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You Won’t Get Sued If You Do CPR, Review Suggests

By Alan Mozes
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Nov. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Are you worried about getting sued if you provide bystander CPR in a public place?

Don’t be, surprising new research suggests: You’re more likely to get sued if you don’t intervene.

Dr. Travis Murphy undertook the most comprehensive review to date of jury verdicts, settlements, and appellate opinions focused on lawsuits involving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). His team analyzed 170 cases launched between 1989 and 2019 across all 50 states.

And, Murphy said, the data shows that “no non-medical person has been successfully sued for providing bystander CPR” to those who appear to be in cardiac arrest or trouble.

“There have been far more cases brought due to delays in [providing] CPR rather than for providing CPR,” he added.

Murphy, who is an emergency medicine attending physician and a fellow in surgical critical care at the University of Florida in Gainesville, said nearly all the CPR cases (167 out of 170) involved an allegation of negligence, namely not providing CPR when it might’ve helped. In sum, those cases generated punitive damages of roughly $ 620 million.

Of the three cases in which defendants were charged with battery assault because they did administer CPR, only one was convicted. And that was because “the patient already had a signed ‘Do Not Resuscitate’ order and received CPR anyway in their nursing home,” Murphy explained. The nursing home paid more than $ 121,000 in damages.

The other two cases were ruled in favor of the bystanders. And that, said Murphy, suggests that bystanders are very well protected by “Good Samaritan” laws.

“The laws vary from state to state,” he explained, and some states do have limitations in place. For example, Kentucky statutes only protect bystanders who offer CPR assistance if they are medically trained.

But most states fully protect bystanders who sincerely try to help, Murphy stressed. Some states even have “Duty to Act” laws that establish fines specifically for bystanders who are medically trained to provide CPR but choose not to help when an emergency unfolds. (Minnesota, Rhode Island and Vermont are three such examples.)

Continued

The findings come as little surprise to Dr. Michael Kurz, an associate professor in the department of emergency medicine with UAB Medicine and the Alabama Resuscitation Center in Birmingham.

“There is good scientific literature that suggests that the risk of liability when you stand up in this regard is miniscule, if it exists at all,” Kurz said.

But what should a bystander do if he/she is not trained in CPR?

Murphy said, “Ideally, we would like to see more people trained in CPR. But understanding that not everyone will be trained, calling 911 immediately would be the best course of action, since this is so time-sensitive.”

That thought was seconded by Kurz, who also serves as chair of the American Heart Association’s task force for telecommunicator CPR.

“In general, we encourage the lay public to render aid that they feel comfortable with,” he said. “But any assistance is better than no assistance. Because the alternative in the face of a cardiac arrest is the patient dies if no assistance is given,” Kurz added.

“So you can call 911, and the dispatcher can send appropriate help. But then, in addition, [they] can also provide ‘just in time’ simple CPR instructions over the phone within 20 seconds. That’s all you need to be instructed on how to do it in an emergency, with absolutely no prior training,” Kurz explained.

Murphy’s findings are scheduled for presentation at the American Heart Association meeting, in Philadelphia, Nov. 16 to 18.

Research presented at medical meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Travis Murphy, M.D., emergency medicine attending physician, and fellow, surgical critical care, University of Florida, Gainesville; Michael Christopher Kurz, M.D., M.S., associate professor, department of emergency medicine, UAB Medicine, Alabama Resuscitation Center, Birmingham,  and chair, Task Force for Telecommunicator CPR, American Heart Association; American Heart Association meeting, Philadelphia, Nov. 16-18, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Opioids Won’t Help Arthritis Patients Long-Term: Study

SATURDAY, Nov. 9, 2019 — Opioid painkillers may temporarily ease the discomfort of arthritis, but they have no clear lasting benefit, a research review finds.

In an analysis of 23 clinical trials, researchers found that, on average, opioid medications were somewhat effective at easing pain in patients with osteoarthritis. That’s the common form of arthritis in which cartilage cushioning the joints gradually wears down, leading to swelling, stiffness and pain.

But the trials found no evidence that opioids improved patients’ quality of life or helped with their depression. And any benefits for pain seemed to wane with time.

“We found that the magnitude of these effects is small and continues to decrease over time,” said lead researcher Dr. Raveendhara Bannuru. He is director of the Center for Treatment Comparison and Integrative Analysis at Tufts Medical Center, in Boston.

