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TV Binges, Video Games, Books and Sports Taking Toll on Sleep

SUNDAY, Nov. 10, 2019 — Nearly nine in 10 American adults lose sleep to binge watch TV, a new survey finds.

The more than 2,000 U.S. adults who took part in the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) poll in September ranked sleep as their second-highest priority, with family being first.

But despite considering sleep important, 88% said they’d stayed up late to watch multiple episodes of a TV show or streaming series.

The rate was highest (95%) among 18- to 44-year-olds. Many also delay bedtime to play video games, read and watch sports, the survey revealed.

“It’s encouraging that Americans rank sleep as one of their highest priorities, but choosing to binge on entertainment at night instead of sleeping has serious ramifications,” AASM president Dr. Kelly Carden said in an academy news release.

Younger adults (aged 18 to 34) were more likely than those 35 and older to have stayed up late to play video games (72% versus 38%), and men were more likely to do so than women (59% versus 42%).

Two-thirds of respondents said they’d lost sleep to read. Women were more likely to do so than men (71% versus 61%), the survey found.

Nearly 60% of adults lost sleep to watch sports, including 75% of men and 45% of women. Adults between 25 and 54 years of age were more likely than those in other age groups to have stayed up late for overtime or extra innings (54% versus 51%).

That lost shut-eye can have serious consequences, Carden said.

“Sleep is essential to health, well-being and safety, and chronic insufficient sleep can lead to an increased risk of health problems, mood disorders and motor vehicle accidents,” she pointed out.

Losing sleep due to streaming, reading or playing video games can also lead to negative feelings. For example, 24% of respondents admitted feeling frustrated after delaying their bedtimes.

Feeling bad was most common for those in Generation Z (born in 1997 or later), who said that staying up late caused frustration (32%), worry (23%) and guilt (19%).

Such feelings can make it harder to drift off, especially if a person tries to make up for the lost sleep, according to the AASM.

The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 2 percentage points and a confidence level of 95%.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on sleep.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: November 2019

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With Time Change, Use That Extra Hour for Sleep

By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Nov. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) — When the clocks fall back this Sunday, more than 4 in 10 Americans plan to sleep during that extra hour, a new survey finds.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) asked more than 2,000 adults what they plan to do with the extra hour when daylight saving time ends on Nov. 3.

Sleep was the top response (41%), followed by spending the extra hour with friends and family (13%) enjoying a relaxing activity (13%), doing housework and running errands (6%), and catching up on work or studies (5%).

“It’s encouraging that people are waking up to the importance of sleep for their health and well-being,” AASM president Dr. Kelly Carden said in an academy news release. “The end of daylight saving time is a good reminder that sleep is essential for health, and it is an opportunity to make a commitment to talk to a medical provider about any ongoing sleep problems.”

While getting an extra hour of sleep won’t eliminate a sleep deficit, waking up feeling more refreshed and alert after the time change may help motivate people to give sleep greater priority, Carden added.

Sleep needs vary among people, but everyone should ensure they get enough sleep regularly to wake feeling refreshed and alert, according to the AASM.

If you consistently wake up feeling unrefreshed, or have difficulty staying awake throughout the day, it’s a warning sign that you are not getting enough sleep or that you may have a sleep disorder.

If you’re sleep-deprived and want to get an extra hour of sleep when daylight saving time ends, the academy suggests this strategy.

Don’t change your clocks until it’s time for bed. Go to bed at your usual bedtime. Just before getting into bed, set your clocks back one hour. Wake up at your regular wake time, which means you’ll have had an extra hour of sleep. Take note of how much better you feel after that extra sleep time.

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Sources

SOURCE: American Academy of Sleep Medicine, news release, October 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Sleep Position Unlikely to Harm Baby in Pregnancy

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Pregnant women are often told to sleep on their left side to reduce the risk of stillbirth, but new research suggests they can choose whatever position is most comfortable through most of the pregnancy.

“We can reassure women that through 30 weeks of pregnancy, different sleep positions are safe,” said study lead author Dr. Robert Silver, chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Utah School of Medicine.

Silver said the study didn’t include women past 30 weeks, so researchers can’t make any definitive statements about the last weeks of pregnancy.

The research is being published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology and ahead of print online Sept. 10.

Why have women been encouraged to sleep on their left sides, particularly since sleeping during pregnancy can already be uncomfortable and difficult?

There is a known phenomenon that can limit blood flow during labor if a woman lies flat on her back, explained Dr. Nathan Fox, associate clinical professor in obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive science at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

At the end of pregnancy, a woman’s uterus and the baby take up a large portion of the body. If a woman lies flat on her back during labor, it’s possible to compress blood vessels underneath. That could lead to decreased circulation and a drop in the baby’s heart rate. To counteract this, women are positioned slightly to the side, said Fox, who coauthored an editorial published with the study.

