Second Thoughts About That Tattoo? Here’s Some Advice

FRIDAY, Sept. 20, 2019 — If it’s time for that tattoo to go, here’s some advice from the American Academy of Dermatology.

Lasers removal of tattoos has become safer and more effective, but the results depend almost entirely on the person doing the work.

“For the best results and to reduce your risk of serious side effects, such as scarring, burns and other wounds, it’s important to make sure the person treating you is a physician who is extremely skilled in using lasers and has in-depth knowledge of the skin,” said New York City dermatologist Dr. Marie Leger.

“After that, it’s also important to properly care for the treated skin between sessions, as your skin needs time to heal and flush out the ink,” Leger added in an academy news release.

After each treatment, wash the treated area twice a day with water and a gentle cleanser. Use a clean cotton swab to apply petroleum jelly to the area to help keep the skin moist so it doesn’t dry out or form scabs. To prevent infection, cover the treated area with a dressing until the skin heals.

The treated skin is more susceptible to sun damage, so you should protect it from direct sun exposure. When outdoors, wear protective clothing, such as a lightweight, long-sleeved shirt, pants and a wide-brimmed hat, Leger advised.

After the treated skin heals, use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher that contains zinc oxide. Zinc deflects the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays.

Don’t pick at any flaking, peeling, blisters or scabs that form, and don’t pop any blisters. Doing so can cause infection.

After a laser tattoo removal session, it’s normal to see some redness, swelling and blistering as your skin heals. However, if you notice signs of an infection, such as increasing redness and pain, swelling or pus, see a doctor.

“Tattoo removal requires many treatments, with weeks between sessions,” Leger said. “For the best results, follow your dermatologist’s instructions for at-home care, and keep all of your appointments for laser tattoo removal, as each treatment removes more ink.”

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more on tattoo removal

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: September 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Suicidal Thoughts Common for Transgender Youth

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Transgender youth are more likely to have suicidal thoughts, a new study finds.

Researchers examined survey data from more than 900,000 high school students in California. They found that 35 percent of transgender youth said they’d had suicidal thoughts in the past year, compared with 19 percent of non-transgender youth.

The study appears in the September issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

“It is crucial that studies of adolescent health include measures of gender identity alongside sexual orientation to better understand and create programs to address the needs of these youth across the United States,” study lead author Amaya Perez-Brumer, from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, said in a journal news release.

Increased rates of depression and victimization among transgender youth partly explain their higher risk of suicidal thoughts, the researchers said.

“Like all students, transgender youth deserve to be safe and supported at school. These results show that reducing depression and victimization for transgender students should significantly reduce their suicide-related risk,” study co-author Stephen Russell said in the news release.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, news release, Sept. 5, 2017

Copyright © 2013-2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

WebMD Health

Suicidal Thoughts More Common for Transgender Youth

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 — Transgender youth are more likely to have suicidal thoughts, a new study finds.

Researchers examined survey data from more than 900,000 high school students in California. They found that 35 percent of transgender youth said they’d had suicidal thoughts in the past year, compared with 19 percent of non-transgender youth.

The study appears in the September issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

“It is crucial that studies of adolescent health include measures of gender identity alongside sexual orientation to better understand and create programs to address the needs of these youth across the United States,” study lead author Amaya Perez-Brumer, from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, said in a journal news release.

Increased rates of depression and victimization among transgender youth partly explain their higher risk of suicidal thoughts, the researchers said.

“Like all students, transgender youth deserve to be safe and supported at school. These results show that reducing depression and victimization for transgender students should significantly reduce their suicide-related risk,” study co-author Stephen Russell said in the news release.

More information

The National Center for Transgender Equality has more on transgender youth and students.

Posted: September 2017

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Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Teen Suicide Thoughts Double in a Decade

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) — A controversial new Netflix series, “13 Reasons Why,” has renewed public focus on the tragedy of teen suicide — and a new study suggests its release is timely.

The report finds that the number of American kids admitted to children’s hospitals for suicidal thoughts or self-harm more than doubled during the last decade.

Diagnoses of suicidal thoughts or attempted self-harm increased from 0.67 percent of all kids treated in 2008 to 1.79 percent in 2015, according to data from 32 children’s hospitals across the United States.