Treatment guidelines for chronic pain, other than cancer-related pain, already say opioids should be a last resort.

With osteoarthritis, Bannuru said, the drugs are only recommended if a patient has not gotten relief from other medical therapies, and if surgery — like knee or hip replacement — is not an option.

Instead, patients should try to exercise regularly and maintain a healthy lifestyle. As for medications, Bannuru said, topical versions of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) — like ibuprofen and naproxen — are a “first choice.”

These creams or ointments help people avoid the side effects that can come with prolonged used of oral NSAIDs (such as Motrin, Advil, Aleve), Bannuru noted. Injections of hyaluronic acid, a substance in joint fluids, are another option, he said.

In addition, aerobic activity, like walking, and exercises that strengthen the muscles around the arthritic joint can be helpful, according to Dr. Steven Eyanson, a rheumatologist who was not involved in the study.

And if a patient is overweight, shedding some pounds can help ease pain and improve joint function, said Eyanson, a retired adjunct assistant professor at the University of Iowa in Iowa City.

“In the case of osteoarthritis, the benefits of therapy by opioid pain relief are very limited,” Eyanson said.

Bannuru was scheduled to present the findings Saturday at the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, in Atlanta. Research presented meetings is generally considered preliminary until it is published in a peer-reviewed journal.

For the study, the researchers pooled the results of 23 previously published clinical trials that involved more than 11,400 osteoarthritis patients.

Overall, the investigators found, opioid treatment had a modest effect on people’s pain over two to 12 weeks. At higher doses, the drugs were actually less effective, and carried a higher risk of side effects, such as nausea, constipation and diarrhea.

“In light of dependency concerns and the discomfort that many patients feel while taking the drugs, it would appear that there is no optimal therapeutic window for the use of oral opioids in osteoarthritis,” Bannuru said.

The results come during a national crisis of opioid addiction that, according to government figures, is killing 130 Americans each day.

After years of skyrocketing, prescriptions for opioids — like OxyContin, Vicodin and Percocet — have been declining since 2012, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In recent years, illegal opioids — like heroin and illicitly manufactured fentanyl — have become the biggest concern.

Still, prescription opioids were involved in 36% of opioid overdose deaths in 2017, the CDC says.

“We hope the results of our study will empower osteoarthritis patients to have informed discussions with their health care providers about the safest and most effective treatment options for their pain,” Bannuru said.

Eyanson said that, to him, “the take-home messages are that opioids have limited benefit in osteoarthritis pain control, and have significant potential for risk.”

Most osteoarthritis patients will benefit from a “more holistic approach” — including medication and non-drug therapies, and in some cases, surgery, he added.

More information

The Arthritis Foundation has more on treating osteoarthritis.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: November 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

All That Screen Time Won’t Hurt Your Kid’s Grades – Maybe

By Dennis Thompson        
       HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Sept. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Parents can relax a little about how much time their kids spend in front of screens, new research suggests.

A large review of the scientific evidence on the topic concluded that media time overall is not associated with the academic performance of children or teens.

But the more time kids spend watching TV or playing video games, the more likely their grades will suffer, the international team of scientists led by Mireia Adelantado-Renau, from the University Jaume I in Castellon, Spain, found.

It makes a funny sort of sense, once you take a step back and realize how pervasive TVs, smartphones and laptops have become in modern society, said Dr. Victor Fornari, vice chair of child and adolescent psychiatry at Zucker Hillside Hospital in Glen Oaks, N.Y.

“This study just clarifies for me that life in the 21st century is so vastly different than it was 50 years ago. Tasks we used to do unrelated to a screen now involve a screen,” Fornari said. “Reading a book is on a tablet now, and reading a magazine in on your laptop, and playing a game is a video game, and connecting with friends means you’re on social media.”

This evidence should prove reassuring to parents, said Fornari, who was not involved in the review.

“It’s important for parents to know there’s no real data to suggest that a large amount of screen time interferes with function,” Fornari said. “These studies show it’s really not the amount of the screen time, but the quality of the screen time.

“If you watch more television, then you’re not studying or reading,” Fornari said. “We know many kids find themselves addicted to video games and are playing hours and hours a day and not devoting their time to reading a book or studying for an exam.”