Past researchers suspected that maybe a similar thing happens in women who have stillbirth, when a fetus dies in the womb. Previous studies asked women who’d had stillbirth to try to recall how they slept while pregnant. Those studies found a significant link between certain sleep positions, such as on the back, and stillbirth.

But Fox explained that it’s difficult for people to remember what they did in the past, and even more so after a tragedy like stillbirth.

The new study was designed differently. Just over 8,700 women were asked at several points during pregnancy about their sleep positions. About one-third also underwent a sleep study where their positions were recorded, Silver said.

Continued

Researchers looked for a number of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including stillbirth, high blood pressure disorders, and having a baby small for its gestational age. Twenty-two percent of women in the study had these outcomes.

Yet when researchers compared these pregnancy complications to a woman’s sleep position, they didn’t find a link.

Silver said this research needs to be done in later pregnancy to see if the results are the same.

“Women should try to sleep in whatever position is most comfortable for them,” Fox said. “And we [the medical community] need to be cautious when giving recommendations about what to do in everyday life. Consider what is the evidence supporting that recommendation.”

He noted public health campaigns encouraging women to sleep on their left side during pregnancy.

“It’s hard to forecast the outcome of such recommendations where people have good intentions, like preventing stillbirth. The intervention may seem simple or benign, but it can potentially inconvenience a lot of people. Making sleep more difficult in pregnancy may have an impact on a woman’s health. And, if something horrible happens, it’s difficult to convince women that it wasn’t somehow their fault,” Fox said.

His editorial concluded: “This harm to women already suffering from sadness and despair must not be minimized.”

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Robert Silver, M.D., chairman, obstetrics and gynecology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City; Nathan Fox, M.D., associate clinical professor, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, and vice president, Maternal Fetal Medicine Associates, New York City;Obstetrics & Gynecology, October 2019, online Sept. 10, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Is Your Mattress Releasing Toxins While You Sleep?

WEDNESDAY, July 10, 2019 — Most people consider their bed a safe haven, but new research suggests your body heat might trigger the release of potentially harmful chemicals from your mattress.

Mattresses are known to release minute amounts of gaseous chemicals called volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These VOCs come mainly from the polyurethane used in the mattress, but also from other chemicals used in flame retardants and plastics, the researchers said.

Unfortunately, your body heat appears to increase VOC emissions from your mattress, according to tests conducted on eight different types of polyurethane mattresses.

But don’t toss out your mattress just yet: The estimated doses of most VOCs remained well below the levels that could cause health effects, researchers noted.

However, some compounds did reach levels of concern for infants and young children, if their ages were considered in exposure calculations, the researchers added.

“There is no reason to panic, and yet it is important to understand that air quality in our sleeping micro-environment is important with regard to our exposure to various pollutants such as VOCs,” said senior researcher Yael Dubowski, an associate professor with the Israel Institute of Technology. “Hence, we should make an effort to improve it.”

Health effects associated with VOCs range from eye, nose and throat irritation to headaches and organ damage, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Some VOCs, including benzene, acetaldehyde and formaldehyde, have been associated with increased cancer risk.

For the study, Dubowski and her colleagues subjected eight different mattresses to simulated sleeping conditions, mimicking the elevated body heat, humidity and carbon dioxide caused by humans when they sleep for even a few hours.

The mattresses had been allowed to air out for at least six months prior to the study, noted Sarah Evans, an assistant professor of environmental medicine and public health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

“Often we think, well, if you let something air out for a little while, you can dramatically reduce the level of chemicals that are off-gassed,” said Evans, who wasn’t involved with the study. “In this case, even after six months they still saw appreciable levels of off-gassing.”

Body heat appeared to increase each mattress’ release of VOCs, compared with the levels released when the mattresses were not in use, researchers found.

Estimated exposures remained below the “No Significant Risk Levels” (NSRL) set under strict California environmental laws, researchers noted.

However, if the exposure levels took into account a child’s age, the picture took on more concern. For example, compounds linked to cancer such as acetaldehyde, formaldehyde and benzene approached or exceeded age-adjusted levels, researchers said.

The new study was published July 10 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Experts are generally more concerned about children’s exposure to VOCs, said Dr. Kenneth Spaeth, chief of occupational and environmental medicine at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y.

Babies in particular spend a lot of time in their crib, lying on foam mattresses that produce these gases, said Spaeth, who had no part in the study.

“By virtue of their age and size, they have heightened vulnerability to potential toxic effects,” he said.

Even if these chemicals don’t do immediate harm, there is concern that exposure will increase their lifelong risk of cancer, Evans and Spaeth said.

The best way to protect against VOCs is to maintain good ventilation inside your home, by opening windows and using fans, they said.

