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ADHD Rates Doubled Among U.S. Adults Over 10 Years

By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Nov. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) — If the latest statistics are any indication, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is no longer an issue for children only.

Over a 10-year period, ADHD rates more than doubled among American adults, new research shows.

However, the rate among children remains much higher than in adults.

“While we can’t pinpoint the source of the increase in ADHD rates in adults, we can surmise that it has to do with growing recognition of ADHD in the adult populations by doctors and service providers, as well as increased public awareness of ADHD overall,” said study co-author Dr. Michael Milham. He is vice president of research at the Child Mind Institute, in New York City.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 5 million Kaiser Permanente Northern California patients, and found that the percentage of adults with a diagnosis of ADHD rose from 0.43% in 2007 to 0.96% in 2016.

White adults showed a larger increase — 0.67% to 1.42% — than those in other racial/ethnic groups.

Adults with other mental health conditions — such as depression, and bipolar, anxiety or eating disorders — were more likely to have ADHD. The researchers also found that adults with ADHD had higher rates of health care use and sexually transmitted infections.

Meanwhile, ADHD diagnoses among children aged 5 to 11 rose from 2.96% in 2007 to 3.74% in 2016, a 26% increase.

The study was published online Nov. 1 in JAMA Network Open.

“More work needs to be done to better understand why rates are higher in white adults, particularly whether there are deficiencies in detection and diagnoses among non-white adults,” Milham said in a journal news release.

“And,” he added, “we must develop more effective diagnostic tools and standards for adults, who, in general, remain more challenging to diagnose than children.”

Study lead author Dr. Winston Chung, a psychiatrist with Kaiser Permanente in San Francisco, noted that people in some cultures are less likely to regard certain behaviors as a disorder or to seek help for them.

“It’s always been just understood that different cultures and races might vary in meaningful ways in how they cope with stress or expressing emotions,” Chung said.

However, “this is something we don’t actually have definitive answers to,” and more research is needed, he added.

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SOURCE:JAMA Network Open, news release, Nov. 1, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Lots of Gluten During Toddler Years Might Raise Odds for Celiac Disease

TUESDAY, Aug. 13, 2019 — Too much white bread and pasta fed to at-risk kids under age 5 could increase their odds of developing celiac disease, a new international study has concluded.

Every extra daily gram of gluten a young child eats increases their risk of celiac disease, if they are genetically predisposed to it, researchers found.

For example, eating an extra half-slice of white bread every day at age 2 can increase a kid’s risk of celiac disease at age 3 by 7%, according to findings published Aug. 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

“The kids who went on to celiac disease were consuming more gluten in their diet in early childhood,” said study co-author Jill Norris, head of epidemiology at the University of Colorado’s School of Public Health.

However, Norris’ team warned it’s too soon to recommend eliminating gluten from the diets of young children, even those with a genetic risk for celiac disease.

“The worry is you would cut out healthy foods high in fiber and other nutrients simply to cut out gluten,” Norris said. “There are ways to remove gluten from the diet and maintain a healthy diet, but it’s actually quite difficult.”

Who’s at risk?

Celiac disease is an immune reaction in the small intestine to gluten, a protein found in some grains. It often causes diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss, bloating, abdominal pain and anemia, and can lead to serious complications.

A person with a parent, child or sibling who has celiac disease carries a 1-in-10 chance of developing the disorder, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation.

It often develops in early childhood, but it hasn’t been clear why some kids at risk for celiac disease wind up with it while others don’t, Norris said.

“Virtually everybody is exposed to gluten during their lifetime, and there are a number of people who we consider genetically at increased risk but they never get the disease,” Norris said. “We’re trying to figure out what’s different about the people who do end up getting the disease.”

For this study, researchers followed more than 6,600 children from birth through age 15 at six clinical research centers in Finland, Germany, Sweden and the United States. All had an inherited risk for celiac disease.

Their diets and gluten intake were tracked based on three-day food diaries taken at regular intervals throughout their lives.

About 18% of the kids developed autoimmune responses related to celiac disease and 7% developed full-blown celiac disease, with the onset of both conditions peaking at 2 to 3 years of age, researchers found.

Every 1-gram increase in daily gluten intake — about a half-slice of white bread — at age 2 was associated with an increased chance of celiac disease by age 3, they concluded.

“We can now confirm that besides certain genes, high intake of gluten also is an important risk factor for celiac disease,” said senior researcher Dr. Daniel Agardh, a pediatrician with the Diabetes and Celiac Disease Unit at Lund University in Sweden.

Tough to ‘micromanage’ diet

Still, more research is needed before doctors can offer parents solid advice about their young child’s diet, experts said.

Other possible factors in celiac disease still need to be considered, such as early childhood infections, changes in gut bacteria, and antibiotic exposure, noted Dr. Jacqueline Jossen. She’s a pediatric gastroenterologist at the Susan and Leonard Feinstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical Center at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

“There’s a lot that was not specifically analyzed in this study, and there is previous literature to suggest those things may have a role as well,” said Jossen, who had no part in the research.

At this point, she wouldn’t recommend any dietary changes based off these findings.

