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Doctors’ Group Calls for Ban on Most Vaping Products

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 20, 2019 — The American Medical Association (AMA) is calling for a ban on all e-cigarettes and vaping products not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to help people quit smoking tobacco cigarettes.

The move is in response to a sharp rise in youth e-cigarette use and an outbreak of more than 2,000 illnesses and 40-plus deaths caused by vaping-related lung illness.

“The recent lung illness outbreak has alarmed physicians and the broader public health community and shined a light on the fact that we have very little evidence about the short- and long-term health consequences of e-cigarettes and vaping products,” AMA president Dr. Patrice Harris said.

“It’s simple — we must keep nicotine products out of the hands of young people and that’s why we are calling for an immediate ban on all e-cigarette and vaping products from the market,” Harris said in a news release from the group.

Besides preventing kids from ever using nicotine, Harris said it’s “critical that there is research into nicotine-addiction treatments for this population.”

The ban on e-cigarettes and vaping products was one of a number of anti-nicotine policies adopted at a recent AMA meeting in San Diego.

Doctors, residents and medical students also called for funding of research to assess the safety and effectiveness of e-cigarette and vaping products in helping people quit smoking cigarettes, and a study of drug and non-drug treatments for nicotine addiction in young people.

Pharmacies should also stop selling tobacco products, the group said.

In the past, the AMA has urged media companies to reject advertising that markets e-cigarette products to young people and supported laws making 21 the minimum age to buy tobacco products, including e-cigarettes.

“Since declaring e-cigarette use and vaping an urgent public health epidemic in 2018, the AMA has pushed for more stringent policies to help protect our nation’s young people from the harmful effects of tobacco and nicotine use,” Harris said.

“For decades, we have led the public health fight to combat the harmful effects of tobacco products, and we will continue to support policies and regulations aimed at preventing another generation from becoming dependent on nicotine,” Harris concluded.

More information

The American Lung Association has more on e-cigarettes.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: November 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Why Vaping Is the Best Way to Trick Yourself Into Quitting

Smoking is, by far, one of the toughest habits to kick. While the nicotine contained in cigarettes is a highly addictive substance, the habit itself becomes a type of addiction. It’s easy to become dependent on cigarettes and to feel like your day won’t be complete without them. They can feel like a nice treat after lunch or at the end of a long day at work. It’s even tempting when you’re sitting on a patio and enjoying a cold beer or a glass of wine. Many people who have tried going ‘cold turkey’ have found it almost impossible to maintain.

Because smoking is such a physical act (you go outside, light up, and have a few minutes to yourself), it’s hard to quit the habit. But then, if you’re looking for an alternative that gives you the same feeling and type of experience, vaping may be a great option for you to try. Vaping can also be a much cheaper option, as you won’t be buying pack after pack. Instead, you simply recharge your device and top up the liquid capsules or pods every so often.

The benefits of vaping are endless. You’ll start to feel yourself breathing with more ease in just a few days. If you had a cough, this should also disappear. You may also notice that your senses, such as your sense of smell, return to normal. You won’t have to worry that you and your clothes always smell like an ashtray. In fact, lots of people who have made the switch say that they actually find the smell of smoke repellent since they started vaping. Plus, you’ll still get to enjoy going outside for a moment to yourself.

In addition to all of these positives, there are a lot of stylish, easy-to-use vapes on the market. The most popular of these is probably JUUL. With its sleek and unobtrusive design, it’s easy to see why JUULs are dominating the e-cigarette marketplace.

JUUL vapes require pods, which contain nicotine salts and come in a wide range of flavors, including mint, vanilla, and berry. They are designed to give you peak nicotine hit in five minutes. This is roughly the same as a regular cigarette, so when you’re vaping, you shouldn’t get any niggling cravings for a ‘real’ cigarette. Start by trying the JUUL Starter Kit, which comes with everything you need to get started. You’ll be provided with the vape itself, four different flavored pods, and the JUUL magnetic, fast-charging USB cable, so that you can try it out immediately.

Once you’ve successfully switched from cigarettes to electronic cigarettes, you can start to ration yourself down. Hopefully, in time, you’ll no longer feel the need to vape at all. For now, it’s a perfect way to make the transition to a smoke-free life in no time. Plus, you’ll be doing yourself a huge favor by giving up cigarettes in the meantime!

Shane Dwyer
Author: Shane Dwyer
Shane Dwyer is a cannabis advocate who isn’t afraid to tell the world about it! You can find his views, rants, and tips published regularly at The 420 Times.

Marijuana & Cannabis News – The 420 Times

Apple Removes Vaping Apps From Store

Nov. 15, 2019 — Apple said Friday that it’s removed 181 vaping-related apps from its mobile App Store worldwide.

The company said the now-banned apps — a mix of stores, social networks, news and games — will continue to work for people who already have them and can be transferred to new devices, CNN reported.

