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Kevin Smith Shares Plans for New Netflix ‘He-Man’ Show

Helmer Kevin Smith (Clerks, Jay and Silent Bob Reboot) revealed details about his upcoming Masters of the Universe anime series for Netflix at Power-Con in Anaheim this weekend. He told fans that the new anime series Masters of the Universe: Revelation will debut on Netflix and will feature an original story based on Mattel’s classic 1980s-era He-Man franchise.

Smith will be the new limited series’ executive producer and showrunner.

“I’m Eternia-ly grateful to Mattel TV and Netflix for entrusting me with not only the secrets of Grayskull, but also their entire Universe,” said Smith. “In Revelation, we pick up right where the classic era left off to tell an epic tale of what may be the final battle between He-Man and Skeletor! Brought to life with the most metal character designs Powerhouse Animation can contain in the frame, this is the Masters of the Universe story you always wanted to see as a kid!”

The show will be produced by Mattel Television with Rob David, VP of Mattel TV and author of He-Man: the Eternity War, serving as an executive producer on the series. Series writing staff includes Eric Carrasco (Supergirl), Tim Sheridan (Reign of the Supermen), Diya Mishra (Magic the Gathering) and Marc Bernardin (Alphas). Animation will be produced by Powerhouse Animation (Castlevania).

The growing list of Netflix’s anime series includes Castlevania, Devilman Crybaby, Aggretsuko, Ultraman, Saiki K, Rilakkuma and Kaoru, and Ouran High School Host Club.

Kevin Smith Shares Plans for New Netflix He-Man Show

Kevin Smith Shares Plans for New Netflix He-Man Show

Animation Magazine

Alzheimer’s Genes Might Show Effects in Your 20s

By Alan Mozes

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Every college student misplaces keys or forgets an appointment from time to time. Usually it’s no big deal. But a new study warns that when young people with a family history of Alzheimer’s disease have memory lapses, it could be an early sign of something serious.

That’s the concern raised by a new memory test taken by nearly 60,000 men and women between the ages of 18 and 85.

The results revealed that participants between 18 and 65 who had family members with Alzheimer’s scored lower than those who did not. That included even young adults in their 20s.

But, “no one should feel doomed to experience Alzheimer’s, certainly not simply because your parents or grandparents were diagnosed with the disease,” stressed study author Matt Huentelman. He is a professor of neurogenomics with TGen, a genetics research institute based in Phoenix.

Lots of non-inherited factors play a role in Alzheimer’s risk, he explained. And, “there are many cases of people with family history and/or high genetic risk for Alzheimer’s who live long lives without memory problems.”

But there’s no getting around the fact that roughly 75% of Alzheimer’s risk is thought to be driven by genetics, said Huentelman. And the test does suggest that a young person’s memory may be impacted by genetic risk “as many as four decades before the typical onset of Alzheimer’s disease,” he added.

The test results and analysis were published online recently in the journal eLife.

Huentelman and his colleagues pointed out that more than 5 million Americans now live with Alzheimer’s. By 2050, that number is expected to nearly triple, approaching 14 million. The disorder is the leading cause of dementia, and has no known treatment or cure.

To get a better handle on how a family history of Alzheimer’s might affect future risk, the team launched an online word memory test in 2013.

Called “MindCrowd,” the launch got a big publicity boost from celebrities such as Lynda Carter, Valerie Bertinelli and Ashton Kutcher, who spread the word via social media.

Continued

By August 2018, nearly 60,000 people had signed up in all 50 states and across 150 countries. Most (92%) were white.

The analysis is based on that figure, although the ongoing project has now tested 116,000 recruits.

Test takers were shown 12 sets of two linked words. Afterwards just one word was randomly displayed, and everyone was asked to recall the missing word. The process was repeated three times.

In addition, participants provided information on their health and their family’s health.

Nearly 5,000 participants who reported a family history of Alzheimer’s also provided a blood or saliva sample. Samples were measured for levels of a particular protein (apolipoprotein E, or APOE) long associated with Alzheimer’s risk.

In the end, the team found a clear link between having a family history of Alzheimer’s and lower memory test scores.

However, “it is important to note that our test isn’t a clinical diagnostic test for dementia,” said Huentelman. “It isn’t designed to diagnose Alzheimer’s. It is also important to note that the differences we see are significant, yet subtle. So, they are unlikely to affect the daily living activities of any of these young individuals.”