Suicidal thoughts or attempts among kids appear to fluctuate with the school calendar, reaching their lowest levels during the summer and spiking in the fall and spring, said lead researcher Dr. Gregory Plemmons. He is an associate professor of pediatrics at Vanderbilt University, in Nashville, Tenn.

“Clearly, school can be a driver” for teen suicide, Plemmons said, although he added that the reasons behind this association are unclear.

“You can’t point your finger at any one thing,” Plemmons said. “For some kids, academic performance and stress is being reported as a trigger. For other kids, it may be cyberbullying through social media and other things that aren’t as common in the summer as during the school year.”

Psychologists and educators have been concerned that “13 Reasons Why,” adapted from a best-selling young adult novel, is glamorizing suicide. As a result, Netflix announced Monday that it is adding viewer warnings to the show’s opening, to deter copycat behavior.

The series centers on the suicide of a teenage girl who leaves behind 13 cassette tapes, each addressed to a person who she claims played a role in the decision to end her own life.

Teen suicide “has been in the media” with the new series, which “a lot of teenagers have been watching,” Plemmons said.

“You want to increase awareness,” he said. “We don’t want to minimize the very real issues that teenagers are struggling with, with depression and suicide. We certainly don’t want to glamorize suicide, but the more we can reduce the stigma associated with mental illness and depression, hopefully the better prevention will be.”

Continued

In the study, Plemmons and his colleagues found over 118,000 hospital encounters between 2008 and 2015 where a child was diagnosed with suicidal thoughts or self-harm. The findings were scheduled for presentation May 7 at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting, in San Francisco. Research presented at meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Slightly more than half of the patients with suicidal thoughts or actions were between the ages of 15 and 17, while another third were aged 12 to 14. An additional 13 percent of patients were between the ages of 5 and 11, the findings showed.

Significant increases were found in all age groups, but tended to be higher among older children. Teens aged 15 to 17 had the largest increase, followed by 12- to 14-year-olds.

Dr. Victor Schwartz, chief medical officer of the JED Foundation in New York City, believes academic pressure plays a large role in childhood stress, particularly in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis. The JED Foundation is a national suicide prevention nonprofit.

“Kids have a tremendous uncertainty about what their job and economic futures are. If you don’t excel and don’t get in that group of winners, you’re not going to be in a good place,” Schwartz said. “For a lot of these kids, it always feels like it’s a very high-stakes game. There’s no room for making mistakes or having things go wrong or getting a B or C in a class.”

The largest increase seemed to be among teenage girls, an observation consistent with other studies, Plemmons said.

“We certainly know puberty is a driver for suicide,” Plemmons said. “The average age at which females reach puberty has shifted over the last several decades. Girls are now going into puberty earlier, so that’s one consideration.”

However, these numbers also might have increased because health care professionals are becoming more adept at detecting kids at risk, Plemmons added.

“We are hopefully screening more for it, and if you screen more you’re going to pick up more kids with these thoughts,” he said.

Continued

A second study presented at the meeting illustrated the challenges in detecting teenagers who might be at risk for suicide.

Researchers found that few teenagers will actually reach for the word “depressed” to describe negative emotions that are weighing them down.

Parents, educators and doctors instead must rely on other clues that indicate depression, said study co-author Daniela DeFrino, an assistant professor of research in the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine and College of Nursing.

Teens suffering from depression are more likely to say they are “stressed” or “anxious” or “down,” DeFrino said.

“We found that it might be easy to miss some of the ways teens are talking about how they are feeling,” DeFrino said.

Other common clues of teen depression included:

  • Increased anger and irritability.
  • A loss of interest in activities once enjoyed.
  • Altered sleep patterns, including insomnia or oversleeping.

Two-thirds of the teens also had visited their doctor for physical illnesses, such as ulcers, migraines, stomach pains and fatigue.

Researchers drew these clues from interviews conducted with 369 teens aged 13 to 19 at risk for depression who participated in a federally funded clinical trial.

The teens often noted school pressures, family turmoil and the deaths of those close to them as sources of stress or difficulty.

Schwartz said it makes sense that kids might not use the same words as adults to express sadness or depression.