“Indoor air can have as much as 10 times higher VOCs than outdoor air,” Evans said. “Getting fresh air in can really help reduce those exposures.”

Consumers also can choose mattresses made of materials other than polyurethane foam, Evans said. Mattresses containing cotton, wool and natural latex will all produce lower levels of gases.

Unfortunately, it can be very difficult for consumers to suss out what’s in a mattress and what sort of VOCs those materials might produce, Spaeth said.

“Consumers are in a very difficult position,” Spaeth said. “It’s very hard to get good information about what a mattress contains, and even if you know that, unless you have a good understanding of the different materials it’s hard to know what chemicals might be emitted from those materials.

“The chemicals that are being emitted are not going to be listed in a label that indicates what the mattress is made of,” Spaeth said. “These are byproducts of the materials.”

More information

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has more about volatile organic compounds.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: July 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Pot a Substitute to Opioids or Sleep Meds for Many

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, July 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) — In places where it’s legal, people are often turning to pot to relieve pain and insomnia, a new study finds.

For many, cannabis is replacing over-the-counter painkillers, prescription opioids and sleep aids.

“These aren’t the only reasons people are using marijuana, but it’s one of the drivers for use,” said study author Dr. Gwen Wurm, an assistant professor of clinical pediatrics at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

“People who are using it for those reasons are finding it to be effective,” she said.

The findings stem from a survey of 1,000 people who use marijuana in Colorado, where it is legal. Of the 65% who said they use pot to quell pain, 80% said it was very or extremely helpful.

A similar percentage said they had been able to cut back on use of over-the-counter painkillers by using pot instead, and 88% said they stopped taking opioids, the study found.

Three-quarters of the interviewees said they used pot to help them sleep. Of those, 84% said it helped, and 83% said they were no longer using over-the-counter or prescription sleep aids.

Compared with other drugs, cannabis is safe, Wurm believes.

On the plus side, marijuana users are not at risk of the respiratory arrest opioids can cause, and pot won’t make you dependent as some sleep medicines do, she said.

“That doesn’t mean that it doesn’t have its own risks,” Wurm cautioned. “But until we can begin to study cannabis use, we are really not going to know how best to counsel patients.”

Other pain and sleep medications can have serious side effects, Wurm noted. Opioid addiction is an epidemic in the United States, and fatal overdoses are not uncommon. And over-the-counter pain relievers like ibuprofen can cause stomach bleeding if used for extended periods, Wurm said.

Also, people can become dependent on sleeping pills, which leave them groggy during the day and affect their work, she said.

However, marijuana is still a drug with its own addictive properties and risks, another expert warned.

Continued

Emily Feinstein, the Center on Addiction’s chief operating officer and executive vice president, previously told HealthDay, “Misinformation and misunderstanding about marijuana is rampant. Marijuana is addictive, and people who are dependent on the drug exhibit the same symptoms as those with other addictions, including cravings and withdrawal.”

For the study, Wurm’s team relied on a survey of people who bought pot at two retail stores in Colorado, where any adult with a valid ID can purchase it for medical or recreational use.

But if states like Colorado think legalizing weed will help curb the opioid epidemic, a study in the June 10 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences casts doubt on that assumption.

In that study, researchers found no association between medical marijuana laws and opioid overdose death rates.

In fact, the overdose death rate increased by about 23% between 1999 and 2017 in states that legalized medical pot, though only an association was seen, researchers emphasized.

Paul Armentano is deputy director of NORML, a group working to legalize marijuana nationwide. He called the findings in the new study “significant, though not altogether surprising.”

Other studies have found that use of medical marijuana is associated with the reduced use or even elimination of prescription opioids, he noted.

Another researcher thinks cannabis has a role to play in relieving pain and aiding sleep.

“Is use of cannabis for pain relief and improvement of sleep defensible?” said Dr. David Katz, director of the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center in New Haven, Conn. “The answer is yes, whenever cannabis can contribute a therapeutic effect with less risk than the established alternatives.”

Treatments need not be completely risk-free, and few, if any are, Katz said, adding their use is justified when benefits outweigh risks.

Using cannabis to treat pain and insomnia seems worthwhile when you consider the risks of opioids and sleep medications, he said. But a survey alone doesn’t prove its effectiveness, he added.

“We need trials directly comparing the efficacy and safety of therapeutic alternatives,” Katz said. “The best treatments are those that win these contests of comparative efficacy.”

The report was published July 2 in the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Gwen Wurm, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of clinical pediatrics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Coral Gables, Fla.; Paul Armentano, deputy director, NORML; David Katz, M.D., M.P.H., director, Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, New Haven, Conn.;Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, July 2, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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For Many, Pot Is Now an Alternative to Opioids or Sleep Meds

TUESDAY, July 2, 2019 — In places where it’s legal, people are often turning to pot to relieve pain and insomnia, a new study finds.