In June, Apple halted the promotion of vaping products in its app store and has not approved any new vaping-related apps since then.

“Recently, experts ranging from the CDC to the American Heart Association have attributed a variety of lung injuries and fatalities to e-cigarette and vaping products, going so far as to call the spread of these devices a public health crisis and a youth epidemic. We agree, and we’ve updated our App Store Review Guidelines to reflect that apps encouraging or facilitating the use of these products are not permitted,” the company said in a statement.

The removal of the vaping-related apps was welcomed by groups such as the American Heart Association and the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

“By taking e-cigarette related apps off the App Store, Apple will help reduce youth exposure to e-cigarette marketing and discourage youth use of these products. Apple is setting a welcome example of corporate responsibility in protecting our kids,” Matthew Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, said in a statement, CNN reported.

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Are Vaping Bans the Way to Go?

CDC: “Outbreak of Lung Injury Associated with the Use of E-Cigarette, or Vaping, Products,” Nov. 14, 2019.

News release, House Committee on Energy and Commerce, Nov. 13, 2019.

Public Health Law Center: “States and Tribes Stepping in to Protect Communities from the Dangers of E-cigarettes: Actions and Options (2019).”

Peter Grinspoon, MD, instructor, Harvard Medical School; board member, Doctors for Cannabis Regulation.

Michael Siegel, MD, professor of community health sciences, Boston University School of Public Health.

Meredith Berkman, co-founder, Parents Against Vaping.

National Conference of State Legislatures: State, governor, and department of health actions.

News releases, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Nov. 13, 2019.

National Youth Tobacco Survey, November 2019.

Journal of the American Heart Association: “Electronic Cigarette Use Prevalence, Associated Factors, and Pattern by Cigarette Smoking Status in the United States From NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) 2013-2014.”

News release, Cannabis Control Commission, Nov. 12, 2019.

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Colorado Pot Industry Bans Additive Linked to Vaping Illness

Colorado has banned the state’s marijuana industry from adding vitamin E acetate, the chemical additive linked to vaping illnesses by federal health officials, to products meant for inhalation.

On November 8, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced a potential culprit behind the recent vaping illnesses: vitamin E acetate. However, Colorado’s Marijuana Enforcement Division had already prohibited the additive as an ingredient days earlier, and also banned two more ingredients with connections to short- and long-term health issues. In addition to vitamin E acetate, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and medium chain triglycerides (MCT oil) are now ruled out for marijuana products meant for inhalation.

The new MED rules, announced November 5, take effect on January 1, 2020, but have been proposed and discussed at rulemaking meetings over the fall.

Over the past several months, more than 2,000 people nationwide have have been hospitalized and at least 39 have died because of lung illnesses connected to vaporizer products. At least one of those deaths and a handful of hospital visits have happened in Colorado. Both marijuana and nicotine products have been linked to cases in this state; no specific vaping product has been named in connection with the Colorado death.

The vast majority of users who became sick from marijuana vaping products were using black-market cartridges with traces of harmful pesticides and additives, though at least one death was reportedly connected to a legal product purchased from a dispensary in Oregon.

Marijuana Deals Near You

A chemical additive originally used in lotions and skin creams, vitamin E acetate has been found in black-market vaping cartridges, where it’s been used to prevent viscosity. Although it was suggested as playing a role in the illnesses early on, the CDC was careful not to officially link the chemical to the illnesses. That changed on November 8, when CDC Deputy Director Anne Schucha called vitamin E “one very strong culprit of concern” after samples taken from 29 patients in ten states showed “direct evidence of vitamin E acetate at the primary site of injury within the lungs.”

However, Schucha then added this in announcing the findings: “Identifying a collection of information that points to vitamin E acetate as a concern for lung pathology doesn’t mean that there are not other components causing lung harm.” 


Toke of the Town

Double Lung Transplant in Vaping Case a Success

Nov. 12, 2019 — The first double lung transplant done as a result of a vaping injury is a success, with the 17-year-old high school athlete on the road to recovery, doctors at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit said Tuesday.

Doctors did the 6-hour transplant Oct. 15 after the patient’s situation became more and more critical. Doctors describing the surgery at a news conference Tuesday said the lung injury came entirely from vaping.

“What I saw in his lungs is something I never saw before, and I have been doing lung transplants for 20 years,” said Hassan Nemeh, MD, surgical director of thoracic organ transplant at Henry Ford Hospital. He was one of three surgeons on the transplant team. “This is an evil I have not faced before.”

The patient, previously an active high schooler, is still hospitalized. He is close to being transferred to rehab and is expected to be able to return to school. Nemeh said he hopes the teen will talk about the dangers of vaping. “I would expect him to be an advocate to stop this madness.”

The donor was healthy, Nemeh said, but gave no further details.