Still, the link is real, he said, and “we need to conduct research like ours to start trying new things to make headway towards treatments and cures.”

Huentelman emphasized “that there are a few things we know that are good for the brain and can help reduce the risk of dementia.”

He said those include exercising, getting good sleep, eating a nutritious diet, being socially active, and avoiding smoking and lifestyle choices that could lead to diabetes or heart disease.

Such prevention efforts were endorsed by Keith Fargo, director of scientific programs and outreach with the Alzheimer’s Association.

But Fargo also advised against reading too much into the findings.

“While genetics certainly play a role in risk for Alzheimer’s disease, there is not a single number that clinicians or researchers agree upon yet to describe the size of that role,” he said. “The fact is that it is almost impossible to predict whether any particular individual will develop Alzheimer’s or not.”

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Matt Huentelman, Ph.D., professor, neurogenomics division, and head, neurobehavioral research unit, TGen, Phoenix; Keith Fargo, Ph.D., director, scientific programs & outreach, Alzheimer’s Association, New York City; June 18, 2019,eLife, online

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Pagination

WebMD Health

Carl Jones and Brian Ash Chat About Their New Show ‘Sugar & Toys’

Whatever happened to the poorly animated Saturday morning TV shows of the ‘80s and ‘90s?  An irreverent new series called Sugar & Toys puts a mad spin on those toons, offering timely culture parodies, commercial spoofs and PSAs, and even satirical live-action bits. The 10 x 30-minute series, which is created by Carl Jones and Brain Ash of Black Dynamite and The Boondocks fame will debut this month on Fuse TV. Bookended by segments featuring rapper/actor Kyle (The After Party), Sugar & Toys promises to bring a lot of timely absurdist humor to the toon table.

Carl Jones, who is also exec producer on the new Adult Swim show Lazor Wulf, says the origins of the show go back years ago, when he and a network executive where talking about Saturday morning cartoons. “We were wondering what happened to those old cartoons which disappeared because people became more aware of the problem of childhood obesity,” he says. “The only reason these cartoons existed was because these big companies wanted to sell their sugar-coated cereals and candies and toys to children on TV. Even the toys they sold were toxic. So Brian and I started kicking around this idea of doing a parody cartoon block which had the aesthetics of the cartoons from the ’80s and ’90s, but with an adult audience in mind.”

Ash says he and Jones have always been driven to shows that serve up hard-hitting humor and social commentary. “Mad Magazine was a big influence on us,” he notes. “It’s the kind of humor that if you get all the cultural references, you get rewarded. But even if you’re young and don’t get them all, you discover a lot of cool things about culture via these parodies.

Sugar & Toys

Sugar & Toys

Fast, Furious and Funny

Jones and Ash point out that because the way animation is consumed online these days, it’s easier to produce and deliver fast-moving byte-sized parodies. “We can jump all over the map,” says Jones. “We also had this fun notion of mixing in live-action segments with the cartoon parts, so we can explore all kinds of possibilities. We have spoofs of commercials and have these quick bits, just like Chappelle’s Show. We’re also lucky to have segments featuring Kyle, directed by Nich Goossen.”

While having so many different moving parts, Sugar & Toys has been a very fast-and-furious production. The team only began work on the series over a year ago. “In the beginning, we thought we were only doing a pilot,” recalls Ash. “But then we got the greenlight for six episodes, which then got extended to ten. Fuse got behind our show in a big way and let us go to town. We hit the ground running. We wrote the pilot in October, and we’re airing in June. We’re used to longer development time. The Boondocks took 18 months to two years to do, so this has been incredible.”

The show’s animation is being handled by a St. Petersburg, Florida-based studio Echo Bridge, led by Esteban Valdez. “They’re the best kept-secret in the world of animation,” says Jones. “They do Flash, Toon Boom Harmony, even some CG, and fit the needs of our show perfectly. The overall style of the show is old-school Hanna-Barbera Saturday Morning show, and Echo Bridge does a great job with it.”

Overall, about 70 percent of the show is animated and the remaining parts are live-action. A typical 21-minute show features about 12 to 13 fast-paced sketches. The longest sketch is called “Lost Dreamers” and follows the misadventures of a Latinx character who is deported on Cinco de Mayo, and has to time travel to escape ICE, ending up in ancient version of San Bernadino, Calif.