For many, cannabis is replacing over-the-counter painkillers, prescription opioids and sleep aids.

“These aren’t the only reasons people are using marijuana, but it’s one of the drivers for use,” said study author Dr. Gwen Wurm, an assistant professor of clinical pediatrics at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

“People who are using it for those reasons are finding it to be effective,” she said.

The findings stem from a survey of 1,000 people who use marijuana in Colorado, where it is legal. Of the 65% who said they use pot to quell pain, 80% said it was very or extremely helpful.

A similar percentage said they had been able to cut back on use of over-the-counter painkillers by using pot instead, and 88% said they stopped taking opioids, the study found.

Three-quarters of the interviewees said they used pot to help them sleep. Of those, 84% said it helped, and 83% said they were no longer using over-the-counter or prescription sleep aids.

Compared with other drugs, cannabis is safe, Wurm believes.

On the plus side, marijuana users are not at risk of the respiratory arrest opioids can cause, and pot won’t make you dependent as some sleep medicines do, she said.

“That doesn’t mean that it doesn’t have its own risks,” Wurm cautioned. “But until we can begin to study cannabis use, we are really not going to know how best to counsel patients.”

Other pain and sleep medications can have serious side effects, Wurm noted. Opioid addiction is an epidemic in the United States, and fatal overdoses are not uncommon. And over-the-counter pain relievers like ibuprofen can cause stomach bleeding if used for extended periods, Wurm said.

Also, people can become dependent on sleeping pills, which leave them groggy during the day and affect their work, she said.

However, marijuana is still a drug with its own addictive properties and risks, another expert warned.

Emily Feinstein, the Center on Addiction’s chief operating officer and executive vice president, previously told HealthDay, “Misinformation and misunderstanding about marijuana is rampant. Marijuana is addictive, and people who are dependent on the drug exhibit the same symptoms as those with other addictions, including cravings and withdrawal.”

For the study, Wurm’s team relied on a survey of people who bought pot at two retail stores in Colorado, where any adult with a valid ID can purchase it for medical or recreational use.

But if states like Colorado think legalizing weed will help curb the opioid epidemic, a study in the June 10 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences casts doubt on that assumption.

In that study, researchers found no association between medical marijuana laws and opioid overdose death rates.

In fact, the overdose death rate increased by about 23% between 1999 and 2017 in states that legalized medical pot, though only an association was seen, researchers emphasized.

Paul Armentano is deputy director of NORML, a group working to legalize marijuana nationwide. He called the findings in the new study “significant, though not altogether surprising.”

Other studies have found that use of medical marijuana is associated with the reduced use or even elimination of prescription opioids, he noted.

Another researcher thinks cannabis has a role to play in relieving pain and aiding sleep.

“Is use of cannabis for pain relief and improvement of sleep defensible?” said Dr. David Katz, director of the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center in New Haven, Conn. “The answer is yes, whenever cannabis can contribute a therapeutic effect with less risk than the established alternatives.”

Treatments need not be completely risk-free, and few, if any are, Katz said, adding their use is justified when benefits outweigh risks.

Using cannabis to treat pain and insomnia seems worthwhile when you consider the risks of opioids and sleep medications, he said. But a survey alone doesn’t prove its effectiveness, he added.

“We need trials directly comparing the efficacy and safety of therapeutic alternatives,” Katz said. “The best treatments are those that win these contests of comparative efficacy.”

The report was published July 2 in the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse offers more about marijuana.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: July 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Hispanic Teens Losing Sleep Over Trump’s Immigration Policies

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 — Hispanic teens are being driven to anxiety and sleeplessness over the Trump Administration’s immigration policies, even though they are U.S.-born citizens and face no threat of deportation, a new study shows.

Nearly half of a group of 16-year-old Hispanic children in the Salinas Valley region of California reported that they worry that U.S. immigration policy could tear their families apart, researchers found.

Those teens had five times higher levels of anxiety as kids without similar worries, the study shows. They also had poorer sleep quality.

“These are U.S. citizens and these are 16-year-olds, and kids who have this kind of high level of anxiety, it’s not fleeting,” said lead researcher Brenda Eskenazi, director of the Center for Environmental Research and Children’s Health at the University of California, Berkeley.

“It’s likely to affect their ability to focus in school, stay in school, criminality, their health,” Eskenazi continued. “If you’re living with this level of anxiety, there are likely to be long-term consequences. It’s likely to affect other aspects of their life and well-being.”

Worse, this particular group of teenagers likely reflect only a hint of the ongoing fear that’s simmering in other parts of the nation, Eskenazi added.