“It’s not self-evident that young kids and teens always have the language to talk about their emotional experiences,” Schwartz said.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Gregory Plemmons, M.D., associate professor, pediatrics, Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.; Victor Schwartz, M.D., chief medical officer, JED Foundation, New York City; Daniela DeFrino, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor, research, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine and College of Nursing

Copyright © 2013-2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

WebMD Health

President’s Day: Trump’s Public Thoughts on Pot

Our General Election cultivated several new adult-use states last November, creating another historic moment for the marijuana legalization movement. Despite that important progression, our 45th president of the United States has remained ambiguous on the topic, flip-flopping more than a few times during the course of his campaign. As we prepare to honor those individuals […]
Marijuana

Penny for her thoughts: Puppy heads home after 2,400-mile U.S. road trip

(Reuters) – A puppy called Penny could be reunited with her worry-stricken U.S. owners by week’s end after she went on a nearly 2,400-mile road trip that took her to an Iowa truck stop and a Pennsylvania pet hospital, her family said on Tuesday.

The floppy-eared Vizsla has one more stop before returning home to Washington state. She has to travel from Pennsylvania, where she has been in foster care, to the District of Columbia for a free ride home from U.S. carrier Alaska Airlines, her owners said in a message on Saturday on a Facebook page devoted to finding her.

“When she went missing, we thought she ran off and we were never going to see her again. We’re just happy knowing she’s alive,” Kendra Brown, Penny’s owner, told Pittsburgh broadcaster WPXI. “I’m sure if she could talk, she’d have quite a few adventures to talk about.”

Penny’s cross-country voyage began on Dec. 19 when she got loose from her owners and a truck driver picked her up while she was wandering in her hometown of Royal City, a tiny community in eastern Washington, her owners said.

“We were able to track him down and when he found out we knew he had her, he dropped her off at a truck stop in Des Moines, Iowa,” her family said.

Already some 1,600 miles from home, Penny somehow ended up days later in the care of a veterinarian at a pet hospital in West Township, Pennsylvania, a message on Dec. 24 said. Banfield Pet Hospital confirmed Penny’s Washington state roots by scanning the dog’s micro chip, a spokeswoman said.

The dog has been staying in foster care and the family hopes to have her back in Washington by the end of the week, they said on Facebook.

Alaska Airlines said it learned about the dog on Dec. 26 and is “flying Penny home complimentary” from a District of Columbia area airport to Seattle on Jan. 2, a spokeswoman said.

Penny’s owners did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

(Reporting by Eric M. Johnson in Seattle; Editing by Nick Macfie)


Reuters: Oddly Enough

Is Colorado Having Second Thoughts About Legalization?

Colorado’s experiment with the recreational legalization of marijuana has generally been deemed a success. Tax money is rolling in. Cannabis isn’t taking over the public schools. And, so far, it doesn’t appear that stoned driving is any more of a problem than it was before the first recreational sales began in January.

However, a new poll by Suffolk University finds that some citizens in the Centennial State are having second thoughts about their 2012 decision to fully legalize it.

An ever so slight majority, 50.2 percent, of the 500 “likely” voters questioned said “they do not agree with the decision to legalize recreational marijuana,” according to a new statement from the school.

Suffolk found that 46 percent back legalization.

More people “do not approve” of how Colorado officials are implementing legalization that than those who do, at a rate of 49 percent to 42 percent, the poll found.

David Paleologos, director of the Suffolk University Political Research Center in Boston, said:

Although it’s a close split overall, opposition comes mainly from women statewide who oppose it fifty-six percent to forty-one percent and additional pushback from voters over fifty-five years of age. This is offset by younger voters between eighteen and forty-five who still support it by a twenty-point margin.

Keep in mind, though, that a sample size of 500 is sometimes frowned upon in statistical circles. Most respected surveys go with sample sizes of 1,000 or more randomly chosen people. On top of that, Suffolk says it questioned likely voters, not registered voters, which could also skew the results.

The school says the survey has an error rate of +/-4.4 percent which, in the case of the marijuana questions, could reverse the results or at least render them almost meaningless.

The 420 Times

Most People Have Unwanted Thoughts, International Study Finds


Most People Have Unwanted Thoughts, International Study Finds

Difference for people with OCD is how they react, experts say

WebMD News from HealthDay

Resulting stress, anxiety, bad habits may lead to

By Randy Dotinga

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Do you ever feel a bit tortured by the idea that you left the iron on or caught a dread disease in that dirty restroom? Ever have a random thought about hurting someone even though you’re not a violent person?

You’re far from alone.