The severity of the teen’s condition quickly put him high on the national waiting list, Nemeh said.

The teen was admitted to a hospital on Sept. 5 and needed intubation by Sept. 12. On Sept. 17, he was hooked up to a heart-lung machine treatment called ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) to keep him alive. He continued to decline and was transferred to Henry Ford on Oct. 3, then put on the waiting list on Oct. 8.

The family of the teen asked for privacy but asked the medical team to share a statement: “He has gone from the typical life of a perfectly healthy 16-year-old athlete — attending high school, hanging out with friends, sailing and playing video games — to waking up intubated and with two new lungs, facing a long and painful recovery process as he struggles to regain his strength and mobility, which has been severely impacted.”

He turned 17 while in the hospital, doctors said.

Lung Transplants in the U.S.

In 2018, 2,530 lung transplant procedures (including both single and double) were done in the U.S., according to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. No breakdown is available on what percent were double.

There are now 1,422 patients on the waiting list for a lung.

During the procedure, a surgeon removes the diseased lung or lungs and attaches the donor lung or lungs to the airway and the blood vessels that lead to and away from the heart. In some cases, the lungs are transplanted along with a donor heart.

Among the common reasons for a transplant are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung scarring from pulmonary fibrosis, high blood pressure in the lungs known as pulmonary hypertension, or cystic fibrosis, a hereditary disorder that affects the lungs.

Experts Weigh In

A transplant is called for only when there’s severe lung damage, says Wayne Tsuang, MD, an assistant professor of medicine at Cleveland Clinic and a practicing lung transplant pulmonologist. He was not involved in the Detroit patient’s medical care.

“It would have to be end-stage lung disease, in that all the potential medical treatments were exhausted and the team taking good care of him had no other options to salvage his lungs,” he says.

Among those options are oxygen, prescribing steroids to lessen the inflammation in the lungs, and giving antibiotics if pneumonia sets in.

“There are different criteria for different diseases, but overall, very severe lung disease [has to be present],” agrees Mangala Narasimhan, DO, regional director of critical care medicine and a pulmonologist at Northwell Health, New Hyde Park, NY. She was not involved in the Detroit patient’s medical care.

In general, Tsuang says, 1-year survival is about 85%, while 50% of transplant recipients are alive at 5 years. The range varies greatly and depends on things like other health conditions that may be present.

“The median survival for all adult recipients is 6.5 years,” says Narasimhan, citing 2018 national statistics.

The long recovery includes taking anti-rejection medications for the rest of the patient’s life. Often, that involves a dozen new medications, Tsuang says.

Sources

News conference, Henry Ford Health System, Nov. 12, 2019.

Wayne Tsuang, MD, assistant professor of medicine and lung transplant pulmonologist, Cleveland Clinic.

Mangala Narasimhan, DO, regional director of critical care medicine and pulmonologist, Northwell Health, New Hyde Park, NY.

Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network.

© 2019 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Ask a Stoner: Do Dabs Carry the Same Risks as Vaping?

Dear Stoner: Is the wax and shatter sold at dispensaries made of the same stuff in vapes? I’m worried that dabbing will get me sick.
Jimmy D.

Dear Jimmy: It can be, but in this case that’s probably not a bad thing. There are THC vaping cartridges filled only with cannabis oil, whether it’s purified distillate, live resin or CO2-extracted oil. Most extractors slightly heat the concentrate to make it thinner for combustion, but it’s essentially the same stuff that you’re dabbing. And none of those products have yet been linked to vaping-related illnesses.

Dean Ween's Honey Pot Lounge is open and ready for dabbing.

Dean Ween’s Honey Pot Lounge is open and ready for dabbing.

Jacqueline Collins

The vast majority of hospital visits and deaths related to vaping have been linked to black-market products, which have been found to contain potentially harmful chemical additives and traces of pesticides. However, some of the vaping illnesses have been connected to additives in products sold in legal, regulated cannabis markets. Those additives are used to make hash more combustible for vaping, though, and aren’t used in the production of the hash you’re dabbing.

Still, just because there’s no vape liquid doesn’t mean the concentrate itself is necessarily safe, as hash extracted from moldy or pesticide-laden cannabis is even more toxic than the plants themselves.

Send questions to marijuana@westword.com.


Toke of the Town

Why You Should Consider Vaping CBD?

According to various studies, vaping CBD offers a bioavailability rate of about 34 to 46%, which is quite higher than other consumption techniques. And that’s the main reason why more people are now switching to vaping a way of consuming CBD. But before you kick start your journey to vaping, it is imperative to understand what vape pens are and how to use them. Keep reading to learn more!

CBD Vape Pens: The Basics

CBD vape pens are essentially designed to resemble an e-cigarette. Most people are already conversant with e-cigarettes, which are often utilized with an e-liquid containing nicotine. Generally speaking, e-cigarettes were crated as a safer alternative to traditional smoking.