“It’s like a taster’s menu at a restaurant,” says Ash. “Some sketches come back because we have more to say, and we have the production experience, building and rigging of the characters. It’s a lot like Saturday Night Live with a much more truncated schedule. The beauty of a sketch show is that if you have a favorite bit that is funny, it will probably come back. And if there’s something that you don’t like, well, it only lasts a minute or two, and you’ll be enjoying a new sketch in no time!”

Sugar & Toys

Sugar & Toys

Jones and Ash have learned a lot during this process. “It almost feels like we’re going two shows at once—one animated and the other live-action,” says Jones. “It’s quite a task to navigate as there are lots of moving pieces. But we’re very proud of the entire team cross the board. You are producing these really short form originals, and you may never see these animated characters again. We also have an amazing ensemble cast handling all the voices, and Fuse has been very supportive of our creative vision. The content is going to be definitely disruptive. It’s going to shake things up and cause a lot of conversation. We are presenting very honest material, and it’s amazing that they let us do what we do!”

Ash agrees. “One of the challenges of the format is to address youth and hip hop culture and to stay relevant,” he notes. “We want to speak to what is going on around us, and speak to this culture in a contemporary way. Over the last few years we’ve had this renaissance of rappers doing some interesting work. We run into these young talented people who grew up watching Boondocks and Black Dynamite. There’s this audience whose conversation is informed by things we’d done before. And their work is informing what we are doing with this show. To influence and be influenced by these young people is very important to us. We do come from a sincere place, so even when do shocking humor, these things matter to us. Animation and comedy let us expose some uncomfortable truths around us.”

The creative producers are also both quite pleased with what animators of colors have been able to achieve over the past few years. “I feel really good about it overall, but we still have a long way to go, “ says Jones. “It was so refreshing to see the new Spider-Man movie. It just blew me away, because I never imagined I would see the Spider-Man brand contextualized that way. There are so many talented, writers, directors, animators and people of color in this space who haven’t had the opportunity or voice or platform. But to see so many people of color at Comic-Con or on a panel, for example, is wonderful. It’s great for young people to see that and have all this original content speak to the directly. That’s moving the culture forward.”

He also mentions that there still needs to be a lot more visibility for women of color in the animation world. “There’s more to be down for women of color,” adds Jones. “There are some amazing storytellers and artists out there that are not being recognized. Many of these women are working on male-drive shows. We need to see the floodgates opened for more. These characters are universal, and they speak to everyone.”

Sugar & Toys airs Sundays at 11 p.m. on Fuse TV.

“The content is going to be definitely disruptive. It’s going to shake things up and cause a lot of conversation.”
— Exec producer Carl Jones

“To influence and be influenced by these young people is very important to us. We do come from a sincere place, so even when do shocking humor, these things matter to us. Animation and comedy let us expose some uncomfortable truths around us.”
— Exec producer Brian Ash

Carl Jones (left) and Brian Ash (right)

Carl Jones (left) and Brian Ash (right)

Animation Magazine

Rheumatoid Arthritis Signs Can Show Up Early

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Difficulties with daily activities such as dressing, walking and eating can be seen in rheumatoid arthritis patients a year or two before they’re diagnosed, a new study shows.

“This is a new finding, and a finding that is quite intriguing,” said lead author Dr. Elena Myasoedova, a rheumatologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

“It may reflect an accumulation of symptoms between the time of first onset and the time required for providers to actually diagnose patients,” she said in a Mayo news release.

The study also found that chronic increased levels of difficulty with daily activities (functional disability) continued even after patients were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and began treatment.

That may be due to a number of factors, including increasing physical and mental pain, use of treatments such as glucocorticoids and antidepressants, and anticipation of relief from symptoms, she added.

For the study, the researchers looked at 586 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 531 people without the disease in the Rochester Epidemiology Project database of medical records.

The rate of functional disability was more than two times higher among rheumatoid arthritis patients than in those without rheumatoid arthritis. In most age groups, rheumatoid arthritis patients had a 15% or higher rate of functional disability than those without the disease.

The findings show the importance of early treatment for rheumatoid arthritis patients, according to Myasoedova.

“Alerting your health care provider to difficulties in daily living can assure that patients receive the help they need,” she said.