The city of Salinas is promoted as a welcoming city nestled within the sanctuary state of California, researchers noted. Three out of four people in the Salinas Valley are Hispanic, and the percentage of undocumented immigrants likely exceeds 29%.

“These kids are living in a pretty exclusive environment. We’re not seeing a whole lot of ICE raids in this area. And yet, as U.S. citizens, they are experiencing effects,” Eskenazi said. “We may see more of this in kids around the United States who aren’t living in such a protective environment.”

There are an estimated 18 million children in the United States with at least one immigrant parent — 1 in every 4 kids, the researchers noted. Nearly 1 in 10 has at least one parent who’s an undocumented immigrant.

Just last week, U.S. President Donald Trump promised raids targeting about 2,000 in 10 major cities across the country.

Trump then announced Saturday that he was delaying the raids for two weeks, to put pressure on Democratic lawmakers to accept changes that would tighten the nation’s asylum laws.

Eskenazi and her colleagues are engaged in a long-term study of about 400 children born to Hispanic farmworker families in the Salinas Valley. The kids are U.S. citizens born to at least one parent from Mexico or Central America.

“We have been following them since they were in utero, at least half of these kids,” Eskenazi said.

By chance, these kids underwent a health assessment at age 14, just before the 2016 presidential election, and another at age 16 in the first year after the election.

The researchers realized this would give them a unique chance to see how anti-immigration policies are affecting the children of immigrants.

About 45% of the kids in the study said they worry at least sometimes about how U.S. immigration policy would affect them personally, or whether their families would be separated due to deportation.

Two in five said they worried about being reported to the immigration office, even though they are citizens.

The teens with immigration worries had much higher anxiety levels, and those levels nearly tripled between their pre- and post-election checkups, researchers calculated.

This anxiety appears to be affecting their sleep. One in five said it takes them a long time to get to sleep, 16% said they have fairly or very bad sleep quality, and 11% said they had trouble staying awake during the day.

Stress and sleeplessness can affect teens’ performance in school and increase their risks of future health problems like obesity and high blood pressure, said Dr. Elizabeth Dawson-Hahn, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington in Seattle. She co-authored an editorial accompanying the study, published online June 24 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

Kids dealing with anxiety also are at increased risk for substance abuse, and have poorer future job prospects, the researchers noted.

“It’s not setting them up for success or a healthy life ahead to add this additional stressor to their lives,” Dawson-Hahn said. “It’s important to recognize that policies do have public health impacts.”

These teens will likely need more help in the future. “At the very least we need to track these kids and we need to provide legal and mental health services,” Eskenazi said.

Health care professionals also can help by encouraging advanced care planning amongst these families, Dawson-Hahn said.

Families should make plans to determine with whom a teen would stay if one or both parents are arrested by immigration agents, and whether the teen would leave the country if their parents are deported or stay in the United States with a trusted adult, Dawson-Hahn said.

“This is a legitimate concern. The concern youth have about their parents potentially being deported, it is real,” Dawson-Hahn said. “We need to help families think through planning if they were to be deported, while acknowledging that we hope that is not the outcome for the family.”

More information

The American Psychological Association has more about teens and stress.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: June 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Study: Less Sleep For Teens = More Unsafe Sex

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Parents, here’s another reason your teenager should get enough sleep: A new study suggests tired teens may be more likely to have unsafe sex.

Researchers analyzed data collected from 1,850 teens in Southern California between 2013 and 2017. The participants were 16 in 2013.

Teens who consistently did not get enough sleep at any time during the week were nearly twice as likely to engage in unsafe sex — such as not using condoms or having sex under the influence of alcohol or drugs — than those who slept an average of 3.5 extra hours on weekends.

The study was published June 3 in the journal Health Psychology.

“Teens who were short weekday [average of 6.35 hours a night] and short weekend sleepers [average of 7.8 hours a night] were not getting adequate sleep during the school week and were not catching up on sleep on the weekends, and thus were chronically sleep-deprived,” said study author Wendy Troxel in a journal news release. She’s a senior behavioral and social scientist at RAND Corp., a nonprofit research institution.

“Insufficient sleep may increase the potential for sexual risk-taking by compromising decision-making and influencing impulsivity,” Troxel added.

Sleep quality had no effect on risky sexual behavior, according to the study.

The study findings add to growing evidence about a link between teens’ sleep and risky behaviors, according to the researchers, though it only found an association.

“Sexual risk-taking in adolescence poses serious health concerns, such as an increased potential of getting sexually transmitted infections, including HIV,” Troxel said.

“Teens by and large are not getting the recommended eight to 10 hours of sleep a night, due to a number of reasons, including biological changes in circadian rhythms, early school start times, balancing school and extracurricular activities and peer social pressures,” Troxel noted.

She said teen sleep is a difficult challenge for parents, clinicians and policymakers.