“It’s such a small amount of gluten they’re talking about here. Even half a slice of bread can make a difference? Even on a practical level, it’s hard to micromanage something like that,” Jossen said.

Jossen speaks from experience. She has celiac disease and has a 3-year-old daughter with a genetic predisposition toward the condition.

“Even for me on a personal level, I wouldn’t change her diet based on this yet,” Jossen said of her daughter.

Is testing worth it?

And how do you even know for sure that you or your child is at risk?

Genetic tests for celiac disease risk are available, but often are not covered by insurance, said Dr. Maureen Leonard, clinical director of the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at MassGeneral Hospital for Children in Boston.

“Online commercially available tests do not always assess all compatible genes for celiac disease,” said Leonard, who wrote an editorial published with the study. “Therefore, I would suggest parents speak with their physician about whether a genetic test may be appropriate for their child.”

Agardh doesn’t think genetic testing would be of much help, “since these genes are common in the general population.”

“In fact, the majority of individuals carrying these risk genes eating gluten will not develop celiac disease,” he said.

A second study this week in JAMA Pediatrics found that gluten also can boost children’s risk of developing type 1 diabetes.

Among children with a genetic susceptibility for type 1 diabetes, a high intake of gluten was associated with an increased risk of an immune response that can damage or destroy the body’s ability to produce insulin over time.

“Given that these cereals are eaten by most children daily and are important sources of many essential nutrients, further studies are warranted to confirm or rule out the findings,” said the authors led by Leena Hakola from Tampere University in Finland.

More information

The Celiac Disease Foundation has more about celiac disease.

© 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: August 2019

Drugs.com – Daily MedNews

Childhood Cancer Steals 11 Million Years of Life: Study

By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, July 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Researchers are closing in on the toll of childhood cancer, finding it stole 11.5 million years of healthy life lost worldwide in 2017.

Premature death took 97% of that toll, and impaired quality of life about 3%, the study found.

“Estimating the years of healthy life children have lost due to cancer allows policy makers to compare the lifelong implications of childhood cancer with other diseases, potentially helping them determine the most effective way to spend limited resources and identify high-impact cancer-control planning decisions,” said study leader Lisa Force.

Children in the poorest countries accounted for 82% of years of healthy life lost (9.5 million years) worldwide due to cancer in 2017, according to the study. The findings were published July 29 in The Lancet Oncology.

How common is childhood cancer?

The number of new cancer cases in children and teens up to age 19 was about 416,500 worldwide in 2017, the report said.

Children with cancer in high-income countries tend to have good survival, with around 80% surviving five years after diagnosis. But survival is 35% to 40% in most low- and middle-income countries, with some estimates suggesting it could be as low as 20%, the study authors noted.

Also, about 90% of children at risk of developing cancer live in low- and middle-income countries.

The study examined the years of healthy life that children and teens with cancer lose due to illness, disability and premature death, a measurement called disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). One DALY equals one year of healthy life lost.

However, the study was limited to the first 10 years after cancer diagnosis so it likely underestimates the tally, according to the researchers.

“By assessing the global burden of childhood cancer through the lens of disability-adjusted life years, we can more comprehensively understand the devastating impact of cancer on children globally,” said Force, of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn.

“Our findings are an important first step in establishing that childhood cancer has a role in frameworks that address global oncology and global child health,” Force added in a journal news release.

But future progress will require much work, she explained.

“Improving childhood cancer survival will require considerable planning by policy makers to ensure well-functioning health systems capable of early diagnosis and treatment,” Force said.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE:The Lancet Oncology, news release, July 29, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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DDT Still In Lakes 50 Years After Ban

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Although DDT was banned in the 1970s, the toxic pesticide still lurks in the sediment of lakes in New Brunswick, Canada, researchers report.

To control insects, airplanes sprayed nearly 6,300 tons of DDT onto New Brunswick forests between 1952 and 1968.

Sprayed DDT can enter lakes and rivers, and find its way into the food chain, researchers say.

To see if DDT had an effect on these Canadian lakes, the researchers collected sediment samples from five lakes in New Brunswick.

The sediment reflected conditions from about 1890 to 2016. Analysis showed that DDT levels peaked in the 1970s and 1980s.

But in the current layer of sediment, concentrations of DDT were still higher than considered safe for fish, frogs and other aquatic life, the investigators found.

Joshua Kurek, of the department of geography and environment at Mount Allison University, in Sackville, New Brunswick, led the study.

His team also found that starting in the 1950s, life in the lakes shifted to favor species more tolerant to contaminants. DDT is banned in most countries.

The report was published June 12 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: American Chemical Society, news release, June 12, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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First Mesothelioma Treatment in 15 Years Approved

By Nick Mulcahy

May 24, 2019 — The FDA has approved the first new treatment in 15 years for an aggressive form of lung cancer.

The device, the NovoTTF-100L System made by Novocure, uses electric fields to stop solid tumors from mesothelioma from dividing.

Mesothelioma is a rare but aggressive cancer strongly associated with asbestos exposure.

The new device was approved under the Humanitarian Device Exemption, which was created to encourage innovation in rare diseases.