For this new report, Adelantado-Renau and colleagues reviewed 58 studies on screen time from 23 countries, involving more than 480,000 kids aged 4 to 18. They also combined the results of 30 studies involving 106,000 children to delve deeper into the potential effects of screen time on learning.

Continued

It turns out that it’s not the total screen time that matters, but what the kid does with the screen.

Television viewing was linked to lower academic scores as well as math and language skills, the researchers found, while video gaming was linked to poorer grades. The researchers did say the study only found an association — it didn’t prove one causes the other.

The new review was published Sept. 23 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

In the future, researchers will need to do a better job breaking down exactly what kids are doing with their screens, said Janis Whitlock, a research scientist with the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y.

Passive screen activities appear to be more harmful to grades, as well as activities like video gaming that can prove a powerful distraction, said Whitlock, who wrote an editorial accompanying the review.

“I also suspect we’re talking about a lot of TV,” Whitlock added. “We’re not talking about a couple of shows a night, I don’t think. These are kids who are spending huge amounts of time passively watching television.”

The same goes for video games. “Video games can become a really major time suck,” Whitlock said. “Gamers have a really hard time stopping. You can go on for hours and hours.”

Parents should monitor their kids’ screen use to make sure they use the devices in beneficial ways and keep distractions to a minimum, she said.

“Don’t assume your child can self-regulate,” Whitlock said. “They can’t. They really can’t. It’s a rare young person who can do that. Parents need to be aware and they need to provide pretty strong guidelines about when and where and how devices will be used, and for what.”

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCES: Victor Fornari, M.D., vice chair, child and adolescent psychiatry, Zucker Hillside Hospital, Glen Oaks, N.Y.; Janis Whitlock, Ph.D., M.P.H., research scientist, Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.; Sept. 23, 2019,JAMA Pediatrics

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Giving Your Child a Time-Out Won’t Cause Long-Term Damage: Study

SUNDAY, Sept. 22, 2019 — Time-outs don’t increase kids’ risk of emotional or behavioral problems, according to a new study that researchers say dispels misleading information.

The study included the children of nearly 1,400 U.S. parents. Of those parents, 28% said they used time-outs when their child was 3 years old.

From age 3 through fifth-grade, there were no differences in emotional and behavioral health between children who had time-outs and those who did not, the investigators found.

Rachel Knight, an assistant professor of clinical psychology at University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital in Ann Arbor, led the study, which was published online recentlyin the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics.

“No differences were found with respect to child internalizing problems, including anxiety and depression, externalizing problems, including aggression and rule-breaking behavior, or self-control,” Knight’s team reported.

The authors noted that time-out is one of the only child discipline strategies recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Even though extensive research has shown it to be effective, some online information and media reports have claimed time-outs increase the risk of behavioral problems and damage parent-child relationships, the study authors explained.

“Parents often resort to the internet and social media for guidance, but the internet provides inaccurate information for families regarding the use of time-out,” Knight and her colleagues warned.

Research findings on the topic need to be offered in a “readily accessible and easily digestible format … to assuage possible parental concerns and promote the use of this highly effective child discipline strategy,” the study authors urged.

However, as with previous research, the new study linked physical punishment to externalizing behaviors in kids.

“We hope our findings will be helpful to parents who see confusing and at times alarming claims of negative side effects of time-out,” Knight said in a journal news release.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics explains how to give time-outs.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: September 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Shaving ‘Down There’ Won’t Raise STD Risks: Study

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 — Women who shave or wax their pubic hair aren’t more likely to get chlamydia or gonorrhea, according to new research that challenges studies suggesting that so-called extreme grooming increases the risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

The study included 214 women who visited an on-campus location at Ohio State University (OSU) for STD testing.

The women completed a questionnaire about their sexual and grooming behaviors. Nearly all (98%) said they had done some grooming, and between 18% and 54% were extreme groomers, meaning they removed all pubic hair at least weekly during the past year, or at least six times in the past month.

About 10% tested positive for an STD, but there was no association between extreme grooming and the risk of chlamydia or gonorrhea, according to the study published Sept. 4 in the journal PLOS One.

Unlike other studies, this one relied on laboratory-confirmed STD diagnoses, the OSU researchers noted.

“Previous research asked participants if they’d ever had a sexually transmitted infection, but didn’t measure whether they had one at the time of survey. That makes connecting any current grooming habits to STDs difficult,” lead author Jamie Luster said in a university news release. Luster is a former graduate student in public health at Ohio State.

