colorado state Senate passed a bill on Wednesday to create the nation’s first state-run marijuana financial cooperative, with the ultimate aim of opening newly legalized cannabis retail outlets to key banking services through the Federal Reserve.

The 24-11 vote approving the so-called “cannabis credit co-ops” came days after the state House of Representatives cleared its own version of the bill, which seeks to address problems marijuana retailers face in having to operate on a cash-only basis.

House-Senate negotiators must now reconcile differences between the two versions in hopes of sending a compromise bill back for final floor votes in both chambers before the Democratic-controlled General Assembly session ends at midnight.

If they meet the deadline, the legislation will then head to Governor John Hickenlooper, a Democrat, who is expected to sign the bill into law.

The proposal’s chief sponsor, Representative Jonathan Singer, said the cooperatives are needed because traditional banks and credit unions have been hesitant to serve the burgeoning marijuana industry as long as the drug remains outlawed by the U.S. government.

“This is the final piece to our pot puzzle,” said Singer, a Democrat.

Voters in Colorado and Washington state legalized the possession and use of small amounts of cannabis by adults for recreational purposes in 2012. Both states are among 20 states that allow the use of cannabis for medical reasons.

The first recreational cannabis shops opened in Colorado in January, and Washington is set to follow suit later this year.

Singer said the cash-only nature of the industry makes pot businesses targets of crime, limits owners’ access to credit and capital and hinders the state’s ability to track revenues for tax-collection purposes.

Under the bill, the financial cooperatives would operate similarly to credit unions – without a deposit insurance requirement – and would be governed by the state’s financial services commissioner.

But to gain access to banking services such as credit card processing and checking accounts, the Federal Reserve would need to approve the plan, which critics say is unlikely in the absence of a deposit insurance mandate.

Republicans voted against the measure, saying such complex legislation needed further study and should not have been rushed through the legislature at the end of its session.

The Obama administration in February issued new law-enforcement guidelines aimed at encouraging banks to start doing business with state-licensed marijuana suppliers, even though such enterprises remain illegal under federal law.

The guidance stopped short of promising blanket immunity to banks, and financial industry officials have said they doubted many banks would begin to accept cannabis suppliers as customers without actual changes in federal law.

(Editing by Steve Gorman and Eric Walsh)


Reuters: Oddly Enough

New Poll Says Americans Don’t Want Marijuana Users, Growers And Sellers Arrested In States Where It Is Legal

A new Reason-Rupe poll shows some very interesting numbers from respondents nationwide when it comes to marijuana in the states where it is legal for recreational purposes.

420times 000006813391XSmall 150x150 New Poll Says Americans Dont Want Marijuana Users, Growers And Sellers Arrested In States Where It Is LegalIn states like Colorado and Washington that have legalized marijuana for adults, 72% of poll respondents believe that cannabis users should not be targeted by the federal government. Among those who approve of the job President Obama is doing, this number rises to 77%.

When it comes to cannabis growers in states where marijuana is legal, 68% of respondents to the poll said they should not be arrested by the feds either.

What about those who sell marijuana is Colorado and Washington? 64% say the federal government should lay off them as well. That a large majority in all three areas.

The same poll also finds that 53% of Americans think marijuana should be treated like alcohol, with 45% against that notion. In all cases, Democrats and Independents were more favorable to marijuana law reform than Republicans. Overall, 47% say they favor legalization for recreational marijuana use, while 49% oppose it, a margin within the poll’s margin of error.

The tipping point has been passed, the dam has been broken; however you want to phrase it, marijuana legalization proponents clearly have the political and practical momentum. It is now up to advocates to capitalize on that momentum and bring cannabis freedom to people in more states.

– Joe Klare

– make sure you check out our new Forums and our “Stop The Ban in L.A.” Facebook page

Filed Under: ActivismExclusive Web ContentPoliticsThe War On Drugs

The 420 Times

September NPDs: Madden, Gears 3, and Xbox 360 the Top Sellers

Madden NFL 12



As was already announced by Microsoft, Gears of War 3 managed to sell more than 3 million units worldwide in its first week. The portion of those copies sold in the United States were enough to make it September’s second best-selling game behind only Madden NFL 12 (likely due to Madden benefiting from being available on Xbox 360, PS3, Wii, PS2, and PSP). Although Madden was released in August, it wasn’t accounted for in the August NPD numbers because of when the reporting period ended. September’s numbers cover August 28 through October 1.

Resistance 3 was the PS3’s big exclusive in September; it came in at number seven. The multiplatform Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine, which also debuted last month, came in at number ten.

No doubt thanks to Madden’s launch being counted in September, videogame software sales were up three percent as compared with September 2010. Hardware and accessories were down nine and 14 percent, respectively.