About 1.5 million Americans have been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease that most often affects the joints but can also impact other parts of the body. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common chronic conditions associated with functional disability in the United States, and has a significant impact on well-being and quality of life.

Symptoms can include joint pain or swelling, but 40% of patients have symptoms that don’t involve the joints, such as fatigue, fever and loss of appetite.

The study will be published in June in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: Mayo Clinic, news release, May 1, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });
WebMD Health

Signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Show Up Long Before Diagnosis

FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 — Difficulties with daily activities such as dressing, walking and eating can be seen in rheumatoid arthritis patients a year or two before they’re diagnosed, a new study shows.

“This is a new finding, and a finding that is quite intriguing,” said lead author Dr. Elena Myasoedova, a rheumatologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

“It may reflect an accumulation of symptoms between the time of first onset and the time required for providers to actually diagnose patients,” she said in a Mayo news release.

The study also found that chronic increased levels of difficulty with daily activities (functional disability) continued even after patients were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and began treatment.

That may be due to a number of factors, including increasing physical and mental pain, use of treatments such as glucocorticoids and antidepressants, and anticipation of relief from symptoms, she added.

For the study, the researchers looked at 586 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 531 people without the disease in the Rochester Epidemiology Project database of medical records.

The rate of functional disability was more than two times higher among rheumatoid arthritis patients than in those without rheumatoid arthritis. In most age groups, rheumatoid arthritis patients had a 15% or higher rate of functional disability than those without the disease.

The findings show the importance of early treatment for rheumatoid arthritis patients, according to Myasoedova.

“Alerting your health care provider to difficulties in daily living can assure that patients receive the help they need,” she said.

About 1.5 million Americans have been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease that most often affects the joints but can also impact other parts of the body. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common chronic conditions associated with functional disability in the United States, and has a significant impact on well-being and quality of life.

Symptoms can include joint pain or swelling, but 40% of patients have symptoms that don’t involve the joints, such as fatigue, fever and loss of appetite.

The study will be published in June in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on rheumatoid arthritis.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: May 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

CalArts 2019 Producers’ Show Spotlights Animation’s Next Generation

The talented animated filmmakers of tomorrow took center stage this week as California Institute of the Arts (CalArts) celebrates the 2019 edition of its always highly-anticipated Producers’ Show. Presented by the School of Film/Video, the showcase premieres the top student films from CalArts’ celebrated Character Animation Program.

The annual screening and awards event was attended by a who’s-who of high-profile CalArts animation alumni, industry representatives, and an assortment of enthusiastic students and recent graduates. For the May 8 event, the audience included contingents from Walt Disney Animation Studios, Pixar Animation Studios, Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, Warner Bros., Luma Pictures, Women in Animation, and the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media Research among many other leading studios and influencers.

Held at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater of the Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences, the event showcased 19 films selected from 190 submissions which were screened to a crowd of nearly 900.

Making his return to the Goldwyn Theater after his Oscar success, the evening’s guest of honor was CalArts alumnus Bob Persichetti, one of three directors of this year’s Best Animated Feature Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. He is the 12th “CalArtian” to take home an Academy Award in this category. Persichetti recognized the night’s three award-winning films by students who just might be tomorrow’s Oscar recipients.

The Walter and Gracie Lantz Animation Prize, juried by Character Animation Program faculty, went to Lorenzo Fresta for his film Walter.

Recipient of The Vimeo Award for Outstanding Student Achievement in Animated Filmmaking, juried by Vimeo, was Victoria Vincent for dead end.

The Peers’ Pick Award, voted by the students, was given to Julia Rodrigues, for Kukuru.

dead end from vewn on Vimeo.

Maija Burnett, Director of the Character Animation Program, commented, “We are thrilled that Bob came back to inspire our students with his story. And I am so proud of all the participants in this year’s show, and all students in our program. They started this past fall semester by creating short films in one week, and continued working throughout the year on the exceptional films we are introducing at Producer’s Show 2019. Each film reflects their unique perspectives on storytelling, artistic style and cinematic technique — and reflects CalArts’ creative spirit.”

Calarts’ Experimental Animation Showcase will present a selection of 17 short films on Friday, May 10, 2019 at REDCAT (Roy and Edna Disney CalArts Theater). This year’;s selection committee included faculty Maureen Furniss, Pia Borg, Hillary Kapan, Lei Lei, Alexander Stewart, and student Jonnï phillips.