Vape pens are long, cylindrical and narrow. In fact, they can comfortably fit in the hand. They often work by heating up the liquid to vaporization converting it into vapor. All vaporizers feature the same kind of parts. A mouthpiece to breathe through, a chamber for your e-juice, as well as a battery. Nonetheless, they all work differently- the choice you make depends on your specific vaping needs.

Why Use Disposable Vape Pens?

If you opt to vape your CBD, then consider starting out with a disposable vaping device. They’re affordable and perhaps not the most powerful models available on the market, but they perform their job pretty well. They’re perfect for giving you a taste of vaping to see if you actually like it.

Even more, they come preloaded with e-liquid. The manufacturer will let you know how much CBD the cartridge contains as well as how many inhalations you’ll be able to take before it’s used up.

Most of these pens don’t demand any skill to operate. Many of them come pre-charged, so you won’t really need to charge the device up. Typically, you’ll just need to pull the gadget via the mouthpiece and it will be automatically activated by your breathing. When you inhale, the device heats and vaporizes the e-juice, and then you release a massive cloud of flavorful vapor when you breathe out. It’s that easy!

How to Utilize a CBD Vape Pen

Utilizing CBD vape pens hugely depends on the specific model you purchase. If you’re a newbie to vaping, you may want to consider investing in the disposable vape pens. They’re cheap, efficient, and easy to use. And they’re perfectly suited to those who’re planning to vape on a short-term basis.

Other CBD vaporizers are ideal for those you intend to vape the long-term. Whilst they come with higher initial costs, they’re definitely worth it, especially if you’re going to vape a lot. But you should always be careful to store your pen appropriately and keep it charged always.

Conclusion

Vaping CBD is an efficient way of ingesting the cannabinoid. But you’ll need to purchase a vape pen that’s well-suited to your particular needs. There are numerous things to take into consideration, including cost, longevity, e-liquid strength, style, as well as battery life. And when all these are catered for, it will be extremely simple utilizing your device. Https://blazedvapes.com/ stocks some of the best vape products- so you can always find something convenient for your vaping needs.

Shane Dwyer
Author: Shane Dwyer
Shane Dwyer is a cannabis advocate who isn’t afraid to tell the world about it! You can find his views, rants, and tips published regularly at The 420 Times.

Marijuana & Cannabis News – The 420 Times

‘Chemical Burns’ May Be Vaping Lung Damage Source

Oct. 3, 2019 — Lung injuries from vaping probably result from tissue damage caused by noxious chemical fumes, rather than from organic compounds in the lungs, data suggest.

“We were not surprised by what we found, regarding toxicity,” Brandon T. Larsen, MD, PhD, a surgical pathologist at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, AZ, and a national expert in lung pathology, says in a news release.

“We have seen a handful of cases, scattered individual cases, over the past 2 years where we’ve observed the same thing, and now we are seeing a sudden spike in cases. Our study offers the first detailed review of the abnormalities that may be seen in lung biopsies to help clinicians and pathologists make a diagnosis,” Larsen says.

To learn more about the vaping-associated lung injuries, Larsen and colleagues studied lung biopsies from 17 patients (13 men; median age, 35 years) who said they vaped and who were suspected of having lung injuries from it. Two of the patients were from the Mayo Clinic, and the others were from elsewhere in the United States. Most (71%) of them vaped with marijuana or cannabis oils.

The findings were published online Oct. 2 in TheNew England Journal of Medicine.

All of the lung biopsy specimens revealed “patterns of acute lung injury,” a type of pneumonia, and other problems, the authors say.

The researchers saw no evidence of tissue damage from lipids such as mineral oils, which until now have been a suspected cause of vaping-linked lung injuries.

“While we can’t discount the potential role of lipids, we have not seen anything to suggest this is a problem caused by lipid accumulation in the lungs. Instead, it seems to be some kind of direct chemical injury, similar to what one might see with exposures to toxic chemical fumes, poisonous gases and toxic agents,” Larsen says in the news release.

More than 800 lung injury cases have been linked to vaping during the past months, and at least 17 patients ihave died. Investigators believe products that contain THC or other cannabis oils such as cannabidiol may be involved.

Continued

Some states have temporarily banned the sale of e-cigarettes or the flavored liquids used in the products, pending health investigations. The FDA is considering banning all nontobacco-flavored vaping liquids. The CDC cautions that children, young adults, pregnant women, and adults who don’t use tobacco products should not use e-cigarettes, and the American Lung Association says e-cigarettes are not safe and can cause permanent lung injury and disease.

“Everyone should recognize that vaping is not without potential risks, including life-threatening risks, and I think our research supports that,” Larsen says. “It would seem prudent based on our observations to explore ways to better regulate the industry and better educate the public, especially our youth, about the risks associated with vaping.”

Medscape Medical News

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