A new study reports that many college students around the world routinely have these kinds of “intrusive” worries — even if they don’t have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

The findings suggest it’s not the thoughts that are the problem for people with OCD but the way they react to them, said study lead author Adam Radomsky, director of the Center for Clinical Research in Health at Concordia University, in Montreal.

“Almost everyone has these kinds of thoughts. They’re normal, and they’re a part of being human,” Radomsky said. For people who suffer from OCD, this knowledge “can be incredibly helpful to change the meaning that they ascribe to the intrusive thoughts,” he said.

About 1 percent of adults in the United States have suffered from OCD within the past 12 months, and about half of those — one in 200 — are classified as severe, according to the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).

On average, people develop OCD at age 19, according to the NIMH. People with the condition can develop two types of symptoms, sometimes together. They can suffer from obsessive thoughts, like a broken record in their head, based on fears like contamination from germs. Or they may develop compulsions, such as endlessly checking a faucet to make sure it’s off.

Researchers in the Western world, particularly in English-speaking countries, have shown that so-called intrusive thoughts are common and not just found in people with OCD. “We were interested in knowing whether this applies in other cultures,” Radomsky said. “Is it fair to say that humans experience these intrusions?” Or just those with OCD?

The study authors gave surveys to 777 college students in 13 countries across six continents: Argentina, Australia, Canada, China, Iran, Israel, Italy, France, Greece, Sierra Leone, Spain, Turkey and the United States.

Almost 94 percent of the students said they’d had unwanted and intrusive thoughts during the past three months. “For most people, it was more than once,” Radomsky said.

The surveys defined intrusive thoughts as having to do with subjects like contamination (worrying about germs, for instance), aggression (such as thinking about hurting someone else), and doubt.

An expert who praised the new study said people with OCD carry these thoughts further.

“The difference between individuals with OCD having a violent thought — for example, thinking of pushing someone in front of a car — is that they worry about the fact that they have the thought: ‘What does this mean? Why am I thinking this? Does this mean I might actually do it?'” said Jeff Szymanski, executive director of the International OCD Foundation.

WebMD Health

Nixon’s thoughts on the 40th anniversary of his “War on Drugs”

Get the facts about Nixon’s War on Marijuana Consumers – Pre-Order your copy of NORML’s Big Book of Marijuana Facts today!

Since 1900, we have spent as much time fighting a war on drugs as we spent fighting wars in countries.

It was forty years ago today,
Richard Nixon taught the world to hate
The people who would smoke a weed
Protesting war and hate and greed.
So may I introduce to you
The war you’ve known for all these years,
Richard Nixon’s Hopeless War on Drugs.

Download audio file (Richard-Nixon-Public-enemy-number-1-full.mp3)
 Nixon speaks to TV reporters and refers to drug users as “Public Enemy Number One”.

This does not look like a government bureaucracy going anywhere anytime soon.

It’s Richard Nixon’s Fascist War on Drugs,
For forty years it’s tried and failed,
It’s Richard Nixon’s Classist War on Drugs,
Where 20 million went to jail.
Richard Nixon’s Racist, Richard Nixon’s Futile,
Richard Nixon’s Hopeless War on Drugs.

Download audio file (Richard-Nixon-Left-wingers-push-dope.mp3)
 Nixon from the White House Tapes speaking to aides about how weak societies support homosexuality and drugs and that’s why the left wing supports them in order to destroy America and turn it Communist.

While condemning drugs, drug users, and popular rock culture, Nixon still found time to make Elvis Presley a special agent of the DEA. Yes, it's true.

It’s terrible to be here,
It’s certainly a shame.
You’re such a fine United States,
We’d like to see you change the stakes,
We’d love to end this war.

Download audio file (Richard-Nixon-Poppy-killing-insects.mp3)
 Nixon discusses with his Secretary of Agriculture how they might breed an insect that would kill poppies in the field.

Good thing we declared War on Drugs, otherwise more than 100 million Americans would have tried it!

We so really need to stop the show,
So I thought that you might like to know,
That we’ve spent a trillion bucks on war,
Against people who are mostly poor.
So let us introduce to you
The case for legalizing herb
End Richard Nixon’s Hopeless War on Drugs.

Download audio file (Richard-Nixon-Turned-the-Corner-on-Drug-Addiction.mp3)
 Nixon explains how after just one year into the War on Drugs, we’ve “turned the corner on drug addiction”.

(with apologies to Lennon and McCartney… but something tells me they’d agree…)

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