View all the 2019 student films from CalArts Character Animation Program here.

Walter

Walter

Kukuru

Kukuru

Animation Magazine

Astronaut Twins Show Space Travel Doesn’t Bring Lasting Biological Changes

THURSDAY, April 11, 2019 — NASA astronaut Scott Kelly spent a year on the International Space Station. His twin brother, fellow astronaut Mark Kelly, stayed on the ground.

And a large, interdisciplinary research team tracked the health and biology of both men, in a groundbreaking attempt to observe the effects of spaceflight on the human body.

There’s a lot in space that can affect your health. Radiation, space station air quality, zero gravity and the stress of being trapped in a closed environment far from home can all take a toll.

What researchers discovered is pretty reassuring for near-Earth space travel — while Scott’s body did undergo some changes compared with Mark, things went back pretty much to normal once he returned home.

“I think it’s reassuring to know that when you come back things will largely be back to the same,” said researcher Michael Snyder, chair of genetics at Stanford University School of Medicine. “So I think that’s the No. 1 message.”

For example, Scott experienced a large-scale shift in the way his genes expressed themselves while he was in space, but it didn’t seem to affect his health and largely went back to normal upon his return, researchers said.

“We saw that the vast majority, over 90%, of all these changes all returned back to baseline coming back to Earth,” said researcher Chris Mason, an associate professor of genetics with Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City.

Changes to cellular aging?

The most lasting change occurred in Scott Kelly’s telomeres, the protective caps on the end of chromosomes, said researcher Susan Bailey, a professor with the Colorado State University Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Services.

Think of telomeres as similar to the plastic tips on the end of shoelaces — they keep chromosomes from unraveling and causing damage to healthy cells. Shorter telomeres put a person at higher risk for accelerated aging, and for age-related diseases like heart problems and cancer, Bailey said.

Space travel had an elastic effect upon Scott Kelly’s telomeres that his brother Mark didn’t experience, despite their identical genetics.

“Scott’s telomeres were longer during spaceflight than they were either before or after,” Bailey said. “We also saw a very rapid decrease in telomere length upon his return to Earth.”

Scott Kelly continues to carry shorter telomeres after flight than he had before, Bailey added.

“From the perspective of aging and health risks, that could be where he might be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, for example, or some types of cancer, too,” Bailey said.

Unprecedented collaborative study

The idea for the NASA Twins Study came from Scott Kelly himself, during preparations for his 340-day-long mission in space with Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, said co-lead investigator Dr. Andrew Feinberg, director of the Center for Epigenetics at Johns Hopkins University.

Kelly and Kornienko left Earth for the space station in March 2015 and returned in March 2016.

The Twins Study encompassed 10 separate research teams that thoroughly tracked the health and biology of both Scott in space and Mark on the ground.

Some other findings from the study:

  • Scott’s carotid artery wall became thicker during the mission, which is considered a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, said researcher Stuart Lee, lead scientist for KBRwyle, a contractor supporting the cardiovascular and vision laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center.
  • A flu vaccine administered in space worked exactly as it would on Earth, indicating that the immune system is not significantly compromised outside the planet.
  • Changes in the makeup of Scott’s stomach bacteria in space were no greater than stress-related changes scientists observe on Earth.

Scott experienced some changes to his vision and the shape of his eyeball, including a thicker retinal nerve and folds in the choroid layer that surrounds the eye, possibly due to the effects of zero gravity on fluids in the body.

About 40% of astronauts experience these sort of vision changes, said Lee. It’s occurred in other male astronauts, but not females.

Researchers expect that “those are probably some permanent changes that won’t resolve over time,” Lee said.

‘Deep space’ effects still unknown

This study provides a first glimpse into the effects of space travel on humans, but cannot predict what might happen people as they venture into deep space, the researchers cautioned.

“This is not the environment that the astronauts are going to be facing when they go to Mars,” Feinberg said, noting that the International Space Station is close enough to Earth to shield it from deep space radiation. “We don’t have much experience with people leaving that protective shell.”

“We need to get outside of low Earth orbit and we need for the astronauts to spend longer periods of time to really evaluate some of these health effects,” Bailey added. “The radiation exposure will certainly be a big concern as they get outside of the protection of the Earth.”

