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VFX & Animation Shop Od Studios Sets Up in Vancouver

Od Studios, a startup vfx/animation studio founded by industry veterans Marc Horsfield and Jason Brewer, has carved out a space in Vancouver, BC to create groundbreaking visuals for movies and television. The founders view this fresh start as a unique opportunity to combine technical excellence, ground breaking storytelling and unforgettable artistry from around the globe.

“We want to foster a culture of creativity that raises the bar for great visual storytelling, not just for our clients, but for everyone that works at our studio,” said Horsfield. “Anyone on our team is encouraged to develop stories; if it lines up with the company vision then we’ll help them develop it, pitch it and get it produced. It’s a win-win for all of us. Developing a solid foundation of storytelling in the studio is one of our founding principles and something we hope to pursue with all the resources available to us.”

Formerly Head of Production Technology at Method Studios, <a href=”https://vimeo.com/280306052”>Marc Horsfield</a> took the leap to being a studio owner after over two decades in the industry on both the creative and technology sides of a studio, working on projects of all sizes. As an effects animator, he delivered stunning fx for Sam Raimi on Spider-Man 3, which led to opportunities supervising complex sequences on the VES Award-nominated blockbuster San Andreas and the beautiful, heartfelt animated film Happy Feet Two.

“Creating an environment that empowers artists to do their best work is a key part of our studio philosophy,” said Brewer, whose career in production on animated features with name directors like George Miller, Henry Selick and Robert Zemeckis was instrumental in shaping his production management philosophy. “There’s always a great deal of pressure to deliver, but we do our best to find work-life balance, have some fun and at the same time deliver amazing work.”

Brewer spent years with Rovio bringing The Angry Birds Movie to the big screen, committing his tireless dedication to a globally renowned brand with a world class team and talent. His broad experience with story development, team building, production, marketing and merchandising are crucial to the long-term success of Od Studios.

While building a cutting edge vfx division, Od Studios also aims to develop animation intellectual properties for family audiences and beyond.

Brewer noted, “Animation has always connected with younger audiences and those family friendly comedies sell, but the industry can definitely push the medium to achieve deeper, more complex storytelling for all age groups and still turn a profit.”

By starting with a Linux-based pipeline developed in partnership with Leaping Rhino, combined with Horsfield’s years of experience designing high-end global film pipelines, the studio won’t have to spend precious time rebuilding the pipeline as Od Studios grows. Together, the blending of Horsfield and Brewer’s years of combined vfx and animation experience becomes Od Studios, a new dynamic force in the entertainment community.

Learn more at theodstudios.com.

Animation Magazine

Some Drug Abusers Use Relatives to ‘Opioid Shop’

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) — People who are thwarted in their attempts to “shop around” for prescription opioid painkillers at doctors’ offices and pharmacies may try to get the drugs via relatives as a last resort, researchers report.

Some people who misuse opioids go to numerous prescribers and fill prescriptions at multiple pharmacies to avoid detection. But states are cracking down on such “shopping,” forcing them to find other ways of getting the drugs.

The new study suggests some try to get opioids from family members who are prescribed the painkillers. University of Michigan researchers said it’s the first study to examine doctor and pharmacy shopping within families.

For every 200 U.S. patients prescribed opioids in 2016, one had a family member who shopped for opioids, the study found.

The findings underscore the need to reduce the number of opioids available for such diversion by limiting unnecessary prescribing, according to authors of the study published May 10 in the journal JAMA Network Open.

The researchers analyzed 1.4 million opioid prescriptions in 2016 for 554,000 people and relatives covered under the same private family insurance plan.

Of those prescriptions, 0.6% (1 out of 167) were filled by a patient with a family member who met the criteria for opioid shopping — they had received prescriptions from four or more sources and filled them at four or more pharmacies in the past year.

That percentage means that 1.2 million of the 210 million opioid prescriptions in the United States in 2016 may have been dispensed to people who had family members who shopped for opioids, said lead author Dr. Kao-Ping Chua and colleagues.

When researchers defined opioid shopping as getting prescriptions from at least three sources and filling them at three or more pharmacies, 1.9% of opioid prescriptions met that criteria.

For opioid prescriptions to children, 0.2% were filled when the child, doctor and pharmacy met opioid shopping criteria, the study found.

And 0.7% of opioid prescriptions to kids went to those with a family member who met pharmacy shopping criteria. Though researchers can’t be sure from their data, they suspect the adults were often the children’s parents.

Continued

“This apparent doctor and pharmacy shopping behavior in children is likely driven by an adult family member, since children can’t obtain opioid prescriptions from multiple prescribers and fill them at multiple pharmacies on their own,” Chua said in a university news release. He’s a pediatrician and health care researcher at Michigan.

To prevent people who shop for opioids from misusing family members’ medicine, Chua said doctors should not prescribe more doses than patients need, and should order over-the-counter painkillers when possible.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: University of Michigan, news release, May 10, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Pagination

WebMD Health

Many Drug Abusers Use Family Members to ‘Opioid Shop’

FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 — People who are thwarted in their attempts to “shop around” for prescription opioid painkillers at doctors’ offices and pharmacies may try to get the drugs via relatives as a last resort, researchers report.

Some people who misuse opioids go to numerous prescribers and fill prescriptions at multiple pharmacies to avoid detection. But states are cracking down on such “shopping,” forcing them to find other ways of getting the drugs.

The new study suggests some try to get opioids from family members who are prescribed the painkillers. University of Michigan researchers said it’s the first study to examine doctor and pharmacy shopping within families.

For every 200 U.S. patients prescribed opioids in 2016, one had a family member who shopped for opioids, the study found.

The findings underscore the need to reduce the number of opioids available for such diversion by limiting unnecessary prescribing, according to authors of the study published May 10 in the journal JAMA Network Open.

The researchers analyzed 1.4 million opioid prescriptions in 2016 for 554,000 people and relatives covered under the same private family insurance plan.

Of those prescriptions, 0.6% (1 out of 167) were filled by a patient with a family member who met the criteria for opioid shopping — they had received prescriptions from four or more sources and filled them at four or more pharmacies in the past year.

That percentage means that 1.2 million of the 210 million opioid prescriptions in the United States in 2016 may have been dispensed to people who had family members who shopped for opioids, said lead author Dr. Kao-Ping Chua and colleagues.

When researchers defined opioid shopping as getting prescriptions from at least three sources and filling them at three or more pharmacies, 1.9% of opioid prescriptions met that criteria.

For opioid prescriptions to children, 0.2% were filled when the child, doctor and pharmacy met opioid shopping criteria, the study found.

And 0.7% of opioid prescriptions to kids went to those with a family member who met pharmacy shopping criteria. Though researchers can’t be sure from their data, they suspect the adults were often the children’s parents.

“This apparent doctor and pharmacy shopping behavior in children is likely driven by an adult family member, since children can’t obtain opioid prescriptions from multiple prescribers and fill them at multiple pharmacies on their own,” Chua said in a university news release. He’s a pediatrician and health care researcher at Michigan.

To prevent people who shop for opioids from misusing family members’ medicine, Chua said doctors should not prescribe more doses than patients need, and should order over-the-counter painkillers when possible.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on prescription opioids.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: May 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

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