This research also accounted for other factors associated with STD risk, including sexual frequency, income, race and age, noted Maria Gallo, associate professor of epidemiology and Luster’s adviser on the study.

“Particularly concerning is that previous work didn’t adjust for sexual frequency. It could be that women who were having more sex with more people — and were therefore more likely to contract infections — were more likely to be grooming,” Gallo said in the news release.

The study finding wasn’t a surprise because there’s no obvious biological reason to believe that shaving or waxing pubic hair would increase the risk of chlamydia or gonorrhea, said Luster, who is now a researcher at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

About 2.86 million new cases of chlamydia and 820,000 of gonorrhea occur in the United States each year, many in teens and young adults, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

To protect against STDs, the CDC recommends sexually active people stay in a long-term mutually monogamous relationship with an STD-free partner and use latex condoms consistently and properly.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on STD prevention.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: September 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

EPA Won’t Approve Warning Labels for Glyphosate

Aug. 12, 2019 — Warning labels for the suspected cancer-causing weed killer glyphosate (Roundup) won’t be approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer says glyphosate is “probably carcinogenic,” which has led California to require warning labels on glyphosate products, the Associated Press reported.

However, California hasn’t enforced the warning label rule because Roundup maker Monsanto last year obtained a court order blocking the warning labels until the lawsuit is resolved.

The EPA says its research shows the chemical poses no risks to public health and won’t approve warning labels for glyphosate products, the AP reported.

The EPA considers labels warning glyphosate to cause cancer to “constitute a false and misleading statement,” which is prohibited by federal law, Michael Goodis, director of the agency’s registration division in its Office of Pesticide Programs, said in letters to companies explaining the EPA’s stance.

Chandra Lord, a representative for Monsanto’s parent company Bayer AG, said the EPA’s announcement “is fully consistent with the science-based conclusions reached by the agency and leading health regulators worldwide for more than four decades.”

“Glyphosate is not carcinogenic,” Lord said.

It’s unusual for the EPA to tell a state it can’t go beyond the federal requirements, according to Brett Hartl, government affairs director for the Center for Biological Diversity.

“It’s a little bit sad the EPA is the biggest cheerleader and defender of glyphosate,” Hartl told the AP. “It’s the Environmental Protection Agency, not the pesticide protection agency.”

Glyphosate-related lawsuits involving about 13,000 plaintiffs are pending against Monsanto. Juries have awarded damages in each of three cases that went to trial in California.

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Pure CBD Won’t Make You Fail a Drug Test, But…

By Amy Norton
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) — As the CBD craze sweeps the nation, some users may wonder whether the cannabis extract can make them fail a drug test. A preliminary study suggests the answer is “no” — at least if the CBD is pure.

Researchers found that CBD, or cannabidiol, did not react with either of two commercially available tests used to screen for marijuana use. However, another cannabis compound — cannabinol (CBN) — did.

CBD and CBN are two of many chemicals found in cannabis plants. They differ from THC, the source of the marijuana “high.” CBD is present in marijuana but more abundant in hemp — cannabis plants that have little THC. CBN, meanwhile, is a THC derivative.

If you think CBD products are suddenly everywhere, you’re right: There has been an explosion since last year, when Congress lifted a decades-old ban on growing hemp.

Licensed farmers can now grow the plant, as long as it contains less than 0.3% THC. The result? CBD is turning up in everything from oils and lotions to coffee and cookies.

CBD is promoted for easing anxiety, insomnia and chronic pain, among other ailments. The jury is still out on those uses, but there is some science behind the compound. Last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a drug containing pure CBD — called Epidiolex — for treating certain rare, severe seizures.

CBN, meanwhile, is far less famous than its cousin, but it is used in products marketed as sleep aids.

Given that context, it’s important to understand how the compounds interact with drug screening tests, said Grace Kroner, lead researcher on the new study.

She and her colleagues at the University of Utah Health Sciences Center in Salt Lake City spiked three batches of urine samples with CBD, CBN and two other cannabis compounds — cannabichromene and cannabigerol.

The researchers tested each batch with two tests commonly used for THC screening. CBN reacted with one, while the other three compounds triggered no false-positives.

Why did only one test pick up CBN? The tests are known immunoassays — which means they use antibodies to detect drugs. Kroner explained that there are slight differences in the antibodies that test manufacturers use — so it’s possible to get different results.