The findings from the study were published April 12 in the journal Science.

In this video, Bailey outlines her research with the twins on the effects of space on the human body:

Credit: Jason Russell/Colorado State University

More information

NASA has more on humans in space.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: April 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Guys, Can You Give Us 40? It May Show Heart Health

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Feb. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) — If you’re a 40-something guy and can’t do 40 push-ups in a row, maybe it’s time to do something about it.

A new study suggests the number of push-ups a middle-aged man can perform might be an indication of his overall heart health.

Men who can do more than 40 at a time have a 96 percent reduced risk of heart attack, stroke and heart disease compared with men who could muster fewer than 10, according to findings published online Feb. 15 in JAMA Network Open.

“There was basically a dose response,” said senior researcher Dr. Stefanos Kales, a professor of environmental health at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. “The more pushups you could do, the less likely you were to have a heart disease event.”

It appears that push-up capacity may be a “marker of general physical fitness,” Kales said.

“As you can well imagine, there are people who are world-class marathon runners who can’t do very many pushups, and there might be people who are bodybuilders that can do a lot of push-ups but can’t run very well,” he added. “But we found in this study and other studies we’ve done, in general, push-up capacity and aerobic capacity are pretty well correlated.”

For the study, Kales’ team tracked the heart health of just over 1,100 active male firefighters for a decade, starting in 2000. The average age of the participants was about 40 at the study’s start, and the group had an average body mass index (BMI) of 28.7, which is overweight. BMI is a measure of body fat based on height and weight.

The men’s push-up capacity was measured at the study’s start, and participants also underwent a treadmill test to check their aerobic capacity. Each man then underwent yearly physicals and filled out health questionnaires.

During the 10-year follow-up, 37 men developed heart health problems, the findings showed.

The researchers broke the men into five groups, based on increments of 10 push-ups, and ran the numbers to see if their push-up capacity accurately predicted heart problems.

Continued

Even after adjusting for age and BMI, the investigators found that the number of push-ups a man could perform predicted their risk of heart problems. Push-up capacity was more strongly associated with heart health than aerobic capacity as measured by a standard treadmill test, the study authors said.

Even so, doctors are likely to continue relying on stress treadmill tests as a measure of heart health, said Dr. Satjit Bhusri, a cardiologist with Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

“I agree with the authors that push-up performance can correlate with stress testing,” Bhusri said. “However, the tremendous data and information accumulated with stress testing still makes it the gold standard.”

Because the study only involved men, its results can’t be applied to women. Kales suspects there would be a similar relationship, but it might have to be measured differently.

The push-up test might not accurately predict heart problems for everyone, added Dr. Gerald Fletcher, a professor of cardiovascular medicine with the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla.

“That’s not a good measurement, it really isn’t, because many people have had musculoskeletal injuries,” Fletcher said. “Some people have problems with their arms. I have an arm injury from when I was playing high school football, so I don’t use my arms that much to do push-ups.”

According to Dr. Guy Mintz, push-ups might be a better assessment for “physical fitness and cardiovascular health in professions that require increased physical abilities, such as police officers, firefighters or sanitation workers.” Mintz is director of cardiovascular health and lipidology at Northwell Health’s Sandra Atlas Bass Heart Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y.

Fletcher suggested that people who want to protect their heart health should try to get in 25 to 30 minutes of aerobic exercise most days of the week. Examples include walking on a treadmill, riding a stationary bike, or working out on an elliptical machine.

Mintz recommends the “rule of fours” to his patients.

“This is 40 minutes of continuous aerobic activity at least four times per week to provide four benefits — including improvement of blood pressure, cholesterol, weight and blood sugar — leading to better cardiovascular health,” Mintz said.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Stefanos Kales, M.D., M.P.H., professor of environmental health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston; Satjit Bhusri, M.D., cardiologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Gerald Fletcher, M.D.,  professor of cardiovascular medicine, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla.;  Guy Mintz, M.D., director of cardiovascular health and lipidology, Northwell Health’s Sandra Atlas Bass Heart Hospital, Manhasset, N.Y.; Feb. 15, 2019,JAMA Network Open, online

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

Pagination

WebMD Health

Wonderful World of Animation Show Opens May 1 at Disney’s Hollywood Studios

Walt Disney World has announced that the new nighttime show Wonderful World of Animation will be lighting up the skies over Disney’s Hollywood Studios starting May 1. The spectacle will play out above the soon to be opened new Mickey & Minnie’s Runaway Railway attraction.