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Legal Marijuana in Arizona but Not for The Sellers

Marijuana is known to cause red eyes, gales of laughter and the munchies. In Arizona, add another side effect: utter confusion.

Voters narrowly approved a ballot initiative last November allowing medical marijuana in the state, but the result has been just the opposite of an orderly system of dispensing cannabis to the truly sick. Rather, police raids, surreptitious money transfers and unofficial pot clubs have followed passage of the new law, creating a chaotic situation not far removed from the black-market system that has always existed.

“There’s confusion,” said Ross Taylor, who owns CannaPatient, a newly formed company that helps patients get the medical certification required to receive state-issued medical marijuana cards. “There are a lot of unsure people, and not just because of what happened to me.”

The police raided Mr. Taylor’s home in June, one of several instances in which the authorities in the state have showed signs of resisting carrying out the new law, which took effect at the start of the year.

Gov. Jan Brewer — who campaigned against the law, then signed it with reluctance — said in May that the state, which has issued more than 7,500 cards to medical marijuana patients, would delay issuing licenses to marijuana dispensaries, as the law requires. Instead, she filed suit in federal court seeking a ruling on whether the state’s medical marijuana law conflicted with federal prohibitions on marijuana. So the patients have their cards permitting them to buy marijuana in Arizona, but no official place to do so.

Arizona is not just another state when it comes to marijuana. More Mexican-grown marijuana enters this state than any other, according to federal government data. On June 8, the authorities recovered more than 1,200 pounds from an S.U.V. that led them on a 20-mile chase through dirt roads near the border.

The police operation that took place the next day in Gilbert, a community outside Phoenix, netted a considerably smaller haul: about two ounces. In that case, the police executed a search warrant on Mr. Taylor’s house after getting a tip from the cable man. The officers, Mr. Taylor said, did not appear interested in his medical marijuana card, which permits him to grow up to a dozen marijuana plants in his home or obtain up to 2.5 ounces from a caregiver or a dispensary.

The police said they were pursuing those taking advantage of the new marijuana law.

The law does not permit the sale of marijuana outside of nonprofit dispensaries. But because the state has yet to approve any such outlets to sell marijuana, other ways of getting the drug are being tried.

Last month, the police raided the offices of a group in Tempe that was growing marijuana and selling it to cardholders. Garry Ferguson, founder of the organization, the Medical Marijuana Advocacy Group, told reporters that he understood the law to allow the sale of marijuana from one cardholder to another.

Unofficial cannabis clubs, not mentioned in the law, are also emerging. They purport to offer free marijuana to cardholders, albeit for a membership fee. For now, they are unregulated.

“In lieu of a regulated industry, we’re now creating an environment in which patients are growing their own with limited oversight, and these private clubs of questionable legality are popping up,” said Joe Yuhas of the Arizona Medical Marijuana Association, which led the medical marijuana campaign.

Ms. Brewer, a Republican, recently lamented “the dreadful situation” the state now finds itself in with marijuana legal for some.

Marijuana users consider the uncertainty dreadful as well, with some fearful that applying for cards might lead to police scrutiny. “I have friends who are afraid to get cards,” said Brad Scalf, 55, a disabled veteran. “I figured that when I’m smoking out on the back porch and the neighbors complain, I don’t have to worry. It’s like a get out of jail free card.”

The state’s legal case has been assigned to the same federal judge who found parts of Arizona’s immigration law to be unconstitutional. In that dispute, Arizona argued against the idea that the state should be hamstrung by federal immigration law. In this instance, the state seems to be seeking a ruling that federal law ought to prevail.

“The state has been beating the drum on states’ rights, but all of a sudden it has taken a 180-degree turn,” said Ken Frakes, a lawyer for the Rose Law Group, which represents a number of marijuana dispensary applicants.

Ms. Brewer said the decision to go to court was made to protect state employees from prosecution after Dennis K. Burke, the United States attorney for Arizona, sent a letter to state officials warning that the federal government still considered marijuana an illegal drug and would go after those who ran large marijuana production operations. Mr. Burke has subsequently said he had no intention of prosecuting state employees.

Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey held up carrying out his state’s medical marijuana law, one of 17 across the country, over similar concerns, but he announced this week that he would allow the program to go ahead.

In Arizona, some of the cannabis clubs are operating surreptitiously to avoid the notice of law enforcement. But not the 2811 Club, named for the provision of the law allowing state-approved marijuana patients to share marijuana among themselves.

Allan Sobol, the club’s marketing manager, has invited reporters in and offered instruction on the ins and outs of the new law to a group of Phoenix police officers. Everyone who enters must have a state-issued card, and no smoking is allowed on the premises, to prevent people from driving under the influence.

The dimly lit club offers classes and has computers and books available to research the many plant varieties, and comfortable chairs to enable patients to chat among themselves. It is the marijuana counter, though, that brings people in.