Continued

While the findings may be a relief to some CBD users, there is a big caveat: The researchers used pure CBD. In the real world, CBD products are largely unregulated and may contain other compounds due to processing.

According to Robert Fitzgerald, a professor at the University of California, San Diego’s Center for Advanced Laboratory Medicine, “It would depend on the purity of the product.”

On the positive side, he noted, immunoassays are only screening tests. They would be followed up by “confirmatory testing” that does distinguish THC from other compounds. But you could still have a problem if your cannabis product was contaminated with THC, Fitzgerald said.

Legally, Kroner noted, CBD products should only be produced from hemp plants with no more than 0.3% THC. But there’s no way for consumers to know for sure what’s in the products they buy.

A 2017 study found that about seven out of 10 CBD products did not contain the amount of cannabidiol stated on the label. And about one in five contained THC.

A false-positive on a drug test could have implications for people at work, and in their medical care. For example, some health care organizations do not allow patients to start opioid painkillers if they use marijuana.

It all points to the importance of taking “cross-reactivity” into account when a drug screening test comes back positive, Kroner said.

“Confirmatory testing should be done before any clinical decisions are made,” she said.

What should you do if you use any of these products and have a drug test coming up?

The simplest course is to refrain for a while, according to Kroner. But she also advised being up front about your CBD or CBN use — or any supplement use, for that matter — so that your test results can be interpreted in that light.

Kroner reported the findings Monday at the annual meeting of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry in Anaheim, Calif. Studies presented at meetings are generally considered preliminary until they are published in a peer-reviewed journal.

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Sources

SOURCES: Grace Kroner, Ph.D., fellow, clinical chemistry, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City; Robert Fitzgerald, Ph.D., professor,  pathology, Center for Advanced Laboratory Medicine, University of California, San Diego; Aug. 5, 2019, presentation, American Association for Clinical Chemistry annual meeting, Anaheim, Calif.

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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EPA Won’t Ban Pesticide Linked to Harm in Children

July 19, 2019 — Even though the pesticide chlorpyrifos has been linked to brain harm in children, it will not be banned in the United States, the Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday.The agency said data highlighting health concerns about the pesticide was “not sufficiently valid, complete or reliable,” and added that it would continue to monitor the safety of chlorpyrifos through 2022, The New York Times reported.

In 2015, the Obama administration said it would ban chlorpyrifos after EPA studies showed that the pesticide could damage brain development in children. That ban was reversed by the Trump administration in 2017, which triggered legal challenges.

In April, a federal appeals court gave the EPA a July deadline to issue a final ruling on whether to ban chlorpyrifos, The Times reported.

One of the groups that challenged the 2017 Trump administration decision on chlorpyrifos was Earthjustice, which acted on behalf of farmworker organizations and others.

“By allowing chlorpyrifos to stay in our fruits and vegetables, Trump’s EPA is breaking the law and neglecting the overwhelming scientific evidence that this pesticide harms children’s brains,” Patti Goldman, a lawyer for Earthjustice, said in a statement.

She said the groups would continue their legal challenge, The Times reported.

Hawaii banned chlorpyrifos in 2018, and California and New York are considering similar measures. Consumers and environmental groups are urging the European Commission to ban the pesticide.

In the United States, the chemical industry and farmers have lobbied to continue using chlorpyrifos, saying it’s needed to protect crops, The Times reported.

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Longer Grass Won’t Attract Ticks, Study Finds

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) — You now have an excuse to skip cutting the grass every weekend — it’s beneficial for the bees.

And mowing your lawn less often to provide native bees a better habitat won’t lead to an increase in disease-carrying ticks, experts say.

When research ecologist Susannah Lerman began urging friends and colleagues to leave lawns a bit longer to help the bees, the “first thing people said was that letting the grass get longer would invite ticks,” she recalled.

“It was clear that before we could make the case for promoting lawns as bee habitat, we had to understand the tick risk,” Lerman added.

She and Vince D’Amico, a fellow USDA Forest Service research entomologist, studied whether less frequent mowing of 16 residential lawns in Springfield, Mass., over two summers could benefit native bees without increasing the risk of ticks.