First announced by Parks Chairman Bob Chapek during D23’s Destination D: Celebrating Mickey Mouse in November, Wonderful World of Animation will be a cinematic nighttime experience featuring state-of-the-art projection technology that will “take guests on a magical journey through more than 90 years of Disney animation.”

The premiere will be extra celebratory, as May 1 marks the 30th anniversary of Disney’s Hollywood Studios.

Mickey & Minnie’s Runaway Railway will be the first ride-through attraction themed on the iconic mouse couple, styled after Disney Channel’s Emmy-winning Mickey Mouse shorts. The ride will feature a new, original story and theme song as it transports guests inside the wacky world of the cartoons.

This year will see the opening of a number of other exciting attractions at Disney’s Hollywood Studios. Lightning McQueen’s Racing Academy will let fans meet the racing legend from Cars and learn all about the art of the track from his own experience. Party with Pixar Pals kicks off January 18, a dance party hosted by The Incredibles (and special guest Edna Mode) at Pixar Avenue. Monsters, Inc. stars Mike and Sulley will be greeting guests at Walt Disney Presents.

And of course, Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge will take the park to another star system with a new land packed with thrills, including Millennium Falcon: Smugglers Run and Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance.

[Source: Inside the Magic]

Mickey & Minnie’s Runaway Railway

Mickey & Minnie’s Runaway Railway

Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge

Animation Magazine

New Teaser, Images Released for Titmouse’s ‘Tongue & Pencil’ Show

We have a new teaser and images releases for The Tongue & Pencil Show, Titmouse’s new web series about the art and creative forces of animation. The show which is hosted by studio co-founder Chris Prynoski, features casual conversations with animators and artists about their art, work and lives.

The show is comprised of 24 episodes of 40-60 minute filmed over the last few years, rolling out every Monday on a dedicated YouTube channel. The first episode features Metalocalypse director Jon Schnepp, who died in July from complications of a stroke at just 51 years old. The first season also feature Pete Browngardt (creator, Uncle Grandpa), animator Mike Carlo, animator Devin Flynn, character designer Kali FontecchioJorge Gutierrez (director, The Book of Life), comics artist Lawrence HubbardChristy Karacas (creator, Ballmastrz: 9009), animator Luke McGarry, actress Kate Micucci, illustrator Travis MillardTomm Moore (director, Song of the Sea), artist Nasty Neckface, animator Jeremy PolgarJohnny Ryan (co-creator, Pig Goat Banana Cricket), animator Jody Schaeffer, animator Parker SimmonsBrendon Small (co-creator, Metalocalypse), Sean Solomon (art director, Lucas Bros. Moving Co.), animator Jamie VickersJ.J. Villard (director, King Star King), Pen Ward(creator, Adventure Time), animator Max Winston (director, I Live in the Woods) and Masaaki Yuasa (director, Lu over the Wall).

Each Tongue and Pencil session results in two pieces of original collaborative artwork, which Titmouse will auction to raise money for a grant for emerging talent in animation, comics and fine art. Interested artists should email [email protected] for more information on how to apply.

You can catch the new show trailer herehttps://youtu.be/FS-PsjkF9TY

Here’s the sneak peek at the artwork from episode 106, completed by Luke McGarry and Prynoski:

Tongue & Pencil

Tongue & Pencil

Tongue & Pencil

Tongue & Pencil

Animation Magazine

Titmouse Launches Toon Talk Show ‘Tongue and Pencil’

Acclaimed animation studio Titmouse (The Venture Bros., Big Mouth) has launched a talk show style webseries about animation, announced during the tribute for studio co-founder Chris Prynoski at the Los Angeles Animation Festival. Prynoski hosts the series, titled Tongue and Pencil, in which he sits down for drinks and doodling in the studio with artist friends to talk about their work and lives.

The show is comprised of 24 episodes of 40-60 minute filmed over the last few years, rolling out every Monday on a dedicated YouTube channel. The first episode, launched this weekend, features Metalocalypse director Jon Schnepp, who died in July from complications of a stroke at just 51 years old.