“On one hand, we should encourage sleep routines for teens because regularity is important for maintaining healthy sleep and circadian rhythms,” Troxel said.

“However, for most U.S. teens, whose weekday sleep opportunities are constrained due to early school start times, maintaining consistency in sleep-wake schedules throughout the week may not only be unrealistic, but also may be unhealthy if it perpetuates a pattern of chronic sleep deprivation,” she added.

“Our recommendation is for parents and teens to find a middle ground, which allows for some weekend catch-up sleep, while maintaining some level of consistency in sleep-wake patterns,” Troxel said.

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Sources

SOURCE:Health Psychology, news release, June 3, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

LED Blue Light Poses Eye, Sleep Risks: Report

May 17, 2019 — The blue light in LED lighting used in many consumer products may harm your sleep and pose a risk to your eyes, a new report warns.

Specifically, there is new evidence that this type of light can disturb biological and sleep rhythms and damage the eye‘s retina, according to the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety.

Products with LEDs that produce blue light include the newest flashlights, car headlights and some toys, CNN reported.

The maximum limit on short-term exposure to blue light should be reduced, only low-risk LED devices should be available to consumers, and the luminosity of car headlights should be reduced, the French agency recommended.

It also said that eye protection provided by “anti-blue light” screens, filters and sunglasses varies, and there is no proof that those help preserve sleep rhythms, CNN reported.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

Babies Still Dying Due to Unsafe Sleep Practices

By Serena Gordon

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The death of a baby is always tragic, but safe sleep practices could have prevented some recent suffocation deaths, new research claims.

The study found two factors appeared to be behind a majority of infant deaths by suffocation:

  • A baby not sleeping on his or her back.
  • A baby sleeping in an adult bed.

“Although this is a small proportion of sudden unexpected infant deaths, many suffocation deaths can be prevented,” said study author Alexa Erck Lambert. She is an epidemiologist at DB Consulting Group in Silver Spring, Md.

While the rates of accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed are low, they’re on the rise.

In 1999, six such deaths were recorded. In 2015, that number rose to 23 babies, according to background information in the study.

The authors noted that the rise in these deaths may be due to more precise definitions of causes-of-death. They added that current statistics may underestimate the problem.

For the new study, the researchers reviewed more than 1,800 infant deaths in a database of sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUID) from 2011 to 2014. In all, 250 babies — 14% — died from suffocation.

The cause of 69% of these deaths was soft bedding. And almost all — 92% — of the babies who died from suffocation on soft bedding weren’t sleeping on their backs. They were found on their side or on their stomach. Nearly half were in adult beds when they died, according to the report.

Pillows, blankets and couch cushions were cited as types of soft bedding that contributed to these deaths, the researchers noted.

Nineteen percent of the suffocation deaths were due to “overlay.” That means someone was on top of the infant when the baby died. Most of the time it was a parent, but in 22% of overlay deaths, a sibling was on top of the baby.

The remaining 12% of infant suffocation deaths were attributed to “wedging.” This is when a baby gets wedged between a mattress and another surface. Half the time, the other surface was a wall. In roughly one-quarter of cases, it was the bedframe. Three-quarters of these deaths occurred in an adult bed. Nearly half occurred when a baby was sleeping with another person.

Continued

Dr. Maryann Buetti-Sgouros, chair of pediatrics at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y., wasn’t surprised by the findings, but she did express frustration.

“These are all deaths that were preventable; these were unnecessary deaths,” she said.

Some parents tell her they feel better if their baby is close so they can respond if he or she needs something. “Or, some parents feel their baby is advanced enough to be able to sleep on their stomach, because they saw the baby roll over once,” she added.

But the study found almost 90% of babies between 0 and 4 months of age, and nearly 70% of infants from 5 to 11 months who died of suffocation were found on their stomachs.

“It’s just not worth the risk,” Buetti-Sgouros said.

She urged parents to follow the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) guidelines, which recommend babies be placed on their backs to sleep. AAP recommends that infants sleep in the same room with parents for the first 12 months of life — but not in the same bed. Buetti-Sgouros said it’s fine to have the baby’s crib in your room, so that the baby is still close.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (which provided funding for the study) also recommends that parents:

  • Put baby to sleep on a firm sleep surface.
  • Keep pillows, bumpers, blankets and soft toys out of the baby’s sleeping area.

Erck Lambert said it isn’t clear from this study why some parents continue to put babies to sleep on their stomachs, or let them sleep on soft surfaces. But she hopes the findings will help “better target prevention efforts.”