Mary Hesdorffer, a nurse practitioner and executive director of the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation, says the approval is a new option. “Typically, mesothelioma patients who cannot have surgery receive palliative care to mitigate their symptoms,” she says in a statement. The new treatment gives patients “a treatment option that may improve survival.”

The FDA approved Optune, another Novocure device, for the treatment of a kind of brain cancer, glioblastoma, in 2011.

Medscape Medical News

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Just A Little More Exercise Adds Years to Life

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) — No matter your fitness level, adding just a little more exercise may prolong your life, new research suggests.

“People think they have to start going to the gym and exercising hard to get fitter,” said researcher Elin Ekblom-Bak, from the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences in Stockholm.

“But it doesn’t have to be that complicated. For most people, just being more active in daily life — taking the stairs, exiting the metro station early, cycling to work — is enough to benefit health since levels are so low to start with,” she said. “The more you do, the better.”

Ekblom-Bak and her colleagues looked at more than 316,000 adults in Sweden, aged 18 to 74, whose heart-lung (cardiorespiratory) fitness was assessed between 1995 and 2015.

Participants rode a stationary cycle to determine the maximum amount of oxygen the heart and lungs can provide the muscles during exercise, a measure called VO2 max.

Overall, the risk of all-cause death and death from cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke fell 2.8% to 3.2% for each milliliter increase in VO2 max. The benefits of increased activity were seen in men and women, in all age groups, and at all fitness levels.

The study was to be presented Friday at a European Society of Cardiology meeting, in Lisbon, Portugal. Such research is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

“It is particularly important to note that an increase in fitness was beneficial, regardless of the starting point,” Ekblom-Bak said in a meeting news release. “This suggests that people with lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness have the most to gain from boosting their fitness.”

She said the findings are “more motivational than just telling people they need to do better. People in the lower range of VO2 max will reduce their risk even more [9%] while those at the upper end of VO2 max will reduce their risk by 1%,” she said.

Improving fitness should be a public health priority and doctors should assess patients’ fitness during health screening, according to Ekblom-Bak.

“Our previous research has shown that fitness levels in the general population have dropped by 10% in the last 25 years,” she noted.

“In 2016-2017, almost every second man and woman had a low fitness level, so this is a huge problem,” Ekblom-Bak added. “Poor fitness is as detrimental as smoking, obesity and diabetes, even in otherwise healthy adults, yet unlike these other risk factors it is not routinely measured.”

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Sources

SOURCE: European Society of Cardiology, news release, April 12, 2019

Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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U.S. Measles Cases Already Top Last Year’s Total

April 2, 2019 — The number of measles cases in the United States so far this year has already surpassed the total for last year.

As of March 28, there had been 387 reported cases in 15 states, according to a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report released Monday.

Last year, there were 372 cases nationwide, CBS News reported.

The number of cases so far this year is the highest since 2014, when there were a total of 667, and the second highest number since measles was declared eliminated in the United States in 2000.

The high number of measles cases so far this year are due to outbreaks in a handful of states, including California, New York and Washington, CBS News reported.

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News Bytes: ‘Ploey’ Trailer Hatches, Hinge Celebrates 10 Years, Inside ShadowMachine Portland & More

’Star Trek: Discovery’s Sonequa Martin-Green Joins LeBron James in ‘Space Jam 2’
Variety has learned that the actress, who got her big break in AMC’s Walking Dead, is in talks to play James’ wife in the hybrid animation flick — coming to theaters July 16, 2021. Terence Nance, creator of HBO’s Random Acts of Flyness, is directing, with Black Panther director Ryan Coogler producing with James and his partner Maverick Carter (through their SpringHill Entertainment banner).

Jorge Gutierrez Talks ‘Maya and the Three’ as Netflix Highlights Animation Strategy
The director of Reel FX’s Book of Life and Google Spotlight’s Son of Jaguar is preparing a 4.5-hour epic inspired by Mesoamerican mythology for the streaming giant, set to launch as a series of half-hour episodes in Summer 2021.

A Look at Hinge over the Past 10 Years
Founded by Alex Tysowksky, Michael Kuehn and Roland Gauthier, the Portland, Ore. animation and vfx shop has delivered work for clients such as Toonami and Microsoft as well as whimsical original projects like their Game of Thrones-inspired shorts Snow Knows.

Inside the Portland Studio Behind the Highly-Anticipated Reimagining of ‘Pinocchio’
The Oregonian takes us on a tour of L.A.-based ShadowMachine’s (The Shivering Truth, BoJack Horseman) Pacific Northwest outpost and dives into the Oregon city’s rich stop-motion history, the challenges of the medium and Guillermo del Toro’s long-awaited feature project.

WATCH: ‘Ploey’ Official Trailer
When he gets separated from his family, Ploey, a young flightless plover chick, must undertake a dangerous journey to a legendary valley in order to save his loved ones from falling prey to the evil falcon. Starring John Stamos (Full House) and Sean Astin (The Lord of the Rings), Ploey flies exclusively to DIRECTV Cinema on March 28; in theaters April 26.

Maya and the Three

Maya and the Three

Sonequa Martin-Green

Sonequa Martin-Green

Animation Magazine

What Are This Year’s Most Dangerous Toys?