The researchers found 111 bee species on the lawns — about one-quarter of all known bee species in Massachusetts. They also dragged a cloth across the lawns in search of ticks. In 144 tick drags, done with grass at various heights and mowing frequencies, they failed to find a single blacklegged tick. Also called deer ticks, the insects can carry Lyme disease, a bacterial infection that can make people seriously ill.

The study was published online April 3 in the journal PLoS One.

The researchers said the study has some “obvious limitations” — they looked for only one species of tick and only studied 16 lawns in a single city.

“Still,” Lerman said, “our study has two significant take-aways: you do not necessarily invite ticks if you mow the lawn every other week instead of every week, and common assumptions about nature are always worth investigating; scientists may be surprised by what we find.”

While there’s no doubt that blacklegged ticks lurk in people’s yards, a lawn is probably too dry for them, according to D’Amico.

“This species needs near 100% humidity for at least part of the day,” he explained in a U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service news release. “Where we have leaf litter, the ticks do very well.”

In the United States, about 40 million acres of lawn managed by homeowners, businesses, government agencies and cemeteries have the potential to become habitat for threatened native bee species.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources


SOURCE: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Northern Research Station, news release, April 3, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

You Won’t Believe What’s Coming in Lord Danger’s ‘Archer’ Promo (Phrasing!)

Do you want ants? Because dropping a sweet music video promo for FXX’s Archer: Nocturnal Missions block is exactly how you get ants. Metaphorically. Shut up!

The new “Danger Zone” spot takes all the classic catchphrases from the adult-targeted animated series, remixes them and pumps up the jam to 11 with the help of director Mike Diva and the team at creative production studio Lord Danger. Supplied with footage from Archer and a few restrictions — like, pretty much none of the coke-fueled Archer Vice action — the shop rejiggered the irreverent spoof series into a wonderfully absurd 60-second sound bite summary.

Archer: Nocturnal Missions is a late-night block on FXX featuring classic Archer episodes, airing on Tuesday and Friday at midnight. Season 9, Danger Island, arrives on DVD April 2, with the 10th (and final) season, Archer: 1999, set to debut on FXX next month as well.

Archer is created by Adam Reed, produced at Floyd County Prod. in Atlanta. The voice cast is led by H. Jon Benjamin as Sterling Archer, Aisha Tyler as Lana Kane, Jessica Walter as Malory Archer, Chris Parnell as Cyril Figgis, Judy Greer as Cheryl Tunt, Amber Nash as Pamela Poovey, Lucky Yates as Dr. Krieger, and Reed as Raymond Gillette.

Lord Danger is a one-stop production solutions shop which has previously masterminded viral sensations “Eat the Ice Cream” for Halo Top and the anime-inspired “Metro Manners” PSAs for the Los Angeles Metro. “Danger Zone” was exec produced by Josh Shadid, produced by Marissa Alanis, with animation & design by Dylan Locke, music by David Dahlquist & creative director Mike Diva, edited by Dan Packer.


Animation Magazine

Colorado Allows Schools to Administer MMJ, So Why Won’t They?

When House Bill 1286 passed last year, advocates thought it would mark the beginning of a new era for children who use medical marijuana. So far, though, they’re still waiting.

The bill expanded on a 2016 law that allowed child patients to take their MMJ medication at school. That law required that the medication be administered by a child’s MMJ caregiver, usually the parents. The newer measure — known as Quintin’s amendment, in honor of nine-year-old epilepsy patient Quintin Lovato in Eagle County — allows school personnel to also administer medication, to help patients faster and ease the burden on parents. The proposal passed through the state legislature by relatively wide margins.

However, of the 178 school districts in Colorado, we found just one district that has implemented the policy so far, and it allows school personnel to administer only CBD medication. That district is Eagle County Schools, the district Lovato attends.

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“Unfortunately, that Eagle County rule is not an example that we want to use in the state. It contradicts itself in nature. In the end, it says the school personnel can administer CBD only,” says Amber Wann, the mother of a young MMJ patient who pushed for the bill. “That’s an issue for the majority of students who need multiple cannabinoids.”

Marijuana Deals Near You

Some children may have to take medication with THC in it one day, like Wann’s teenage son, who has a genetic mutation that results in seizures. Although he currently relies on a hemp-based CBD product, Wann says an emergency could require him to use nasal spray to combat seizures, which can severely harm his health and learning development when left untreated.