The findings were published online April 22 in Pediatrics.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Alexa Erck Lambert, M.P.H., program manager and epidemiologist, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, SUID and SDY case registry, DB Consulting Group, Silver Spring, Md.; Maryann Buetti-Sgouros, M.D., chair of pediatrics, Northern Westchester Hospital, Mount Kisco, N.Y.;  April 22, 2019,Pediatrics, online

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

Babies Still Dying Due to Unsafe Sleep Practices

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 — The death of a baby is always tragic, but safe sleep practices could have prevented some recent suffocation deaths, new research claims.

The study found two factors appeared to be behind a majority of infant deaths by suffocation:

  • A baby not sleeping on his or her back.
  • A baby sleeping in an adult bed.

“Although this is a small proportion of sudden unexpected infant deaths, many suffocation deaths can be prevented,” said study author Alexa Erck Lambert. She is an epidemiologist at DB Consulting Group in Silver Spring, Md.

While the rates of accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed are low, they’re on the rise.

In 1999, six such deaths were recorded. In 2015, that number rose to 23 babies, according to background information in the study.

The authors noted that the rise in these deaths may be due to more precise definitions of causes-of-death. They added that current statistics may underestimate the problem.

For the new study, the researchers reviewed more than 1,800 infant deaths in a database of sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUID) from 2011 to 2014. In all, 250 babies — 14% — died from suffocation.

The cause of 69% of these deaths was soft bedding. And almost all — 92% — of the babies who died from suffocation on soft bedding weren’t sleeping on their backs. They were found on their side or on their stomach. Nearly half were in adult beds when they died, according to the report.

Pillows, blankets and couch cushions were cited as types of soft bedding that contributed to these deaths, the researchers noted.

Nineteen percent of the suffocation deaths were due to “overlay.” That means someone was on top of the infant when the baby died. Most of the time it was a parent, but in 22% of overlay deaths, a sibling was on top of the baby.

The remaining 12% of infant suffocation deaths were attributed to “wedging.” This is when a baby gets wedged between a mattress and another surface. Half the time, the other surface was a wall. In roughly one-quarter of cases, it was the bedframe. Three-quarters of these deaths occurred in an adult bed. Nearly half occurred when a baby was sleeping with another person.

Dr. Maryann Buetti-Sgouros, chair of pediatrics at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y., wasn’t surprised by the findings, but she did express frustration.

“These are all deaths that were preventable; these were unnecessary deaths,” she said.

Some parents tell her they feel better if their baby is close so they can respond if he or she needs something. “Or, some parents feel their baby is advanced enough to be able to sleep on their stomach, because they saw the baby roll over once,” she added.

But the study found almost 90% of babies between 0 and 4 months of age, and nearly 70% of infants from 5 to 11 months who died of suffocation were found on their stomachs.

“It’s just not worth the risk,” Buetti-Sgouros said.

She urged parents to follow the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) guidelines, which recommend babies be placed on their backs to sleep. AAP recommends that infants sleep in the same room with parents for the first 12 months of life — but not in the same bed. Buetti-Sgouros said it’s fine to have the baby’s crib in your room, so that the baby is still close.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (which provided funding for the study) also recommends that parents:

  • Put baby to sleep on a firm sleep surface.
  • Keep pillows, bumpers, blankets and soft toys out of the baby’s sleeping area.

Erck Lambert said it isn’t clear from this study why some parents continue to put babies to sleep on their stomachs, or let them sleep on soft surfaces. But she hopes the findings will help “better target prevention efforts.”

The findings were published online April 22 in Pediatrics.

More information

Learn more about preventing sudden infant deaths and suffocation from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: April 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Sleeping In on Weekends May Not Repay Sleep ‘Debt’

By Amy Norton

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Feb. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) — People who are sleep-deprived during the week often try to make up for it on weekends. But a new study suggests the tactic may backfire.

Researchers found that weekday sleep loss had negative effects on people’s metabolism — and “catch-up” sleep on the weekend did not reverse it.

In fact, there were signs that the extra weekend shut-eye could make matters worse, said senior study author Kenneth Wright, a professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

The bottom line, according to Wright, is that people need to consistently get sufficient sleep.

“If you want to lead a healthy lifestyle,” he said, “that has to include good sleep habits.”

The study, published online Feb. 28 in the journal Current Biology, included 36 healthy young adults. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups that all spent nine nights in the sleep lab.

One group was allowed to sleep for up to 9 hours each night. A second could sleep only 5 hours. The third group was allowed 5 hours of sleep for five days, then a weekend “recovery” period where they could sleep in as late as they wanted; after that, they returned to 5 hours of sleep for two nights.

Wright’s team found that in both sleep-deprived groups, people lost some of their sensitivity to insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar. They also began to eat more at night and gained some weight, on average.

The group that was allowed to sleep in on the weekend saw one benefit: There was less late-night eating on those days.

However, they went right back to post-dinner munching once they returned to 5-hour nights. And their insulin sensitivity remained impaired.