The first season will also feature Pete Browngardt (creator, Uncle Grandpa), animator Mike Carlo, animator Devin Flynn, character designer Kali Fontecchio, Jorge Gutierrez (director, The Book of Life), comics artist Lawrence Hubbard, Christy Karacas (creator, Ballmastrz: 9009), animator Luke McGarry, actress Kate Micucci, illustrator Travis Millard, Tomm Moore (director, Song of the Sea), artist Nasty Neckface, animator Jeremy Polgar, Johnny Ryan (co-creator, Pig Goat Banana Cricket), animator Jody Schaeffer, animator Parker Simmons, Brendon Small (co-creator, Metalocalypse), Sean Solomon (art director, Lucas Bros. Moving Co.), animator Jamie Vickers, J.J. Villard (director, King Star King), Pen Ward (creator, Adventure Time), animator Max Winston (director, I Live in the Woods) and Masaaki Yuasa (director, Lu over the Wall).

[Source: Cartoon Brew]

Animation Magazine

That Cannabis Show makes mid-September debut in Springfield, Massachusetts

MPP’s Matt Simon will lead panel discussion Saturday, September 15 — premium tickets available at a discount for MPP supporters!

Join MPP at That Cannabis Show September 15 and 16 in Springfield, Massachusetts! On Saturday, September 15, at 1:30 p.m., MPP’s New England Political Director, Matt Simon, will host a panel discussion exploring the status of legalization and regulation efforts in the six New England states and New York. The panel, titled “The Laws: They Are A-Changing,” will feature state legislators and leading reform advocates from several states. See below for information on the event and how to register.

Show details:

What: That Cannabis Show
Where: The MassMutual Center, 1277 Main Street, Springfield, MA
When: September 15 and 16

What to expect:

A bustling tradeshow floor
Business-focused programming
Entrepreneurs’ resource row
Celebrity talent
CannaBliss film festival
Mainstage entertainment

Click here to purchase tickets, and use code MPP for a 50% discount on all premium tickets!

We hope to see you there!

The post That Cannabis Show makes mid-September debut in Springfield, Massachusetts appeared first on MPP Blog.


MPP Blog

‘Miraculous’ Nabs Best Animated Show Prize at Teen Choice Awards

Intl. indie animation studio ZAG won the Best Animated TV Show award at the recent Teen Choice Awards for its show ZAG HEROEZ Miraculous: Tales of Ladybug & Cat Noir, winning more votes than series such as Family GuyRick and Morty and The Simpsons. Winners of the Teen Choice Awards are selected by teens across the U.S. who hold the voting power to select their favorite movies, TV shows, video games, music and animated series among others.

“We are so thrilled that Miraculous has been chosen by fan vote as Choice Animated TV Show,” says Jeremy Zag, CEO and Founder for ZAG. “I want to give a special thank you to my magical teams and incredible partners in EUROPE, USA, LATAM and ASIA. We couldn’t have made it without their support. Most importantly, special big love to the best fan base in the world!!!”

Miraculous was created by ZAG/Zagtoon in collaboration with Method Animation. The popular toon airs over 120 countries worldwide, regularly scoring top rankings and lifting overall network ratings with key broadcast partners such as Netflix and KidsClickTV in the USA, Disney EMEA & Latin America, France’s TF1, UK’s POP, Italy’s Super! and Brazil’s Gloob!

ZAG HEROEZ MiraculousTales of Ladybug & Cat Noir is a 133 x 22’ series that follows he adventures of two seemingly typical teens with secret identities, Marinette and Adrien, who transform into superheroes, Ladybug and Cat Noir, when evil threatens Paris. Season’s two and three of  the show are co-produced by Zagtoon, France’s Method Animation, South Korea’s SamG Animation, SK Broadband, Japan’s Toei Animation and Italy’s DeAgostini Editore S.P.A., in collaboration with Disney Channel EMEA, French broadcaster TF1, Brazil’s Globosat and AB. The series is distributed internationally by PGS Entertainment, Groupe AB, Zagtoon, Method, and SamG Animation.

Animation Magazine

What It’s Like to See the Future of Marijuana at NCIA Trade Show

One of the largest cannabis business development groups to assist new companies is the National Cannabis Industry Association (NCIA). Each year, the group presents three conferences aimed at educating business leaders about the latest developments in the cannabis industry. The Cannabis Business Summit and Expo took place July 25-27, 2018, in downtown San Jose at […]
Marijuana