Wann’s son currently attends classes in the Douglas County School District, one of the many that don’t allow school personnel to administer marijuana or hemp medication of any kind. While caregivers of child MMJ patients can come to campus and administer the medication, as approved by the 2016 law, if the 2018 update were adopted in Douglas County, school personnel could do it, too.

“If my son has a seizure at school and I had the THC nasal spray, do you know how long it’d take them to call me to get over there, find him and administer it?” Wann asks. “By then, the seizure might be over. School personnel could get it to him in a timely manner and save an emergency situation, but they’re not allowed to.”

Why aren’t school districts allowing school nurses or teachers to give children marijuana medication? The 2018 proposal didn’t make this a requirement, but instead authorized each district’s school board to opt in or out. Nearly nine months after the measure was signed into law, it continues to be a struggle to persuade school boards to opt in, according to Representative Dylan Roberts, the sponsor of Quintin’s amendment.

Roberts, who represents Eagle County, worked with the Lovato family, Wann and other parents of MMJ patients to draft the law in 2018. The opt-in language was always part of the measure, he says, and was included to raise the chances of the bill passing through a legislature wary of forcing schools to break federal laws.

“We knew this was a possibility by making it permissive rather than mandatory, but we made it permissive in good faith,” Roberts says. “I think people like Amber and other moms who were really a key part in getting the bill passed, they were doing that to get their kids the help they needed. They probably foresaw this happening, and it’s unfortunate that it’s coming to pass. But sometimes you pass legislation looking for long-term gains, and I think more districts will jump on board.”

But first, one big domino might have to fall. Nearly all of Colorado’s school districts are members of the Colorado Association of School Boards, a state and federal lobbying organization that advised schools not to opt in to Quintin’s amendment. “Since medical marijuana continues to be considered an illegal controlled substance under federal law, CASB makes sure districts know they’re faced with risks when school personnel administer medical marijuana to a student,” explains CASB communications director Susan Meek.

According to Meek, CASB is waiting for the federal government to amend the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act, a law that bans any schools receiving federal funding from allowing “the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees on its property or as part of any of its activities.” She notes that CASB sent a memo to Congress asking lawmakers to amend the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act to include an exception for MMJ patients who take non-psychoactive cannabinoids — but not THC.

Wann and parents of MMJ patients enrolled in the Castle Rock and Cherry Creek school districts don’t want to wait for Congress, though, and argue that THC should be treated the same as CBD medication in Colorado regardless of its federal status. They’ve even started an advocacy crusade with Colorado for Safe Access, dubbed “The Green Crayon Campaign.”

The campaign encourages parents, caregivers and advocates of young MMJ patients to send green crayons to their respective school’s superintendents and school boards with letters urging them to adopt the law and allow school personnel to administer MMJ.

“These kids don’t need their peers asking about why their mommy is here every day,” Wann says. “This current attitude isn’t surrounded around compassion.”

Toke of the Town

Flu Shot Won’t Cause Miscarriage, Study Confirms

FRIDAY, March 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) A flu shot cannot cause a pregnant woman to miscarry, researchers say.

“This is a very definitive study for a recent, relevant time period of flu and should remove all doubts a woman might have about whether it is safe to be vaccinated during pregnancy,” said co-investigator Dr. Edward Belongia, director of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Population Health at the Marshfield Clinic Research Institute in Wisconsin, CNN reported.

The findings are based on an examination of the 2012-13, 2013-14 and 2014-15 flu seasons and were presented Wednesday to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

The study comes at a time when there is significant focus in the U.S. on the consequences of certain groups telling people to ignore vaccine recommendations, CNN reported.

Not only is a flu shot during pregnancy safe, it’s necessary, said lead investigator James Donahue, a senior epidemiologist at Marshfield.

“There’s lots of evidence of the severity of flu for a pregnant woman, more chance of hospitalization, more risk of death, especially as she enters the second and third trimester,” Donahue said, CNN reported.

“There are also many studies that show the mother’s vaccination will help protect the newborn baby from flu, which is critical since the baby cannot be vaccinated until 6 months of age,” he added.

CDC guidelines emphasize the importance of a flu shot during pregnancy.

“The findings provide a high level of reassurance regarding the safety of influenza vaccine in early pregnancy and through pregnancy and support the current recommendations of an influenza vaccination for all pregnant women,” Donahue said, CNN reported.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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WebMD Health

Getting Flu Shot Annually Won’t Undermine Its Effectiveness in Kids