In addition, Wright said, they showed decreased insulin sensitivity in the liver and muscles, specifically — which was not seen in the group that got no catch-up sleep over the weekend.

Over time, decreased insulin sensitivity can be a precursor to type 2 diabetes. And a number of studies have linked chronic sleep loss to heightened risks of diabetes and obesity, Wright noted.

Continued

In general, experts recommend that adults get 7 or more hours of sleep each night for the sake of their overall health. Yet, studies show that more than one-third of U.S. adults fall short of that goal.

Dr. Phyllis Zee, a sleep specialist and professor at Northwestern University School of Medicine, in Chicago, said, “We tend to buy into the myth that by ‘catching up’ on sleep on weekends, we’ll [reverse] the adverse effects of repeated sleep loss.”

But, according to Zee, who was not involved in the new research, “the results of this study support that it is indeed a myth. In fact, even the muscle and liver ‘remember’ the adverse and persistent effects of sleep loss.”

It’s true, Wright said, that real life can get in the way of optimal sleep. But he added that people should take an honest look at their habits and see if they can make time for a good night’s sleep.

“What are the ‘sleep stealers’ in your life?” Wright said. “Are you up late watching TV or on your computer?”

Late-night “screen” use is a problem not only because it takes time away from sleep, he pointed out: Staring at a blue light before bedtime can actually disrupt your ability to fall asleep.

Sleep is vital for a range of body processes, not only metabolism. And Zee said there’s evidence that other effects of chronic sleep loss — including dampened alertness and mental performance — cannot be erased with a couple of nights of catch-up sleep.

“Regularity in both timing and duration of sleep is key to brain and body health” she said.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Kenneth Wright, Ph.D., professor, integrative physiology, University of Colorado, Boulder; Phyllis Zee, M.D., professor, neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago; Feb. 28, 2019,Current Biology, online

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

‘); } else { // If we match both our test Topic Ids and Buisness Ref we want to place the ad in the middle of page 1 if($ .inArray(window.s_topic, moveAdTopicIds) > -1 && $ .inArray(window.s_business_reference, moveAdBuisRef) > -1){ // The logic below reads count all nodes in page 1. Exclude the footer,ol,ul and table elements. Use the varible // moveAdAfter to know which node to place the Ad container after. window.placeAd = function(pn) { var nodeTags = [‘p’, ‘h3′,’aside’, ‘ul’], nodes, target; nodes = $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(‘ + pn + ‘)’).find(nodeTags.join()).not(‘p:empty’).not(‘footer *’).not(‘ol *, ul *, table *’); //target = nodes.eq(Math.floor(nodes.length / 2)); target = nodes.eq(moveAdAfter); $ (”).insertAfter(target); } // Currently passing in 1 to move the Ad in to page 1 window.placeAd(1); } else { // This is the default location on the bottom of page 1 $ (‘.article-page:nth-child(1)’).append(”); } } })(); $ (function(){ // Create a new conatiner where we will make our lazy load Ad call if the reach the footer section of the article $ (‘.main-container-3’).prepend(”); });

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WebMD Health

Few Teens Meet Sleep, Screen, Exercise Guidelines

Alba Cabré-Riera, Barcelona Institute for Global Health, Barcelona, Spain.

Jenny Christie, Indian Hills, CO.

Kati Duncan, clinical psychologist, Chesapeake, VA.

Jenny Erard, Bend, OR.

Kathy Ferony, Bowie, MD.

Kim Guest, Raleigh, NC.

Liz Gurgel, Canton, MI.

Pat Jesten, Springfield, VA.

Gregory Knell, PhD, University of Texas Health Science Center, Dallas.

Marci Jerome, Fairfax, VA.

Frances Phan, Springfield, VA.

Audrey Jung, psychotherapist, Phoenix, AZ.

Terri Tolliver, Washington, D.C.

American Academy of Pediatrics: “American Academy of Pediatrics Announces New Recommendations for Children’s Media Use.” 

JAMA Pediatrics: “Prevalence and Likelihood of Meeting Sleep, Physical Activity, and Screen-Time Guidelines Among US Youth.”

Preventive Medicine Reports: “The influence of depression status on weekly exercise in children ages 6 to 17?years.”

Exercise and Sports Sciences Reviews: “Raising an Active and Healthy Generation: A Comprehensive Public Health Initiative.”

Environmental Research: “Telecommunication devices use, screen time and sleep in adolescents.”

Sleep Health: “Young adolescent sleep is associated with parental monitoring.”

SSM Population Health Journal: “Family contexts and sleep during adolescence.”

Journal of Sleep Research: “The impact of sleep on complex gross-motor adaptation in adolescents.”

Revista Medica de Chile: “[Quality of sleep and academic performance in high school students].”

WebMD Health

Poor Sleep Plagues Many Kids With Autism