Club members, who pay a $ 25 application fee, also must pay $ 75 every time they walk through the door. Once inside, they are entitled to about 3 grams of marijuana, which is grown by other cardholders and donated to the club. Those growers, according to the law, can be compensated only for the cost of their supplies. On a recent afternoon, there were a number of varieties available, including Master Kush, Blue Dream and Granddaddy Purple.

“There’s nothing to be ashamed of when you come in,” said Mr. Sobol, who has emerged as a spokesman for the embattled industry, but says he tried marijuana for the first time last week when he ate a salad made with marijuana dressing. “We want people to come in with dignity and get this medicine that is now legal.”

Mr. Sobol said he is convinced that the club, which is planning to expand throughout the Phoenix area, is on solid legal ground. But the club does not comply with the strict regulatory requirements for dispensaries, which has prompted state officials to order an inquiry. Mr. Sobol said that given the uncertainty surrounding the program, he would be foolhardy not to look over his shoulder. “We have to be concerned,” he said. “I have lawyers on call. They may arrest me, but if that day comes and they come barging through the front door, I’m convinced they’ll never convict me.”

A version of this article appeared in print on July 23, 2011, on page A10 of the New York edition.

Source: New York Times (NY)
Author: Marc Lacey
Published: July 23, 2011
Copyright: 2011 The New York Times Company
Contact: letters@nytimes.com
Website: http://www.nytimes.com/

Other Posts of Interest:

  1. Arizona Preps for Pot Shop Green Rush
  2. Arizona Becomes 15th State To Approve Marijuana
  3. Arizona Doctors May Face Marijuana Dilemma
  4. Arizona Lawmakers Are Debating Tax On Medical Marijuana

Cannabis News – Medical Marijuana, Marijuana News, Hemp, Cannabis

April NPDs: Mortal Kombat and Xbox 360 the Top Sellers

Mortal Kombat



Update: According to NetherRealm’s Ed Boon, the NPD figures don’t count “special versions” of Mortal Kombat, in which case the game sold over 1 million units in April. Sony also confirmed to 1UP that the 13% increase in PS3 systems sold is year-over-year, in which case that adds up to about 204,304 PS3s. And Nintendo confirmed its systems’ sales figures, according to MarketWatch: 172,000 Wiis (down 38% from April 2010) and 194,000 3DSes.

Original Story: Mortal Kombat was the best selling game in the month of April, according to the latest figures released by the NPD Group. It sold nearly 900,000 units between the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 versions. Portal 2 was the next best-selling game, although no specific numbers for Valve’s latest game were cited. That’s just as well, as the game undoubtedly sold a great deal through Steam, the numbers from which would not be included in the NPDs.

Call of Duty: Black Ops, which was the best-selling game from its release until March, managed to still make a very respectable appearance at number four. It was topped by Lego Star Wars III at number three, which shot up several spots from its debut at number six in March. Just Dance 2 and Michael Jackson: The Experience returned to the top ten, and NBA 2K11 continues to sell well, thanks in part to the lack of competition from EA. Homefront and Dragon Age II, two of March’s top games, fell from the list completely. Five games sold over 250,000 units during the month, up from two during April 2010.

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N.J. Announces 6 Licensed Medical Marijuana Growers, Sellers

?The six state-licensed growers and sellers for New Jersey medical marijuana patients have just been announced by the state health department.The list of dispensaries, known as “alternative treatment centers,” or ATCs, in New Jersey, as reported by Susan K. Livio at NJ.com, is as follows:• Breakwater Alternative Treatment Center Corp., Manalapan, Monmouth County• Compassionate Care Centers of America Foundation Inc., New Brunswick, Middlesex County• Compassionate Care Foundation Inc., Bellmawr, Camden County• Compassionate Sciences, INc., either Burlington or Camden County• Foundation Harmony, Secaucus, Hudson County• Greenleaf Compassion Center, Montclair, Essex CountyThe state health department released the list of winning applicants on Monday, despite the Legislature’s intent to repeal the medical marijuana program rules draft by the Christie Administration.

Continue reading “N.J. Announces 6 Licensed Medical Marijuana Growers, Sellers” >

Toke of the Town

Pokemon, PSP are Top Japanese Sellers of 2010

The ASCII Corporation has compiled a list of the top-selling games and game consoles in Japan in 2010. Unsurprisingly, the company that stands tall on both charts is Nintendo. Five of the top ten games are for the DS, three are for the Wii, and two of these titles are holdovers from the previous year.

Pokemon Black & White (recently announced for the US) was the most popular game of 2010 in Japan, setting records at launch and spending five weeks in the top position on the charts until being dethroned by Nintendo’s own Super Mario All-Stars re-release.

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